Archive for the ‘Chess History’ Category

#Chess History Worth Sharing 

October 17, 2017

The “Game of the Century!”

The “Game of the Century!”

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#Chess History Worth Sharing 

August 6, 2017

One time, while playing chess at a social gathering in Paris, Benjamin Franklin captured his opponent’s king after she inadvertently placed it into check. When she stated, “Ah, we don’t take kings so…” Benjamin Franklin responded, “We do in America!”

1,000 Year-Old Chess Set to be Auctioned Off

March 16, 2016

  

The 10th-century chess set is believed to have been made in the city of Nishapur, now modern-day Iran, with several pieces equivalent to chess figures such as pawns, knights, kings and queens….

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Remembering Emory Tate on the Occasion of his Birthday

December 27, 2015
Photo of Emory Tate taken on 10/10/2015

Photo of Emory Tate taken on 10/10/2015

 

Tomorrow, 12/27/2015, would have been Emory Tate’s 57th birthday. Emory left chess enthusiasts with so much to remember him by that he will truly never be forgotten. Below, I am sharing Emory’s account of his victory in a blindfold simul held just one week before his untimely passing. All of the colorful annotations are Emory Tate’s and are placed here as an example of the passion he brought to every chess class he taught. Further proof that Emory, right up until his life ended, was a professional of the highest order.

 

[Event “Emory Tate’s Blindfold Simultaneous Exhibition”]

[Site “Fremont, California (USA)”]
[Date “2015.10.10”]
[Round “”]
[White “Tate, Emory (USA)”]
[Black “Opponent 2/5”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “D20”]
[Annotator “Emory Tate”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 {The first surprise came early.. This was my only d4 game and this move was
played by World Champion Karpov as black many many times…. This set my nerves on edge.}

Position after 2... dxc4.

Position after 2… dxc4.

 

3.e4 {Still I choose aggression.}

Position after 3. e4.

Position after 3. e4.

 

3… Nc6 {A fine move. White must react.}

Position after 3... Nc6.

Position after 3… Nc6.

4.d5 {OK}

Position after 4. d5.

Position after 4. d5.

 

4… Ne5 {A serious response… and I seem to remember that I should take on c4 now and
play the Qa4 tactic… leading to a long positional struggle. Again??? I refuse.}

Position after 4... Ne5.

Position after 4… Ne5.

5.f4 { A move seeking tactics..}

Position after 5. f4.

Position after 5. f4.

 

5… Nd3+ {Clearly best.}

Position after 5... Nd3+.

Position after 5… Nd3+.

6.Bxd3 cxd3 7.Qxd3 e6 {Now my queen is in an uncomfortable pin.. My d pawn is exposed. These new kids play very well indeed… I had to go into deep reserves of my own skill set.}

Position after 7... e6.

Position after 7… e6.

8.Nc3 Nf6 {The pressure is at the breaking point. Calm is required.}

Position after 8 ... Nf6.

Position after 8 … Nf6.

9.Nf3 exd5 {Why not c6 to crack my position once and for all??? I had prepared d6 with
nasty forks all around the center. Failing that, I protect the d6 pawn with e5
and a win! Still and all, black has two bishops and a wonderful game.. I am in trouble. The limit of tactics is revealed.}

 

Position after 9... exd5.

Position after 9… exd5.

10.e5 {I gasp for air.}

Position after 10. e5.

Position after 10. e5.

10… Nh5 {Quite risky.. Even fearless.}

Position after 10... Nh5.

Position after 10… Nh5.

11.Qxd5 {I did not want to trade queens blindfolded, but if Nd5 then c6 puts me in a pickle!}

Position after 11. Qxd5.

Position after 11. Qxd5.

11… Qxd5 12.Nxd5 Kd7 {Necessary agression.}

Position after 12. Kd7.

Position after 12. Kd7.

13.g4 {I thought here that I had tricked my young opponent… but NO!!}

Position after 13. g4.

Position after 13. g4.

13… Kc6 {!} {Meeting fire with fire. I was puzzled. What to do? So I remained calm..}

Position after 13... Kc6.

Position after 13… Kc6.

14.gxh5 Kxd5 {My pawn structure is compromised, and under eniormous pressure I announced
0-0-0 check.. only to be told.. “illegal move.” and it all came back to me.. I
have 5 boards and 5 dangerous opponents.. ultimate failure is just over the mental horizon. Honestly…}

Position after 14... Kxd5.

Position after 14… Kxd5.

15.Rg1 {Then I played Rg1 (not only to restrict his development, but a mult-faceted
move.. if he wants to move the f8 bishop, perhaps he might play g6 giving my
doubled h pawn exchangibility. Value… and there are other factors.) I was
playing my hardest now. I keep his bishop off g4, a move which could ruin me. And I survive another moment.}

Position after 15. Rg1.

Position after 15. Rg1.

15… Ke4 {A super-aggressive play. Against Tate?}

Position after 15... Ke4.

Position after 15… Ke4.

16.Ng5+ Kd3 {And he is deep in my rear area. Now I see. I considered a drawing sequence..
i.e., Nf7 Rg8 Nh6 Rh8 Nf7 Rg8 etc… Until I noticed he can break the sequence
at any time with Bb4 check. I became a bit desperate so I tossed in a check….}

Position after 16... Kd3.

Position after 16… Kd3.

17.Rg3+ Kc2 {Honestly?}

Position after 17... Kc2.

Position after 17… Kc2.

18.Rc3#  1-0

Position after 18. Rc3#

Position after 18. Rc3#

 

 

Kindred’s Special: 1945 Radio Match cont’d

November 20, 2015

  

I met the colorful and brilliant tactician Al Horowitz while making several trips to the Manhattan Chess Club located at the time at the Hudson Hotel quarters while in training at Fort Dix, New Jersey….

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Kindred’s Special: The Radio Team Match continued

November 19, 2015

  
Herman Steiner hailed from California and was a darling of the Hollywood crowd, often giving exhibitions and game play with a host of friends.  The following game provides a nice setting for the type of dynamic skill he possessed….

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