Archive for the ‘chess news’ Category

Hidden Gems Abound at the 2016 Chess Olympiads

September 4, 2016

One of my favorite hobbies is treasure hunting for beautifully instructive chess games during the annual Chess Olympiads. With more than 180 countries each sending their best male and female teams to compete in one event, the Chess Olympiads is a veritable mother load of chess gems. For hunting these chess treasures, I follow along at:

The official site for the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads

http://www1.bakuchessolympiad.com//

 

 

Chess Daily News

https://chessdailynews.com

 

ChessGames.com

http://www.chessgames.com/index.html

 

FM Qiu Zhou of Canada

FM Qiyu Zhou of Canada

And to illustrate just the kind of hidden gems I am talking about, I present Sindira Joshi (Nepal) vs. Qiyu Zhou (Canada) from round 1 of the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads. Enjoy…

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.2”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Joshi, Sindira”]
[Black “Zhou, Qiyu”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C54”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C54]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {The start to the Scotch.}

3… exd4

4.Bc4 Bc5

5.c3 {Transposing to a Giuoco Piano.}

5… Nf6

6.cxd4 Bb4+

7.Bd2 {White could have also chosen the equally popular Moeller Attack by playing Nc3 and gambitting the e-pawn.}

( 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 O-O 11.Rxe4 Ne7 12.d6
cxd6 13.Qxd6 Nf5 14.Qd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bxg5 16.Nxg5 Qxg5 17.Qxf7+
{1-0, Euwe Max (NED) – Van Mindeno A, Netherlands 1927 It “AVRO”} )

 

Position after 7. Bd2

Position after 7. Bd2

 

7… Nxe4

8.Bxb4 Nxb4

9.Bxf7+ Kxf7

10.Qb3+ d5 {Discovered by Gioachino Greco, this line is a mere 400 years old.}

 

Position after 10... d5

Position after 10… d5

 

11.Qxb4 {Greco preffered Ne5+ here.}

11… Rf8

12.Nc3 {So far so good for the much lower rated Sindira Joshi. Her chances are about equal here.}
( 12.O-O Ng5 13.Ne5+ Kg8 14.Nc3 c6 15.f4 Nf7 16.Ne2 Nd6 17.Ng3
a5 18.Qa3 a4 19.Qb4 a3 20.bxa3 Nb5 21.a4 Qd6 22.Rab1 Qxb4 23.Rxb4
Nc3 24.Rb3 Nxa4 25.Ne2 Ra6 26.g3 Nb6 27.Nc3 Na4 28.Ne2 Nb6 29.Nc3
Nc4 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Rb4 b5 {…1/2-1/2, Schaefer Markus (GER) 2390 – Postny Evgeny (ISR) 2595 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club})

12… Nxc3 13.bxc3 {?} {A slight innacuracy. Better was Qxc3 as seen in this game:}

( 13.Qxc3 Kg8 14.O-O Qd6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Rae1 Rae8 17.Re3 Re6 18.Rfe1
Ref6 19.b4 {1/2-1/2, Danilenko Dmitriy (UKR) 1992 – Pavlov Maxim (UKR) 2327 , Alushta 5/18/2006 Ch Ukraine (1/2 final)})

13… Kg8

14.Ne5 {?} {Another harmless looking mistake. Much better was h4 to prevent Qg5.}

 

Position after 14. Ne5

Position after 14. Ne5

 

14… Qg5 {Here comes trouble.}

15.g3 {?} {As dangerous as it looks, castling is to be preferred here.}

15… Rxf2 {!} {Qiyu Zhou starts her combination with a beautiful rook sacrifice.}

 

Position after 15.... Rxf2

Position after 15…. Rxf2

 

16.Kxf2 Qd2+

17.Kf3 Bh3 {Qiyu Zhou is putting on a tactical clinic.}

 

Position after 15... Bh3

Position after 15… Bh3

 

18.Rad1 {Sindira Joshi seems to be playing the most accurate responses but Qiyu Zhou continues to press her advantage.}

18… Bg2+

19.Kg4 Qe2+

20.Kh4 Bxh1 {Not just to win the exchange but also to set up a vicious fork.}

 

Position after 20... Bxh1

Position after 20… Bxh1

 

21.Rxh1 Qe4+ {and now Sindira Joshi’s only chance is to hope for a rare blunder from Qiyu Zhou.}

22.Kh3 Qxh1 {Qiyu Zhou concludes the prefectly executed 8 move combination.}

23.Qe7 {Sindira Joshi finally has a choice but it is to pick her own poison.}

( 23.Qxb7 Rf8 24.Qxc7 Qf1+ 25.Kh4 Qf6+ 26.Kh3 Qf5+ 27.g4 Qf1+
28.Kg3 Qf4+ 29.Kg2 g5 {seems very unpleasant for white.} ) {%09DB}

23… Qf1+ {Qiyu Zhou grabs the initiative again.}

 

Position after 23... Qf1+

Position after 23… Qf1+

 

24.Kh4 Qf6+ {Qiyu Zhou wisely choses to force an exchange of queens and head into a rook vs. knight endgame.}

25.Qxf6 gxf6

26.Nd7 Kf7

27.Nc5 b6

28.Nd3 Re8

29.Nf4 {Hats off to Sindira Joshi for continueing to play on and give us a chance to study good endgame technique.}

 

Position after 29. Nf4

Position after 29. Nf4

 

29… c6

30.Kg4 Re3

31.Kf5 {Nothing can be done to save white’s queenside pawns from a Qiyu Zhou’s rampaging rook.}

31… Rxc3

32.Nh5 Rc2

33.h4 Rxa2

34.Kf4 a5

35.Ke3 b5

36.Nf4 a4

37.Nd3 a3

38.Nb4 Rb2 {Sindira Joshi resigns as there is no hope left for white.} 0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Ask A Kid: Chess And Management For Non-Chess Players 

August 16, 2016

From The Huffington Post:

Can you imagine a 10 year old, looking through billions of possibilities to come up with the exact 4-5 scenarios of crucial decision making? It certainly seems to be taken from a movie set in the future or it can very well be the case of an IT engineer analyzing petabytes of data for the NASA. Nevertheless, this particular situations are often real life cases in the world of chess.
Continue to the full article here: http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_57a4e4f2e4b0c94bd3c953d0

Multi Site Chess Tournament Returns to Fremont 

June 8, 2016

MULTISITE TOURNAMENT ANNOUNCEMENT JUNE 11th 2016

photo credit: NASA


Participants will compete online and onsite against opposition from across the country in this exciting new tournament format. 
Chess venues who wish to participate in multi-site tournaments please register at the link below. Chess venues outside the United States will be given special consideration -so we can have a truly international event:
 https://multisitechess.wufoo.com/forms/m1inq14l0y26td5/
Locations include Brooklyn, Long Island, and Silicon Valley. 
Entries accepted on a ‘first-come, first-served basis.’ 
Registration closes 12:30pm EDT/9:30am PDT, first round at 1pm EDT/10am PDT
Prizes will be distributed via Paypal within a day or two of tournament completion.
4 Rounds Swiss system Tournament. G/30 d5.
Unrated. Limit 10 players per site. 
$20 Entry Fee via PayPal to MutiSiteChess@gmail.com or cash at the door, $25 after June 4th
Prizes 25% of entries to first, 15% to second, 15% to top Under 1800
 
Reg.: Must have Internet Chess Club (ICC) account. Complimentary one-day accounts will be provided to those without accounts.
Join at www.chessclub.com
Participants are encouraged to register in advance at:
https://multisitechess.wufoo.com/forms/q26wpef1b3rv9j/

or contact your desired location:
Li Chess Center
 (516) 796-4443
briankaren@usa.net 
www.lichesscenter.com 

New York Chess And Games
 (718) 398-3727
nycandg@aol.com 
www.newyorkchessandgameshop.com/

Torres Chess and Music Academy
(209) 323-0197
chesslessons@aol.com 
www.chessandmusic.com/chess/

California Location will be at:

Achiever Institute

43475 Ellsworth Street Fremont, CA 94539 

High Honors for the Torres Chess and Music Academy

May 19, 2016


FIDE, the official world chess organization, has only endorsed 48 academies world wide for their commitment to educational excellence in chess. The Torres Chess and Music Academy is honored to now be a part of this select group of chess schools. In addition to this international distinction, the Torres Chess and Music Academy has also been granted some notable privilidges including access to special FIDE training resources. I am confident that these privilidges will result in our organization becoming even better equipped to help California’s young chess players succeed at every level of competition.

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

www.ChessAndMusic.com 

 
 

Kasparov’s Scotch too Strong for So

April 28, 2016
Garry Kasparov (photo: www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov (photo: http://www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov triumphantly returned to top level chess by crushing Wesley So in round one of the Ultimate Blitz Challenge today in Saint Louis. In vintage form, Kasparov played his beloved Scotch in a remarkable victory against the new generation of elite chess players.

[Event “Ultimate Blitz Challenge”]
[Site “Saint Louis (USA)”]
[Date “2016.4.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Kasparov, Garry”]
[Black “So, Wesley”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C45”]
[Annotator “Torres, Chris”]

{[ SCOTCH GAME,C45]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {Garry Kasparov wastes no time in testing his beloved Scotch against the new generation of elite chess players.}

Position after 3. d4.

Position after 3. d4.

3… exd4

4.Nxd4 Nf6

5.Nxc6 bxc6

6.e5 Qe7

7.Qe2 Nd5

8.c4 Ba6

9.b3 g6

( 9…O-O-O 10.g3 g5 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.Nd2 Nb4 13.Nf3 Rhe8 14.a3
g4 15.Nh4 Bxe5 16.O-O-O Na2+ 17.Kc2 Qf6 18.Bxe5 Rxe5 19.Qd2 Rde8
20.Bd3 d5 21.Rhe1 d4 22.Rxe5 Rxe5 23.f3 Nc3 24.Rf1 Qd6 25.Kb2
c5 26.fxg4 Bb7 27.Rxf7 Be4 28.Nf5 Qb6 29.Re7 {…1/2-1/2, Rublevsky Sergei (RUS) 2683 – Karjakin Sergey (RUS) 2747 , Poikovsky 6/12/2010 It (cat.18)})

Position after 9... g6.

Position after 9… g6.

 

10.Ba3

( 10.f4 Qb4+ 11.Bd2 Qb6 12.Qe4 f5 13.Qf3
Qd4 14.Nc3 Nxc3 15.Bxc3 Bb4 16.Rc1 Bxc3+ 17.Rxc3 O-O-O 18.c5
Bb7 19.Qe3 Qxe3+ 20.Rxe3 d6 21.Bc4 Kd7 22.h4 d5 23.Bd3 h5 24.Rg3
Rh6 25.b4 Ke6 26.Kd2 Ra8 27.Rb1 a6 28.Rb3 Kf7 29.Ra3 Rhh8 {…1-0, Kasparov Garry (RUS) 2849 – Bacrot Etienne (FRA) 2613 , Sarajevo 2000 It (cat.19)})

10… c5

( 10…Qg5 11.Bxf8 Kxf8 12.Nd2 Re8 13.Nf3 Qf5 14.g3 Nb4
15.O-O-O Nxa2+ 16.Kb2 Nb4 17.h4 d6 18.Bh3 Qf6 19.exf6 Rxe2+ 20.Kc3
Na2+ 21.Kd3 Rxf2 22.Rhf1 Nb4+ 23.Ke3 Rb2 24.Nd2 c5 25.Kf2 Bb7
26.Kg1 Nc2 27.Rf2 Nd4 28.Re1 h6 29.Bg2 Bxg2 30.Kxg2 {…0-1, Khader Sami (JOR) 2413 – Amin Bassem (EGY) 2505 , Abudhabi 8/15/2006 It (open)})

( 10…Qxa3 11.Nxa3 Bb4+ 12.Qd2 Bxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Ne7 14.Re1 Rf8
15.c5 Bxf1 16.Rhxf1 Rb8 17.Re4 Nd5 18.Ra4 Rb7 19.Re1 Ke7 20.Ree4
f6 21.exf6+ Kxf6 22.Nc4 Rd8 23.Ne5 Rb5 24.Ng4+ Kf7 25.Rxa7 Rxc5
26.a4 Nc3 27.Rf4+ Ke6 28.Ne3 Nb1+ 29.Ke2 Nc3+ 30.Kd3 {…1/2-1/2, Savchenko Boris (RUS) 2627 – Nabaty Tamir (ISR) 2526 , Bansko 12/16/2010 It (open)})

11.g3

( 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.f4 O-O 13.g3 Nb6 14.Bg2 Rad8 15.Nc3 Rfe8
16.Rb1 d5 17.Bf3 f6 18.Nb5 c6 19.Nd6 Rxd6 20.exd6 Qd7 21.Be5
fxe5 22.Bg4 Qxd6 23.O-O e4 24.Rfd1 d4 25.Bf3 d3 26.Qe1 Qe6 27.Bg2
Bd4+ 28.Kh1 Qe7 29.a4 Bc8 30.a5 Nd7 {…0-1, Murariu Andrei (ROM) 2503 – Smeets Jan (NED) 2619 , Verdun 1995 Ch Europe (juniors) (under 10)})

11… Bg7 ( 11…Nb6 12.Bg2 Rd8 13.Nd2 Bg7 14.Bb2 O-O 15.O-O Rfe8
16.Rfe1 d6 17.Bc6 Nd7 18.Nf3 dxe5 19.Rad1 f6 20.Ba3 Bf8 21.Qe3
Qe6 22.Bd5 {1-0, Knotkova Martina (CZE) – Koubkova Alena (CZE) 2038, Chrudim (Czech Republic) 1993})

12.f4

Position after 12. f4.

Position after 12. f4.

 

12… Nb4

13.Bg2 Rd8

14.Nc3 O-O

15.Bb2 d5

16.a3 d4

17.axb4 dxc3

18.Bxc3 cxb4

19.Bb2 Bc8

20.O-O

Position after 20. 0-0.

Position after 20. 0-0.

20… f6 {?} {This is just not a good move. It would have been much better for Wesley So to
simply redeploy his bishop to f5 then expose his king to Bd5+.}

21.Bd5+ {!} {Garry Kasparov takes advantage of his opponent’s self-inflicted weakness.}

21… Rxd5 {?} {Did Wesley So panic and miss his best chance for avoiding a loss? Perhaps Kasparov’s Scotch is too strong for So.}
( 21…Kh8 22.exf6 ( 22.Rxa7 fxe5 23.Bxe5 Bg4 24.Qb2
( 24.Qxg4 {?} Qc5+ 25.Kh1 Qxa7 ) ) Qc5+ 23.Qf2 Qxf2+ 24.Rxf2
Bxf6 )

Position after 21... Rxd5.

Position after 21… Rxd5.

22.cxd5

22… Qc5+

23.Rf2 fxe5

24.Bxe5 Bxe5

25.Qxe5 Rd8

26.Rd1 Bg4

27.Qd4 Qa5

28.Rdd2 Re8

29.Kg2 Qb5

30.h3 {Unsurprisingly, Garry Kasparov’s technique is still first-rate.}

Position after 30. h3.

Position after 30. h3.

 

30… Bf5

31.g4 Be4+

32.Kh2 c5

33.Qf6 ( 33.dxc6 Bxc6 34.Qxa7 {Is fine but Kasparov’s plan seems to win in a simpler fashion.})

33… c4

34.d6 ( 34.bxc4 Qd7 35.Qd4 b3 36.Rde2 {Is an alternative path to victory.})

34… Bc6

35.f5 {!} {Kasparov pushes So against the ropes!}

35… Rf8 {Kasparov has mate in 12.}

36.Qe6+ ( 36.Qe6+ Kg7 37.fxg6 Bf3 38.Qe7+ Kxg6 39.d7 Qb8+ 40.Rd6+
Qxd6+ 41.Qxd6+ Rf6 42.d8=Q Rxd6 43.Qxd6+ Kg7 44.Rxf3 h5 45.gxh5
a6 46.Qf8+ Kh7 47.Rf7#)

36… Kg7

37.d7 {Not the most accurate but perhaps the easiest continuation in a blitz game.}

37… Qc5

38.Qd6 ( 38…Qxd6+ 39.Rxd6 {and So has to choose between saving his bishop or allowing Kasparov to regain a queen.}) 1-0

Final Position.

Final Position.

 

 

Multi-Site Chess Tournament 

March 26, 2016

Northern California chess players are cordially invited to take part in a multi-site chess tournament on Saturday April 9th, 2016. The tournament site for California players is: 

Achiever Institute, 43475 Ellsworth Street Fremont, CA 94539 

  

1,000 Year-Old Chess Set to be Auctioned Off

March 16, 2016

  

The 10th-century chess set is believed to have been made in the city of Nishapur, now modern-day Iran, with several pieces equivalent to chess figures such as pawns, knights, kings and queens….

Read the full article via http://ift.tt/1TN5Gem

Harold Dondis, 93; Globe chess columnist beat Bobby Fischer

January 9, 2016

In March 1964, Harold Dondis was carried out of the Wachusett Chess Club in Fitchburg on the shoulders of his peers after he defeated future world champion Bobby Fischer. At the time, Mr….

Read the full article via http://ift.tt/1TKMlXR

The 2016 Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys

December 14, 2015

PowerPoint Presentation

 

The prestigious annual Susan Polgar Foundation National Open was created in 2006 in order to give more opportunities to young chess players in the United States. The 2016 SPFNO is an official qualifying event for the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Invitational for Girls and the 2016 FIDE World Youth Chess Championship. Entrants will be broken into sections by gender, age and rating. There will be $100,000 in prizes, which will include trophies, chess prizes, and college scholarships.

For more information or to apply online please visit:

www.SPFNO.com

#Chess #News: New Porsche 911 Ad Stars Magnus Carlsen

December 14, 2015


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