Archive for the ‘chess news’ Category

#Chess Lesson Worth Sharing: Carlsen vs. Xiangzhi 2017 FIDE World Cup

September 14, 2017

One of my favorite jazz artists, Charles Mingus once said, “Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity.” In chess, it is quite common for the more confident player to add complications to the position in order to allow him/her more opportunities to prove superior skill. In general, this is a good strategy and oftentimes the resulting victories are praised by chess aficionados. Of course, another result is also quite possible.

In the 2017 FIDE World Cup match between Bu Xiangzhi and World Champion Magnus Carlsen, Magnus’ over complicated style with the white pieces was dealt a devastating blow by Bu’s straight forward approach as black. Magnus chose a slow developing line of the Giuoco Piano which included several slow pawn moves and piece redeployments. Bu Xiangzhi on the other hand played a fairly straight forward opening with only one cryptic move (9… Rab8.) The result of the game clearly demonstrated the dangers of being too fancy as Magnus’ 11. h3 was severely punished by a common bishop sacrifice and a very creative early advancement of the h-pawn.

As a fan of Magnus Carlsen this game was painful to watch. As a chess educator, this game is a golden opportunity to demonstrate important lessons. For this reason I am sharing my lesson plans on this game. Try pairing the moves with Charles Mingus’ “Music Written for Monterey.”

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 1

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 2

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 3

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 4

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 5

 

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3rd Annual Greater California Scholastic Chess Championship

August 14, 2017


Over the weekend(August 12-13,) I had the pleasure of attending the 3rd Annual Greater California Scholastic Chess Championship held by the American Chess Academy at the beautiful Maple Park Community Center in Glendale, California. The event was sponsored by the Kasparov Chess Foundation and Beyond Chess assisted the ACA with event management. It was a special treat to attend such a well run scholastic chess tournament organized by such amazing and professional people. I would like to extend my gratitude to Armen Ambartsoumian for convincing me to attend this fine event.

Armen Ambartsoumian diligently performing his duties as a tournament director.


Some of the younger competitors at the beginning of their fourth round.


The park directly outside of the tournament site was a popular hangout spot.

Click here for more information on the American Chess Academy.

Book a Chess Camp in Your Own Home!

July 24, 2017


This is an exclusive invitation to have your children spend a week or weekend with some of California’s most popular chess coaches in the comfort of your own home. Let the Torres Chess and Music Academy take away the worry of driving your children to chess camp by booking us to bring our world-class instruction to you. We will bring all the sets, clocks and other materials necessary for a first rate chess camp to your home or sponsored location. Our coaches each have decades of experience teaching children the most practical endgame strategies, incredible techniques to spotting game winning tactics and the most dominating opening lines from actual games. Please contact us with any ideas for your camp and we will work with you, always understanding time constraints and budgets.

Click here to see photos from our chess camps so far this summer

Please send inquiries to Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com

San Jose Chess Camp to Teach Decision Making Skills to Bay Area Youth

July 7, 2017

SAN JOSE, CA – 07/06/2017

— Chris Torres, the President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy, has been successfully inspiring California’s young chess players for over 20 years. During this time, his annual summer chess camp has proven itself a good training ground for the Bay Area’s brightest chess talent. This year’s San Jose summer chess camp is celebrating his 20 years of knowledge sharing by returning the tuition back to just $160/week the same price Chris charged in 1997!

Over the past two decades Mr. Torres’ classes have attracted players of all abilities ranging from absolute beginners to national champions. Regardless of a child’s talent level, Chris believes that chess benefits all children by improving their decision making skills.

“Using the power of chess to teach children good decision making skills has always been the most important aspect of my coaching. I have personally witnessed how strong decision making skills allow children to excel in all aspects of life. Former students who are now doctors, lawyers, engineers and leaders in Silicon Valley continue to support my classes because they credit much of their successes to chess.”

The Torres Chess and Music Academy’s summer chess camp in San Jose, California will run from July 17-27’th and is open to players of all skill levels. Attendees will receive instruction from Chris Torres, other TCAMA coaches and several highly esteemed instructors including Frisco Del Rosario, Francisco Anchondo and Jay Stallings! Additionally each week there will be a USCF rated tournament and a puzzle solving competition with awards given at the end of each week. All students who complete two weeks of camp will receive a commemorative camp T-shirt, a special 1 on 1 follow up lesson with Chris Torres, and a hand signed diploma. To apply online, or for more information on the TCAMA, please visit www.CHESSANDMUSIC.com, or contact Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com.

Media Contacts:

Company Name: Torres Chess & Music Academy
Full Name: Chris
Phone: (209)323-0197
Email Address: SEND EMAIL
Website: www.ChessAndMusic.com

San Jose Summer Chess Camp to Celebrate 20 Years of Success

June 3, 2017

SAN JOSE, CA – 28 May, 2017 – Northern California chess instructor Chris Torres is celebrating his 20th anniversary teaching chess this summer. Two decades of experience have transformed Chris’s summer camps from a small beginner class held in a garage into the must attend event of the summer for many of California’s most successful youth chess players. To celebrate his 20 years of success, the Torres Chess and Music Academy is offering its San Jose summer camp at 1997 prices!

img_0731-1

Twenty years ago, Chris Torres decided to leave a promising career at a legendary Silicon Valley company in order to combine his passions for chess and teaching. At just nineteen years of age, this change of occupation seemed unwise to many of Chris’s closest friends and family. Though after just one year of teaching chess professionally, Chris Torres’ teaching services were in high demand based on the outstanding results of his first crop of students.

The Torres Chess and Music Academy was established in 2005 in order to meet the growing demand for quality chess and music lessons in the Bay Area. That year, the TCAMA established several popular after school programs, weekend chess clubs, tournaments and summer camps. As word spread, these scholastic chess clubs and events quickly grew in size and number. During these periods of growth, Chris Torres regularly collaborated with other top instructors from around the United States in order to keep raising the bar for quality chess instruction in Northern California.

Today the Torres Chess and Music Academy’s successful approach is internationally recognized by FIDE (the world chess organization) which listed the TCAMA as an official FIDE Academy. Even with the rise in popularity of scholastic chess all throughout the Golden State, The Torres Chess and Music Academy remains the only California based chess organization to hold this important distinction.

“This summer I will be celebrating 20 years of service as a professional chess instructor. I am thankful to the thousands of families who chose to place their children in my after school programs, tournaments and camps for making this anniversary possible. In recognition of this professional achievement, I have rolled back the prices on our summer camps back to 1997 levels. I look forward to teaching your children this summer and continuing to serve in my current capacity for another 20 years.”

The Torres Chess and Music Academy’s summer chess camp will meet July 17 to July 27 at St. Timothy’s Christian Academy, 5100 Camden Ave, San Jose. The tuition for this camp is only $160/week. For more information on the Torres Chess and Music Academy’s summer chess camp in San Jose, California, please visit: www.ChessAndMusic.com

Media Contact
Company Name: Torres Chess and Music Academy
Contact Person: Chris Torres
Email: chesslessons@aol.com
Phone: (209)323-0197
Country: United States
Website: www.ChessAndMusic.com

Hidden Gems Abound at the 2016 Chess Olympiads

September 4, 2016

One of my favorite hobbies is treasure hunting for beautifully instructive chess games during the annual Chess Olympiads. With more than 180 countries each sending their best male and female teams to compete in one event, the Chess Olympiads is a veritable mother load of chess gems. For hunting these chess treasures, I follow along at:

The official site for the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads

http://www1.bakuchessolympiad.com//

 

 

Chess Daily News

https://chessdailynews.com

 

ChessGames.com

http://www.chessgames.com/index.html

 

FM Qiu Zhou of Canada

FM Qiyu Zhou of Canada

And to illustrate just the kind of hidden gems I am talking about, I present Sindira Joshi (Nepal) vs. Qiyu Zhou (Canada) from round 1 of the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads. Enjoy…

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.2”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Joshi, Sindira”]
[Black “Zhou, Qiyu”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C54”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C54]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {The start to the Scotch.}

3… exd4

4.Bc4 Bc5

5.c3 {Transposing to a Giuoco Piano.}

5… Nf6

6.cxd4 Bb4+

7.Bd2 {White could have also chosen the equally popular Moeller Attack by playing Nc3 and gambitting the e-pawn.}

( 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 O-O 11.Rxe4 Ne7 12.d6
cxd6 13.Qxd6 Nf5 14.Qd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bxg5 16.Nxg5 Qxg5 17.Qxf7+
{1-0, Euwe Max (NED) – Van Mindeno A, Netherlands 1927 It “AVRO”} )

 

Position after 7. Bd2

Position after 7. Bd2

 

7… Nxe4

8.Bxb4 Nxb4

9.Bxf7+ Kxf7

10.Qb3+ d5 {Discovered by Gioachino Greco, this line is a mere 400 years old.}

 

Position after 10... d5

Position after 10… d5

 

11.Qxb4 {Greco preffered Ne5+ here.}

11… Rf8

12.Nc3 {So far so good for the much lower rated Sindira Joshi. Her chances are about equal here.}
( 12.O-O Ng5 13.Ne5+ Kg8 14.Nc3 c6 15.f4 Nf7 16.Ne2 Nd6 17.Ng3
a5 18.Qa3 a4 19.Qb4 a3 20.bxa3 Nb5 21.a4 Qd6 22.Rab1 Qxb4 23.Rxb4
Nc3 24.Rb3 Nxa4 25.Ne2 Ra6 26.g3 Nb6 27.Nc3 Na4 28.Ne2 Nb6 29.Nc3
Nc4 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Rb4 b5 {…1/2-1/2, Schaefer Markus (GER) 2390 – Postny Evgeny (ISR) 2595 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club})

12… Nxc3 13.bxc3 {?} {A slight innacuracy. Better was Qxc3 as seen in this game:}

( 13.Qxc3 Kg8 14.O-O Qd6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Rae1 Rae8 17.Re3 Re6 18.Rfe1
Ref6 19.b4 {1/2-1/2, Danilenko Dmitriy (UKR) 1992 – Pavlov Maxim (UKR) 2327 , Alushta 5/18/2006 Ch Ukraine (1/2 final)})

13… Kg8

14.Ne5 {?} {Another harmless looking mistake. Much better was h4 to prevent Qg5.}

 

Position after 14. Ne5

Position after 14. Ne5

 

14… Qg5 {Here comes trouble.}

15.g3 {?} {As dangerous as it looks, castling is to be preferred here.}

15… Rxf2 {!} {Qiyu Zhou starts her combination with a beautiful rook sacrifice.}

 

Position after 15.... Rxf2

Position after 15…. Rxf2

 

16.Kxf2 Qd2+

17.Kf3 Bh3 {Qiyu Zhou is putting on a tactical clinic.}

 

Position after 15... Bh3

Position after 15… Bh3

 

18.Rad1 {Sindira Joshi seems to be playing the most accurate responses but Qiyu Zhou continues to press her advantage.}

18… Bg2+

19.Kg4 Qe2+

20.Kh4 Bxh1 {Not just to win the exchange but also to set up a vicious fork.}

 

Position after 20... Bxh1

Position after 20… Bxh1

 

21.Rxh1 Qe4+ {and now Sindira Joshi’s only chance is to hope for a rare blunder from Qiyu Zhou.}

22.Kh3 Qxh1 {Qiyu Zhou concludes the prefectly executed 8 move combination.}

23.Qe7 {Sindira Joshi finally has a choice but it is to pick her own poison.}

( 23.Qxb7 Rf8 24.Qxc7 Qf1+ 25.Kh4 Qf6+ 26.Kh3 Qf5+ 27.g4 Qf1+
28.Kg3 Qf4+ 29.Kg2 g5 {seems very unpleasant for white.} ) {%09DB}

23… Qf1+ {Qiyu Zhou grabs the initiative again.}

 

Position after 23... Qf1+

Position after 23… Qf1+

 

24.Kh4 Qf6+ {Qiyu Zhou wisely choses to force an exchange of queens and head into a rook vs. knight endgame.}

25.Qxf6 gxf6

26.Nd7 Kf7

27.Nc5 b6

28.Nd3 Re8

29.Nf4 {Hats off to Sindira Joshi for continueing to play on and give us a chance to study good endgame technique.}

 

Position after 29. Nf4

Position after 29. Nf4

 

29… c6

30.Kg4 Re3

31.Kf5 {Nothing can be done to save white’s queenside pawns from a Qiyu Zhou’s rampaging rook.}

31… Rxc3

32.Nh5 Rc2

33.h4 Rxa2

34.Kf4 a5

35.Ke3 b5

36.Nf4 a4

37.Nd3 a3

38.Nb4 Rb2 {Sindira Joshi resigns as there is no hope left for white.} 0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Ask A Kid: Chess And Management For Non-Chess Players 

August 16, 2016

From The Huffington Post:

Can you imagine a 10 year old, looking through billions of possibilities to come up with the exact 4-5 scenarios of crucial decision making? It certainly seems to be taken from a movie set in the future or it can very well be the case of an IT engineer analyzing petabytes of data for the NASA. Nevertheless, this particular situations are often real life cases in the world of chess.
Continue to the full article here: http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_57a4e4f2e4b0c94bd3c953d0

Multi Site Chess Tournament Returns to Fremont 

June 8, 2016

MULTISITE TOURNAMENT ANNOUNCEMENT JUNE 11th 2016

photo credit: NASA


Participants will compete online and onsite against opposition from across the country in this exciting new tournament format. 
Chess venues who wish to participate in multi-site tournaments please register at the link below. Chess venues outside the United States will be given special consideration -so we can have a truly international event:
 https://multisitechess.wufoo.com/forms/m1inq14l0y26td5/
Locations include Brooklyn, Long Island, and Silicon Valley. 
Entries accepted on a ‘first-come, first-served basis.’ 
Registration closes 12:30pm EDT/9:30am PDT, first round at 1pm EDT/10am PDT
Prizes will be distributed via Paypal within a day or two of tournament completion.
4 Rounds Swiss system Tournament. G/30 d5.
Unrated. Limit 10 players per site. 
$20 Entry Fee via PayPal to MutiSiteChess@gmail.com or cash at the door, $25 after June 4th
Prizes 25% of entries to first, 15% to second, 15% to top Under 1800
 
Reg.: Must have Internet Chess Club (ICC) account. Complimentary one-day accounts will be provided to those without accounts.
Join at www.chessclub.com
Participants are encouraged to register in advance at:
https://multisitechess.wufoo.com/forms/q26wpef1b3rv9j/

or contact your desired location:
Li Chess Center
 (516) 796-4443
briankaren@usa.net 
www.lichesscenter.com 

New York Chess And Games
 (718) 398-3727
nycandg@aol.com 
www.newyorkchessandgameshop.com/

Torres Chess and Music Academy
(209) 323-0197
chesslessons@aol.com 
www.chessandmusic.com/chess/

California Location will be at:

Achiever Institute

43475 Ellsworth Street Fremont, CA 94539 

High Honors for the Torres Chess and Music Academy

May 19, 2016


FIDE, the official world chess organization, has only endorsed 48 academies world wide for their commitment to educational excellence in chess. The Torres Chess and Music Academy is honored to now be a part of this select group of chess schools. In addition to this international distinction, the Torres Chess and Music Academy has also been granted some notable privilidges including access to special FIDE training resources. I am confident that these privilidges will result in our organization becoming even better equipped to help California’s young chess players succeed at every level of competition.

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

www.ChessAndMusic.com 

 
 

Kasparov’s Scotch too Strong for So

April 28, 2016
Garry Kasparov (photo: www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov (photo: http://www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov triumphantly returned to top level chess by crushing Wesley So in round one of the Ultimate Blitz Challenge today in Saint Louis. In vintage form, Kasparov played his beloved Scotch in a remarkable victory against the new generation of elite chess players.

[Event “Ultimate Blitz Challenge”]
[Site “Saint Louis (USA)”]
[Date “2016.4.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Kasparov, Garry”]
[Black “So, Wesley”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C45”]
[Annotator “Torres, Chris”]

{[ SCOTCH GAME,C45]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {Garry Kasparov wastes no time in testing his beloved Scotch against the new generation of elite chess players.}

Position after 3. d4.

Position after 3. d4.

3… exd4

4.Nxd4 Nf6

5.Nxc6 bxc6

6.e5 Qe7

7.Qe2 Nd5

8.c4 Ba6

9.b3 g6

( 9…O-O-O 10.g3 g5 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.Nd2 Nb4 13.Nf3 Rhe8 14.a3
g4 15.Nh4 Bxe5 16.O-O-O Na2+ 17.Kc2 Qf6 18.Bxe5 Rxe5 19.Qd2 Rde8
20.Bd3 d5 21.Rhe1 d4 22.Rxe5 Rxe5 23.f3 Nc3 24.Rf1 Qd6 25.Kb2
c5 26.fxg4 Bb7 27.Rxf7 Be4 28.Nf5 Qb6 29.Re7 {…1/2-1/2, Rublevsky Sergei (RUS) 2683 – Karjakin Sergey (RUS) 2747 , Poikovsky 6/12/2010 It (cat.18)})

Position after 9... g6.

Position after 9… g6.

 

10.Ba3

( 10.f4 Qb4+ 11.Bd2 Qb6 12.Qe4 f5 13.Qf3
Qd4 14.Nc3 Nxc3 15.Bxc3 Bb4 16.Rc1 Bxc3+ 17.Rxc3 O-O-O 18.c5
Bb7 19.Qe3 Qxe3+ 20.Rxe3 d6 21.Bc4 Kd7 22.h4 d5 23.Bd3 h5 24.Rg3
Rh6 25.b4 Ke6 26.Kd2 Ra8 27.Rb1 a6 28.Rb3 Kf7 29.Ra3 Rhh8 {…1-0, Kasparov Garry (RUS) 2849 – Bacrot Etienne (FRA) 2613 , Sarajevo 2000 It (cat.19)})

10… c5

( 10…Qg5 11.Bxf8 Kxf8 12.Nd2 Re8 13.Nf3 Qf5 14.g3 Nb4
15.O-O-O Nxa2+ 16.Kb2 Nb4 17.h4 d6 18.Bh3 Qf6 19.exf6 Rxe2+ 20.Kc3
Na2+ 21.Kd3 Rxf2 22.Rhf1 Nb4+ 23.Ke3 Rb2 24.Nd2 c5 25.Kf2 Bb7
26.Kg1 Nc2 27.Rf2 Nd4 28.Re1 h6 29.Bg2 Bxg2 30.Kxg2 {…0-1, Khader Sami (JOR) 2413 – Amin Bassem (EGY) 2505 , Abudhabi 8/15/2006 It (open)})

( 10…Qxa3 11.Nxa3 Bb4+ 12.Qd2 Bxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Ne7 14.Re1 Rf8
15.c5 Bxf1 16.Rhxf1 Rb8 17.Re4 Nd5 18.Ra4 Rb7 19.Re1 Ke7 20.Ree4
f6 21.exf6+ Kxf6 22.Nc4 Rd8 23.Ne5 Rb5 24.Ng4+ Kf7 25.Rxa7 Rxc5
26.a4 Nc3 27.Rf4+ Ke6 28.Ne3 Nb1+ 29.Ke2 Nc3+ 30.Kd3 {…1/2-1/2, Savchenko Boris (RUS) 2627 – Nabaty Tamir (ISR) 2526 , Bansko 12/16/2010 It (open)})

11.g3

( 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.f4 O-O 13.g3 Nb6 14.Bg2 Rad8 15.Nc3 Rfe8
16.Rb1 d5 17.Bf3 f6 18.Nb5 c6 19.Nd6 Rxd6 20.exd6 Qd7 21.Be5
fxe5 22.Bg4 Qxd6 23.O-O e4 24.Rfd1 d4 25.Bf3 d3 26.Qe1 Qe6 27.Bg2
Bd4+ 28.Kh1 Qe7 29.a4 Bc8 30.a5 Nd7 {…0-1, Murariu Andrei (ROM) 2503 – Smeets Jan (NED) 2619 , Verdun 1995 Ch Europe (juniors) (under 10)})

11… Bg7 ( 11…Nb6 12.Bg2 Rd8 13.Nd2 Bg7 14.Bb2 O-O 15.O-O Rfe8
16.Rfe1 d6 17.Bc6 Nd7 18.Nf3 dxe5 19.Rad1 f6 20.Ba3 Bf8 21.Qe3
Qe6 22.Bd5 {1-0, Knotkova Martina (CZE) – Koubkova Alena (CZE) 2038, Chrudim (Czech Republic) 1993})

12.f4

Position after 12. f4.

Position after 12. f4.

 

12… Nb4

13.Bg2 Rd8

14.Nc3 O-O

15.Bb2 d5

16.a3 d4

17.axb4 dxc3

18.Bxc3 cxb4

19.Bb2 Bc8

20.O-O

Position after 20. 0-0.

Position after 20. 0-0.

20… f6 {?} {This is just not a good move. It would have been much better for Wesley So to
simply redeploy his bishop to f5 then expose his king to Bd5+.}

21.Bd5+ {!} {Garry Kasparov takes advantage of his opponent’s self-inflicted weakness.}

21… Rxd5 {?} {Did Wesley So panic and miss his best chance for avoiding a loss? Perhaps Kasparov’s Scotch is too strong for So.}
( 21…Kh8 22.exf6 ( 22.Rxa7 fxe5 23.Bxe5 Bg4 24.Qb2
( 24.Qxg4 {?} Qc5+ 25.Kh1 Qxa7 ) ) Qc5+ 23.Qf2 Qxf2+ 24.Rxf2
Bxf6 )

Position after 21... Rxd5.

Position after 21… Rxd5.

22.cxd5

22… Qc5+

23.Rf2 fxe5

24.Bxe5 Bxe5

25.Qxe5 Rd8

26.Rd1 Bg4

27.Qd4 Qa5

28.Rdd2 Re8

29.Kg2 Qb5

30.h3 {Unsurprisingly, Garry Kasparov’s technique is still first-rate.}

Position after 30. h3.

Position after 30. h3.

 

30… Bf5

31.g4 Be4+

32.Kh2 c5

33.Qf6 ( 33.dxc6 Bxc6 34.Qxa7 {Is fine but Kasparov’s plan seems to win in a simpler fashion.})

33… c4

34.d6 ( 34.bxc4 Qd7 35.Qd4 b3 36.Rde2 {Is an alternative path to victory.})

34… Bc6

35.f5 {!} {Kasparov pushes So against the ropes!}

35… Rf8 {Kasparov has mate in 12.}

36.Qe6+ ( 36.Qe6+ Kg7 37.fxg6 Bf3 38.Qe7+ Kxg6 39.d7 Qb8+ 40.Rd6+
Qxd6+ 41.Qxd6+ Rf6 42.d8=Q Rxd6 43.Qxd6+ Kg7 44.Rxf3 h5 45.gxh5
a6 46.Qf8+ Kh7 47.Rf7#)

36… Kg7

37.d7 {Not the most accurate but perhaps the easiest continuation in a blitz game.}

37… Qc5

38.Qd6 ( 38…Qxd6+ 39.Rxd6 {and So has to choose between saving his bishop or allowing Kasparov to regain a queen.}) 1-0

Final Position.

Final Position.

 

 


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