Archive for the ‘Chennai’ Category

Why You Should Care About the Upcoming World Chess Championship Match

November 6, 2013
FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2013

FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2013

On November 9, 2013 the world is going to stop. Billions of people around the globe will be watching live as two titans clash in what may be the greatest chess match ever played. Viswanathan Anand, the Pride of India, will be taking on the charismatic “Mozart of Chess,” Magnus Carlsen.  By the end of November, the player who utterly destroys his opponent will be crowned “The King of Chess.”

Viswanathan Anand at the chess board.

Viswanathan Anand at the chess board.

Viswanathan Anand is more than a World Chess Champion. He is the greatest sportsmen ever produced from the second most populous country in the world. “Vishy,” as his friends call him, became India’s first grandmaster in 1988. Anand was also first to receive the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award in 1992. In 2007, he was awarded the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian honor. Viswanathan Anand has also won the coveted Chess Oscar a total of six times! Indeed, historians tell us that chess has its roots in ancient India, but it was not until Viswanathan Anand became World Champion that chess took a hold of the sub-continent’s imagination.

The charismatic "Mozart of Chess."

The charismatic “Mozart of Chess.”

Many consider Magnus Carlsen to be for chess, what Mozart was for music. In the long and distinguished history of chess prodigies, Magnus may be the greatest of them all. Magnus Carlsen, who started chess at the age of five, became a chess Grand Master at thirteen and the number one rated player in the world before the age of twenty. A short while later, Carlsen established the highest rating ever in the game of chess and in doing so surpassed his former teacher, Garry Kasparov. Often mentioned in the same class as Paul Morphy, Jose Raul Capablanca and Bobby Fischer, Magnus is missing only the title of World Champion to establish his residency on Mount Olympus.

Throughout human history, there have been certain events which demonstrate the greatness of human achievement. The Hammurabi Code of 1750 B.C., the dawn of Democracy in 594 B.C., The Wright Brothers taking flight in 1903 are important events on the timeline comparable to what, I believe, will result from the FIDE World Chess Championship of 2013. Chess is about to become “cool” again and our world may never be the same.

Don’t miss the event:

The Official Site for the Anand-Carlsen World Chess Championship Match of 2013

Watch live on you Android device.

Watch live on your iphone or ipad.

Get Norway’s perspective on the Anand-Carlsen World Chess Championship Match of 2013

See what India feels about Anand’s play against Carlsen.

Blogs covering the 2013 World Chess Championship:

World Chess Championship Blog

Susan Polgar’s Blog

Alexandra Kosteniuk’s Blog

Chris Torres’ Blog

Chessdom

 

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World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 2 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

November 1, 2013

In our first preview game to the 2013 World Chess Championship, we studied a game where a young Magnus Carlsen demolishes his opponent. In preview two to the World Chess Championship Match between Anand and Carlsen, we will examine a game where our current World Chess Champion destroys Vassily Ivanchuk with style.

What is the best way for white to stop Anand's attack?

What is the best way for white to stop Anand’s attack?

 

[Event “It”]

[Site “Reggio Emilia (Italy)”]

[Date “1989”]

[Round “35”]

[White “Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR)”]

[Black “Anand, Viswanathan (IND)”]

[Result “0-1”]

[Eco “C42”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nf6 {This is called Petroff’s Defence or, simply, The Russian Game.}

3.Nxe5 d6 ( 3…Nxe4 4.Qe2 Nf6 5.Nc6+ {Is a famous Queen winning trap every chess player should know.}

)

4.Nf3 Nxe4

5.d4 {This is the classical Petroff Defence.}

( 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Be7 {Is another fun line which gives white easy development and a strong attack.}

) ( 5.Qe2 Qe7 6.d3 Nf6 7.Nc3 Qxe2+ 8.Bxe2 Be7 9.Nd4 O-O 10.Bf4

c6 11.O-O d5 12.Rfe1 Na6 13.Bf3 Bd8 14.a3 Bb6 15.Nb3 Re8 16.Na4

Bc7 17.Bg5 Bf5 18.Bxf6 gxf6 19.g3 Bd6 20.Na5 Rxe1+ 21.Rxe1 Rb8

22.Nc3 Bd7 23.Nb3 Nc5 24.Nxc5 Bxc5 {…1/2-1/2, Ivanchuk Vassily (UKR) 2775  – Wang Yue (CHN) 2697 , Beijing 12/16/2011 It “Sportaccord WMG” (blindfold)}

)

d5

6.Bd3 Be7 ( 6…Bd6 7.O-O O-O 8.c4 c6 9.Nc3 Nxc3 10.bxc3

dxc4 {Black can keep the symetry a little longer with this old line. The modern preference is as played by Anand.}

)

7.O-O Nc6

8.Re1 Bg4

9.c3 f5

10.Qb3 {This is a nice way to get rid of the pin.}

Qd6 {Viswanathan Anand plays a rare move which I have also employed with success.}

( 10…O-O 11.Nbd2 Na5 12.Qc2 Bd6 13.Ne5 Bh5 14.b4 Nc6 15.Ndf3

Re8 16.Bb2 Qf6 17.Qb3 Kh8 18.Be2 Rxe5 19.dxe5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 Bxe5

21.Bxh5 Bxh2+ 22.Kxh2 Qh4+ 23.Kg1 Qxf2+ 24.Kh2 {1/2-1/2, Leko Peter (HUN) 2751  – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2788 , Linares  2/25/2005 It (cat.20)}

)

11.Nfd2 O-O-O

12.f3 Bh4 {I like this move but Ne5 is also interesting.}

( 12…Ne5 13.Bxe4 dxe4 14.fxg4 Bh4 15.Re2 Qa6 16.Qd1 Nxg4 17.h3

Qd3 18.hxg4 e3 19.Na3 Rde8 20.Nc2 Bf2+ 21.Rxf2 exf2+ 22.Kxf2

fxg4 23.Qxg4+ Kb8 24.Nf3 Qxc2+ 25.Kg1 {+0.04 CAP} )

13.Rf1

( 13.Re2 Bh5 14.Nf1 Rhf8 15.Qc2 Kb8 16.Na3 f4 17.fxe4 f3 18.gxf3

Rxf3 19.e5 Rxf1+ 20.Kxf1 Qe6 21.Kg1 Rf8 22.Be3 Qh3 23.Qd2 Bf3

24.Nc2 g5 25.Rg2 g4 26.Bf1 g3 27.Rxg3 Qf5 28.Rxf3 Qxf3 29.Bg2

Rg8 30.Kh1 Qh5 31.Bxd5 Rd8 32.Bxc6 {1-0, Anka Emil (HUN) 2400  – Mosna Stefano (ITA) 2149 , Budapest 1996 It (cat.2)}

)

Bh3 {Viswanathan Anand is not known for this kind of aggression but is certainly capable of it.}

( 13…Bf2+ 14.Rxf2 Nxf2 15.Kxf2 Qxh2 16.Nf1 Qh4+ 17.Kg1 Bh5

18.Bxf5+ Kb8 19.Be3 Rdf8 20.Bd7 Rxf3 21.Nbd2 Rf6 22.Qxd5 Rd8

23.g3 Rg6 24.Qg2 Qe7 25.Bf5 Rgd6 26.Nc4 Rd5 27.Be4 Bf7 28.Bf4

Rh5 29.Bxc6 Bxc4 30.Bxb7 Rb5 31.Bc6 Ra5 32.Ne3 Bxa2 33.Nc4 {…1-0, Kovacevic Aleksandar (SRB) 2541  – Saric Ante (CRO) 2489 , Zadar 12/13/2006 It (open)}

) ( 13…Rhf8 14.Qc2 h5 15.Nb3 Rde8 16.Na3 f4 17.fxg4 hxg4 18.Bxe4

dxe4 19.Nb5 Qh6 20.Bxf4 Rxf4 21.Rxf4 Qxf4 22.g3 Bxg3 23.hxg3

Qxg3+ 24.Qg2 Qe3+ 25.Qf2 Qd3 26.Nc5 Qxb5 27.Qf4 {1-0, Bruzon Lazaro (CUB) 2534  – Andres Gonzalez Alberto (ESP) 2362 , Oviedo 2000 Tournament (team)}

) ( 13…Nxd2 14.Nxd2 Bh5 15.Bxf5+ Kb8 16.Qc2 Ne7 {+0.56 CAP} )

 

14.Qc2 ( 14.Nxe4 fxe4 15.fxe4 dxe4 16.Bxe4 Rhf8 17.Nd2 Rde8 18.Qb5

Rxf1+ 19.Qxf1 Bd7 20.Nc4 Qf6 21.Qxf6 gxf6 22.g3 Rxe4 23.gxh4

Ne7 24.Bd2 Nf5 25.Be1 Rg4+ 26.Bg3 Be6 27.Nd2 Nxg3 28.hxg3 Rxg3+

29.Kf2 Rh3 30.Ne4 Bd5 31.Nc5 b6 32.Na6 Rxh4 33.b3 Rh3 {…1/2-1/2, Woda Jacek (POL) 2383  – Ostrowski Leszek (POL) 2340 , Poznan 1987 It}

)

Qg6

15.Nb3 Rhf8

16.Na3 ( 16.Kh1 {+1.38 CAP} )

Rde8 {Ivanchuk must play Bf4 followed by Kh1 to survive Anand’s attack.}

17.Kh1 {??} ( 17.Bf4 {!} Nd8

( 17…Bg5 {+1.46 CAP} ) 18.Kh1 Ne6 19.Be5 $18 {Borriss – Camejo, Chile 1990}

Bf6 20.gxh3 Bxe5 21.dxe5 Nf4 22.fxe4 fxe4 23.Bb5 Rxe5 24.Nd4

c6 25.Rg1 Qh6 26.Be2 Nxh3 27.Bg4+ Kb8 28.Bxh3 Qxh3 29.Qg2 Qh5

30.Raf1 Rxf1 31.Rxf1 g6 32.Qg3 a6 33.Nf5 {1-0, Borriss Martin (GER) 2427  – Camejo Rui (POR) 2296 , Santiago 1990 Ch World (juniors) (under 20)}

)

Nf2+ {!} {Anand punishes Ivanchuk’s careless play.}

18.Rxf2 Bxg2+ {!} {There is nothing for Ivanchuk to do except resign.} 0-1

World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 1 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

October 29, 2013

With the Anand-Carlsen World Championship Match just days away, I have decided to start posting some of my favorite games played by either Viswanathan Anand or Magnus Carlsen. Our first game is taken from the 2003 World Youth Chess Championships. In the gem below, a fourteen-year-old Magnus Carlsen drops the “hammer” on his fellow Norwegian.

Black to move and win. (What did Magnus Carlsen play on move 17?)

Black to move and win. (What did Magnus Carlsen play on move 17?)

[Event “FIDE World Youth Chess Championship”]

[Site “Halkidiki (Greece)”]

[Date “2003”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Hammer, Jon Ludvig (NOR)”]

[Black “Carlsen, Magnus (NOR)”]

[Result “0-1”]

[Eco “B07”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.Nf3 {Thus begins an exciting encounter between Norway’s two young superstars. I am sure Norway’s coaches were wondering why this had to happen in round 1}

d6

2.d4 Nf6

3.Nbd2 g6

4.e4 {Jon Ludvig Hammer has complete control of the center.}

Bg7

5.Bd3 O-O

6.O-O Nc6

7.c3 e5 {Magnus Carlsen strikes at white’s central advantage.}

8.h3 {Hammer plays a clever but slow move here. In doing so, he keeps control of the

Center and makes Carlsen’s bishop on “c8” a very difficult piece to develop usefully.}

Nh5 {Magnus Carlsen chooses to complicate matters after his opponent’s “slow” move.}

9.dxe5 {Hammer plays what Carlsen was hoping for. Better was}

( 9.Nb3 Nf4 10.Bxf4 exf4 11.Qd2 {

Jon Ludvig Hammer would still be controlling the center, his king is castled

and his rooks are unified(the rooks can “see” each other.} )

Nf4

{Hammer’s center is fracturing and Magnus Carlsen’s knight has invaded his territory with initiative.}

10.Bb5 {?} {Hammer bishop would be way better on “c4” sharing a diaganol with Carlsen’s

king. On “b5” it pins Carlsen’s knight to an empty square.}

Nxe5{!} {Carlsen’s knights are becoming Hammer’s problems.}

11.Nxe5{?} {Big mistake. Better was:} ( 11.Nc4 Ned3 12.Bxf4 Nxf4 13.Ne3

c6 14.Bd3 Be6 )

Qg5 {!} {The obvious punishment for Hammer’s last crime.}

12.Ng4 Qxb5

13.Nb3 Ne2+ {!} {Carlsen is still punishing Hammer’s eleventh move. I can almost hear Montell Jordan singing “This is How We Do it.”}

14.Kh1 Bxg4

15.hxg4 Rae8 {!} {If you can spot why Carlsen played his last move, you are doing better than Hammer did in this game.}

16.Be3 {????} {Correct was:} ( 16.a4 Qc4 17.Be3 )

Rxe4 17.Re1

{Jon Ludvig Hammer must have been praying that Magnus Carlsen does not see the neat finish.}

Qh5+ {!} {Of course Hammer resigns. After gxh4, Rh4 is mate.} 0-1

World Chess Championship 2013: Why I think Anand will win.

October 26, 2013

The majority of chess commentators seem to be figuring that Magnus Carlsen will defeat Viswanathan Anand and win the World Championship in his first attempt. This is likely do to the fact that, lately, Carlsen has been playing better chess than the current World Champion.  Certainly, the challenger has proven that he is capable of playing chess at the level of a world chess champion and Magnus is the current “number one.” However, the smart money will be placed on Viswanathan Anand to retain his title. Here’s why:

Viswanathan Anand will likely celebrate another World Championship with his beautiful wife Aruna.

Viswanathan Anand will likely celebrate another World Championship with his beautiful wife Aruna.

Home Field Advantage

The match will take place in Chennai, India. When FIDE announced that the match would be in Anand’s home country, I felt this gave the current World Champion a decisive advantage. In fact, FIDE could not have selected a more advantageous location for Anand than his home town.  The young Norwegian will be more distracted in India and his team will need to work hard to keep him comfortable in such an exotic location. Magnus Carlsen is used to performing under pressure but being completely surrounded by Anand’s fans will certainly make even the toughest competitor feel uneasy.

Ratings

Too much is being made of Magnus Carlsen being rated number one in the world. Magnus’ rating proves that he is the future of chess but he has acquired his number one ranking through tournament play. Anand has played very poorly in tounaments since becoming World Champion for reasons that are easy to explain. Tournaments to Anand are a necessary distraction from competing in world championship matches. Anand’s priority number one is retaining his world title.  Viswanathan rarely plays any of his critical innovations when it does not help him win a World Championship. Because he employs a weaker version of himself during the vast majority of his rated games, Anand’s rating does not accurately reflect his true strength

Youthfulness

Many see this match as the chance for chess to move completely into the twenty-first century. Indeed, if the “Mozart of Chess” manages to dethrone the old champion he will be the king of chess.  While no one will dispute that being young is incredibly advantageous in chess, it is also common knowledge that young chess players also perform more inconsistently. If Magnus plays his best chess, he has a reasonable chance of winning the match. However, we can be sure that Viswanathan Anand will be in top form and will bring the consistency of a seasoned pro to every game. I believe Anand’s experience and wisdom will more than make up for Magnus Carlsen’s youthful energy.

Match Play

As stated above, Anand is unbelievably good at match play. Magnus Carlsen has limited experience in matches and has never felt the pressure of playing for a world championship. Coupled with the aforementioned home field advantage, this should be enough for Anand to take an early lead in the match and then close it out before Magnus ever gets comfortable.

Anand’s Legacy

This represents the first time that Anand has had a chance to play a World Championship for “his people.” Anand is a national hero in India and I believe nothing is more important to the future of Indian chess than Anand retaining the World Championship title in Chennai.  A failure on his part will be a seen as a failure for Indian chess. FIDE’s gift to India is the chance for their greatest player to establish his name as one of the greatest chess champions ever while playing in his hometown. I believe Anand is acutely aware of what is at stake and will rise to the occasion.

As for Magnus, perhaps failing in his first attempt at winning the World Championship will be the best thing for his chess future. A defeat on chess highest stage will make the “Mozart of Chess” work even harder to ensure it doesn’t happen the second time around. The next time Magnus plays for the World Championship, one can only hope that FIDE chooses a site that is fair for both competitors.

Magnus Carlsen will likely benefit from defeat in his first attempt at the world chess championship.

Magnus Carlsen will likely benefit from defeat in his first attempt at the world chess championship.

The official site for the 2013 FIDE World Chess Championship.


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