Archive for the ‘chess news’ Category

14-year-old R Praggnanandhaa crowned under-18 chess champion

October 14, 2019

“Praggnanandhaa scored an impressive and unbeaten 9/11 and he ended with a performance rating over 2700.

(Photo: Twitter/Chess.com India)

— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.deccanchronicle.com/amp/sports/in-other-news/131019/14-year-old-r-praggnanandhaa-crowned-under-18-chess-champion.html

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#Chess Position Worth Sharing 110

September 18, 2019

A remarkable position occurred after white played 47. Qxg3 in the game Samuel Sevian vs. Sergey Karjakin, FIDE World Cup 2019. Karjakin has only three legal responses as black and each would directly result in a different outcome (a win, a loss or a draw.)

Black to move and win, lose or draw! (Samuel Sevian – Sergey Karjakin, World Cup, Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, 2019.09.10.)

UCLA football hopes chess will help to checkmate opponents – Los Angeles Times

September 9, 2019

UCLA football hopes chess will help to checkmate opponents – Los Angeles Times

“Everyone is super physically gifted,” Makowsky told the news service, “but what begins to separate the elite top performers is how they process things, their mind-set, their mentality, how they can recognize patterns, how they can almost see five moves ahead.”

Makowsky, who has worked with Houston Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson and several Olympians, said what’s important is not the chess but how it applies to the principles of whatever sport the athletes play.

— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.latimes.com/sports/ucla/story/2019-08-19/ucla-football-fondness-chess-against-ncaa-competition?_amp=true

ChessKid To Attempt Chess World Record With GM Judit Polgar

September 1, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Palo Alto, Calif., Aug. 28, 2019—The world’s largest chess website for children will team with the greatest female chess player ever in an attempt to set an official Guinness world record for world’s largest chess tournament, the site announced today.

GM Judit Polgar, the strongest woman to ever play the game of chess, joins ChessKid in the record attempt, which will run from Sept. 1 to Oct. 5. Polgar will lead the ChessKid club that will organize the tournament.

All kids with a ChessKid account are invited to compete in the tournament and participate in the world record. To join the record-attempting tournament, go to https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club.

To set the record, ChessKid needs more than 20,000 individual children to compete in the tournament, said Mike Klein, the site’s chief chess officer.

The tournament will have two stages. The qualifying stage will begin on Sept. 1 and run through Oct. 5, and will constitute the record-setting attempt for largest chess tournament with 144 qualifiers.

There will be four last-chance “super-qualifiers” on the day of Polgar’s Global Chess Festival, which is October 12.

All kids qualifying from one of these 144 qualifiers will then play a final on October 19 at 8 a.m. Pacific time.

Any child who completes a single qualifier (all six rounds) will be counted toward the world record and will receive a special certificate from ChessKid signed by Judit Polgar. Participation in the finals is not required to count as part of the record.

As further incentive to play, ChessKid will randomly select one kid per qualifier (144 total) to receive one free year of ChessKid gold membership. Participants must play all six games of the qualifier to be eligible.

Five kids will be chosen at random to receive a signed copy of Judit Polgar’s book, How I Beat Fischer’s Record, and one lucky ChessKid will be randomly selected for a private lesson online with Polgar.

The top five finishers in the finals will also all receive a signed copy of the book, and will each get to play one blitz game against Polgar and one against Klein. The winner of the overall finals will also get one free online chess lesson with Polgar.

More prizes will be added later by local organizers and sponsors.

ChessKid will use all of its normal fair-play protection measures to ensure that games are played under the site’s guidelines.

Any child that is found to have used outside assistance or violated other policies will not be eligible for qualifying to the finals or any other prizes, and will also not have their participation count toward the record. All decisions made by ChessKid on fair-play cases are final.

By participating in the tournament, players agree they have their parent or guardian’s permission to play.

To join the world’s largest chess tournament and set the Guinness world record, join the Chesskid club at https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club. Players must join the club to register for a qualifier.

About ChessKid:
ChessKid is the world’s largest website for children to learn and play. ChessKid.com is specifically designed to be a safe and fun place for kids, while providing resources for parents and coaches.

About Judit Polgar:
Judit Polgar is universally considered the strongest female chess player of all time. A chess prodigy, Polgar earned the grandmaster title at age 14. She is the only woman in the history of chess to surpass the 2700 rating threshold and to qualify for a world championship tournament. Polgar is also an accomplished author, chess coach and ambassador of the game.

Contact:

Mike Klein

Chief Chess Officer, ChessKid.com
mike@chesskid.com

Pal Benko, Who Stepped Aside for Bobby Fischer, Dies at 91

August 27, 2019

Pal Benko, Who Stepped Aside for Bobby Fischer, Dies at 91

Pal Benko, a chess grandmaster who was among the world’s best players for two decades, but who gave up his place in the 1969-72 world championship cycle to Bobby Fischer, paving the way for Mr. Fischer to become world champion, died on Monday in Budapest. He was 91.

— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2019/08/26/sports/pal-benko-dead.amp.html

Summer Chess Camps Return to Fremont

June 10, 2019

Summer Chess Programs in Fremont

Sign up for any 1 week camp for ONLY $200 and your child will also receive:

** A 1 year gold membership to ChessKid.com (a $50 value)

** A copy of Learn Chess the Right Way by Susan Polgar (a $20 value)

** And two online private lessons with Chris Torres (an $80 value) at no extra charge.
That’s an additional $150 worth of educational chess products for no extra charge!

Visit www.fremontchess.com to register online

 

Each weekly chess camp is custom designed to give your child:

* The Valuable tools and skills needed to excel as a chess player.

* An extraordinary chess camp experience with a top-tier chess instructor.

* The confidence and motivation necessary to surpass their chess goals and fast track improvement.

In addition, as part of the camp experience, every child will receive a complimentary copy of Susan Polgar’s book “Learning Chess the Right Way” (a $20 value) as well as a gold membership to ChessKid.com (valued at $50.) In addition, we will also offer two free online lessons (valued at $40/hour) to every registered camp attendee in order to follow up with each child individually and ensure that they are still on track for rapid chess improvement.

For nearly a quarter century, Chris Torres has been teaming up with the biggest names in chess and education to bring top-tier chess instruction to the Bay Area at an incredible value. His meticulous approach has paved the way for the success of his students regardless of their entry skill level. A true leader in California chess, Chris Torres creates unique a curriculum perfectly suited for each and every class he teaches.

View his resume here: https://chessmusings.wordpress.com

 

Program Dates Times Address
P1 $200 Jun 17-21 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P2 $190 Jun 24-28 1:00-4:00 Warm Springs Community Park @ Crafts Room 47300 Fernald St, Fremont, CA
P3 $200 Jul 8-12 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P4 $200 Jul 15-17 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P5 $190 Jul 22-26 8:30-11:30 Teen Center @ Office 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont, CA
P6 $200 Jul 29- Aug 2 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P7 $200 Aug 5-9 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P8 $200 Aug 12-16 1:00-4:00 36496 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA
P9 $190 Aug 19-23 9:00-12:00 Warm Springs Community Park @ Crafts Room 47300 Fernald St, Fremont, CA

Please contact Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com if you have any questions. Checks should be made payable to the TCAMA 16691 Colonial Trail, Lathrop, CA, 95330, OR visit http://www.fremontchess.com/ to register online.

 

2019 Lathrop Mayor’s Cup Chess Tournament

May 1, 2019

Dear Parents,

It is my great pleasure to invite your children to participate in the 2019 Lathrop Mayor’s Cup chess tournament at River Islands Technology Academy. Many of your children enjoy chess and will be excited to compete against other young chess players from around our region.

The date of this tournament is May 11 and round 1 will begin at 9:30am. All participants will play four rounds and Lathrop’s Mayor, Sonny Dhaliwal, will arrive at 2:00pm to hand out awards. Because of a generous donation from the River Islands Development Team and our tournament staff donating their time, there is no cost to register for this exciting event. Additionally, we will be selling lots of tasty treats and pizza slices to raise funds for the Torres Chess and Music Academy’s other projects in the area.

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

Register online at

www.ChessAndMusic.com

Chess Chat: Q&A with Devanshi Rathi, UC Berkeley Student and Nonprofit Founder

April 16, 2019

Devanshi Rathi is a current undergraduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a passionate chess player and enjoys playing and watching different sports. Her mission in life is to create a positive difference in the world around her. She is trying to do that through her foundation, the Devanshi Rathi Foundation, a registered non-profit company. In her free time, she likes to write about sports and loves to take interviews of different players because it leaves her inspired.

How old were you when you first learned how to play chess? Who taught you?

I was eight years old (in 2008) when I first learnt how to play chess. I learnt from my school coach and via self-practice in the beginning.

How has chess effected your decision making process off the board?

Chess has definitely helped my decision making process off the board. I try to strategize and plan my ‘moves’ well in advance before actually ‘playing’ them. Obviously, I don’t always go according to my original plan, but that happens most of the times in chess as well.

How did your earlier career choices lead you to where you are now?

I am not sure about this. I tried to turn into a professional chess player, or at least was working towards it for about a year and a half, but I had other interests and passions in life that always made me distracted. To become a professional, one needs sole focus on the game, and I just couldn’t do that. Moreover, my multiple interests led me to pursue a major in college that is independently designed, and I’m currently working on how I can get an effective research proposal in order to declare the same.

How would you define your chess style?

I think it would be aggressive and attacking. I don’t like to defend that much, maybe I’m not that good at it!

Does your chess style transfer over into your business decisions as well?

Yes, but I feel that I tend to be more combinatory in my business decisions. Too much aggression in the business field can cost one a lot.

What has been your worst chess mistake which has given you the biggest lesson?

My worst chess mistake would be to not participate in a number of tournaments in my earlier years. I practiced myself instead of playing in different events. It has made me realise that one must make the most of one’s current time and not think too much in advance. It is the same in chess- one shouldn’t go so deep in their calculations that we lose sight of the current position.

Do you think chess has helped you to become more resilient in life?

Yes, of course! Participating in competitions definitely helps one to get more resilient and that reciprocates into one’s personal life as well, according to my experience.

What do you hope to achieve professionally during the next couple of years?

I am currently exploring my options. I’m taking a diverse set of classes for my interdisciplinary major and can only see what happens as it happens. Not planning too much at the moment. This could be a contradiction to what I said earlier about me planning well in advance. However, this is a situation where I feel that the more ‘time’ you take, the better move you would ‘play’.

What is the biggest challenge to achieving that goal?

As I don’t know the goal yet, the biggest challenge would be to find my path.

How would you relate these goals and challenges to the chessboard?

In chess, one needs to find the real path to victory and that can take the whole game. Similarly, I’m taking my time to decide.

Could you please leave us with a favorite piece of chess wisdom to conclude this interview?

Chess is an ocean where an ant can swim and an elephant can drown.

Thanks a lot for giving me this opportunity to do this interview!

To find out more about the Devanshi Rathi Foundation and Project Checkmate, please visit: https://projectcheckmate.weebly.com/

Fremont Scholastic Chess Championship a Success

March 25, 2019

FremontChess.com held it’s annual Scholastic Chess Championship on March 16th and 17th at the Learning Bee Learning Center in Fremont, California.   Nearly fifty children participated in the event to share their passion for chess while competing for the title of Fremont Chess Champion.

The tournament which was a combined effort between US Chess Mates and the Torres Chess and Music Academy had an entry fee of only $20 thanks to the generous sponsorship of Grace Wong (Director of the Learning Bee Learning Center) and Joe Lonsdale (The Head Coach for Mission San Jose Elementary School Chess Team).

The K-1 section provided Fremont’s newest chess players a stage to show off their impressive skills on. And impress they did! Pranavi Pramod and Suhas Indukuri led the way with 3.5/4. Other players who performed admirably are Karanveer Singh Saran, Davin Lazar Vinod, Eayon Hsu and Emmett Zhao.

The largest and most competitive was grades 2-4. Joshua Huang won first place with 4.5/5 followed closely Dhruv Sheth with 4/5. From a tournament director’s standpoint, this group was a pleasure to watch. There was at least one interesting game to watch every round. It was wonderful to see so much up and coming talent.

The 5-8’th grade featured many excellent players but none played as well as eighth-grader Arjun Ganesan who achieved the only perfect score in the entire tournament. Second place went to Hemanth Kumar Merugu whose only loss was to Arjun. I have no doubt that all of the competitors in this section are destined for great things in Middle School, High School and beyond.

As the organizer for the Fremont Scholastic Chess Championship, I want to take one more moment to thank all the players, chess parents and sponsors for making this tournament possible. As a Fremont native, it was a special privilege for me to serve Fremont’s up and coming chess stars.

Chess Chat: Q&A with Jessica Lauser, U.S. Blind Champion

March 4, 2019

Jessica Lauser hails from Northern California’s San Francisco Bay Area, and has been an avid participant in tournament chess, both there and elsewhere, for a number of years, playing 175 rated events throughout the country, so far.

A graduate, in History, from San Francisco State University, Jessica worked for the Internal Revenue Service—last year—and now for a nonprofit organization servicing contract(s) for the U.S. Marine Corps.

Being legally-blind since birth, chess has provided her a means to attain equality and achieve success, hopefully inspiring others, along the way.

It has not been easy, but Jessica has qualified, several times now, to represent the U.S. in various competitions, overseas. These include World Blind Olympiads, the IBCA Women’s World Championship, and, most recently, the IBCA Men’s/Overall World Championship.

Jessica’s goal is to become the first blind women’s master in the United States, and to achieve a solid ranking among the top blind players in the world.

As always, Jessica appreciates the encouragement and support of the chess community, and she looks forward to making her own contribution to the ongoing improvement of others, as well.

How old were you when you first learned how to play chess? Who taught you?

I was seven, when I first learned to play chess, although it would be a few years—by about age twelve or so—before I fully understood such things as en passant. I learned from the principal of my elementary school, who was teaching only a few students at the time, since I came along well ahead of many of the chess programs that later formed in the schools, which became popular, throughout the country.

How has chess effected your decision making process off the board?

 

While chess has certainly helped me consider cause-and-effect relationships, there are countless aspects to decision-making—besides pure logic—that an understanding of chess doesn’t begin to help unravel. Alas, Life is infinitely more complex. Emotional, moral, and ethical, considerations, for example, can go into any number of decisions one may face, as an adult, and chess, it would seem, really requires much of the emotions and other elements to be absent from the process, to be effective.  

How did your earlier career choices lead you to where you are now?

 

As for career choices, I’m afraid I’m still working on that. Having a lifelong and permanent disability—moderate blindness, in my case—has significantly delayed things, in terms of both my education and career. Though I’ve always worked, or tried to be employed while also attending college, most of my jobs were part-time and student-oriented (campus IT, Library, etc.), until I finally graduated, in 2016. After doing so, I, eventually, spent time working for the IRS, before hiring on as a civilian contractor under a nonprofit agency assisting the U.S. Marine Corps.

How would you define your chess style?

 

Concerning chess style, I would have to say I’m very tactical, but have been known to find positional weaknesses I occasionally exploit. Perhaps for this reason, I tend towards a much stronger performance with far less time, than with more, resulting in an incredible disparity between my speed and slow ratings: a peak of 2048 (Blitz), as opposed to that of 1700 (Regular). Of course, it’s especially fun to beat not only male, but also fully-sighted, opponents.

 

Does your chess style transfer over into your business decisions as well?

I would say that my chess style probably influences other areas of my life, including work, in that, more than once, I’ve made major decisions—like moving across the country to take a job, and even changing states again, several months later—for the potential future benefits that doing so could afford. A big motivator, for example, has involved student loan forgiveness.

What has been your worst chess mistake which has given you the biggest lesson?

My worst chess mistake was probably not becoming the 2011 Alaska State Champion. Despite having a much higher-rated opponent on the ropes, I allowed my fear that he had some hidden resource I simply couldn’t see, to cause me to make a more passive, defending move. Instead of playing more aggressively in the endgame, which I would have done had this match taken place on the streets of San Francisco, this mistake netted me second place, down from clear first. What I learned, however, was, should I find myself playing for a title—whether state or national—when I reach the critical position of not only the game, but quite possibly the whole event, to just stop and re-evaluate whatever it is I’m seeing. Thankfully, I used this technique to great effect, in both the 2018 Kentucky Closed Women’s State Championship and the 2018 U.S. Blind Championship. I outright won both events, and even made history, becoming the first-ever female U.S. Blind Champion.

What has been your worst career mistake that has given you the biggest lesson?

 

As for my worst career mistake, I can’t say that I’ve made one, so much as I’ve had mostly jobs and no career, so far. Even so, I’m still making continued efforts at finding a career, as there exists a huge unemployment rate among folks with blindness—anywhere from 70-90% of us do not work and most cannot support themselves without assistance—so it feels good to be among a very few who are “making it”, living independently. The biggest lesson, I suppose, involves never giving up, always having a goal to pursue. While I’m currently employed, for instance, my job is contract-based, so it will end, I just don’t know when that will be. Meanwhile, I’m inching towards my second BA, in hopes of transitioning into work that uses my ears—something involving Russian—so I can enjoy greater confidence, in the future, should I experience further vision-loss.

 

Do you think chess has helped you to become more resilient in life?

While chess has definitely helped me be more resilient in life, it is my strong Christian faith that has sustained me during the most difficult times I have known. Likewise, the support of family and encouragement from others I have met has made the journey more bearable.

Jessica Lauser after winning the 2018 U.S. Blind Championship.

What do you hope to achieve professionally during the next couple of years?

 

As for professional achievements in the next couple years, I’d have to say to GET a profession would be nice. (For now, I’m simply working, but given a number of difficult challenges I am facing, currently—lack of transportation where I live/work, the astronomical cost of Lyft/Uber twice a day, if not averaging more, and, being essentially isolated as a result—morale and budget, aren’t exactly up to par.) It would be nice to not only be well-paid for what I do, but also to not have every dime I bring in essentially eaten up with what it takes to survive and get to/from work.

 

What is the biggest challenge to achieving that goal?

The biggest challenge, of course, is the stigma of blindness that follows me into every job, school/housing situation I encounter, and even interpersonal relationships. Physically incapable of perceiving nonverbal communication when interacting with others—and being largely uncomfortable socializing outside of chess, anyway—has created marked difficulty for me, in making friends and participating socially, in general. For this reason, I experience a reality quite similar to those with Autism, and it has actually been suggested that I am on the Spectrum.

 

How would you relate these goals and challenges to the chessboard?

Relating my goals and challenges to the chessboard would be to simplify them, ridiculously, making resulting analogies inadequate, at best. For example, a large part of decisions I have made, over the years, were dependent on things was told, by others, causing all kinds of problems, if and when these facts were either inaccurate, or simply untrue. Most recently, myself and other employees were told there were buses to get around the area we each relocated to, from other states, for our jobs. This statement couldn’t be further from the truth, costing us a tremendous amount of time, or hundreds of dollars extra, each month, making us wonder if moving all this way was worth it, given how we are out all kinds of money, just for the pleasure of working.

 

Could you please leave us with a favorite piece of chess wisdom to conclude this interview?

For my favorite piece of chess wisdom, I would have to say, no matter what, be sure to keep chess in the proper perspective. While we LOVE this game, and we derive immense pleasure from practicing and playing it, ultimately it is not our devotion to the 64 squares that defines us, but rather what we do, outside of chess—in Real Life—since our Great Game is only part of all we do along the way. There are far more important things to consider, like faith and family, friends and the future. In this respect, I think the saddest thing is when we take the chess out of the player, and there is literally nothing left of that person. This is why it’s important to cultivate one’s life, in a number of different areas of interest, not only to broaden one’s horizons, but also to allow for personal growth beyond what is either familiar or comfortable.  


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