Archive for the ‘Children's Chess’ Category

Basic Chess Strategy

January 12, 2020

Question: What are some common chess strategies?

Answer: Below is a list of chess strategies known as Reuben Fine’s “Thirty Rules of Chess”. Chess is a complicated game and there will always be exceptions to any rule. However, it is a good exercise to understand why each item below is generally recognized as good chess strategy and to employ these rules in your own games.

TEN OPENING RULES

  1. OPEN with a CENTER PAWN.
  2. DEVELOP with threats.
  3. KNIGHTS before BISHOPS.
  4. DON’T move the same piece twice.
  5. Make as FEW PAWN MOVES as possible in the opening.
  6. DON’T bring out your QUEEN too early.
  7. CASTLE as soon as possible, preferably on the KING SIDE.
  8. ALWAYS PLAY TO GAIN CONTROL OF THE CENTER.
  9. Try to maintain at least ONE PAWN in the center.
  10. DON’T SACRIFICE without a clear and adequate reason.

For a sacrificed pawn you must:
a)
 GAIN THREE TEMPI,
b)
 DEFLECT the enemy QUEEN,
c)
 PREVENT CASTLING,
d)
 BUILD UP a strong attack.

TEN MIDDLEGAME RULES

  1. Have all your moves fit into definite plans.
    Rules of Planing:

a) A plan MUST be suggested by SOME FEATURE IN THE POSITION.
b) A plan
 MUST be based on SOUND STRATEGIC PRINCIPLES.
c) A plan
 MUST be FLEXIBLE,
d)
 CONCRETE, and
e)
 SHORT.

Evaluating a Position:

1) MATERIAL,
2)
 PAWN STRUCTURE,
3)
 PIECE MOBILITY,
4)
 KING SAFETY,
5)
 ENEMY THREATS

  1. When you are material AHEAD, EXCHANGEas many pieces as possible, especially QUEENS.
  2. AVOID serious pawn WEAKNESSES.
  3. In CRAMPED POSITIONS free yourself by EXCHANGING.
  4. DON’T bring your KING out with your OPPONENT’S QUEEN on the board.
  5. All COMBINATIONS are based on DOUBLE ATTACK.
  6. If your opponent has ONE or MOREpieces EXPOSED, look for a COMBINATION.
  7. IN SUPERIOR POSITIONS, to ATTACKthe ENEMY KING, you must OPEN a file (or less often a diagonal) for your HEAVY PIECES (QUEEN and ROOKS).
  8. IN EVEN POSITIONS, CENTRALIZE the action of ALL your PIECES.
  9. IN INFERIOR POSITIONS, the best DEFENSE is COUNTER-ATTACK, if possible.

TEN ENDGAMES RULES

  1. To win WITHOUT PAWNS, you must be at least a ROOK or TWO MINOR PIECESahead (two knight excepted).
  2. The KING must be ACTIVE in the ENDING.
  3. PASSED PAWNS must be PUSHED (PPMBP).
  4. The EASIEST endings to win are PURE PAWNendings.
  5. If you are ONLY ONE PAWN ahead, EXCHANGE PIECES, not pawns.
  6. DON’T place your PAWNS on the SAME COLOR SQUARES as your BISHOP.
  7. BISHOPS are BETTER than KNIGHTS in all but BLOCKED pawn positions.
  8. It is usually worth GIVING UP A PAWN to get a ROOK ON THE SEVENTH RANK.
  9. ROOKS belong BEHIND PASSED PAWNS (RBBPP).
  10. BLOCKADE PASSED PAWNS with the KING.

Source: https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-common-chess-strategies/answer/Chris-Torres-13?ch=10&share=a594e89b&srid=i4Sz

Obstructionist at the Chessboard

December 22, 2019

Question: What kind of chess player do other chess players dislike?

Answer: Sadly, there are players of the trollish influence that after acknowledging they have lost, will neither leave nor move. If tournament directors inform me that any of my chess students engaged in such unsportsmanlike conduct, they are immediately suspended from our clubs. Unfortunately, other coaches/clubs/websites don’t take such a strong stance and therefore chess players are regularly victimized by such clock trolling…https://www.quora.com/What-kind-of-chess-player-do-other-chess-players-dislike/answer/Chris-Torres-13?ch=10&share=6062885f&srid=i4Sz

FremontChess.Com Quads 12/21/19

December 21, 2019

The Torres Chess and Music Academy and the Learning Bee Learning Center Present:

FremontChess.com

Saturday Quads

December 21st

Where: Learning Bee Learning Center, 39977 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539

When: December 21, 2019 R1 @ 1:00 pm (Please check in by 12:45)

What: Scholastic (K-12) 3 Round Quad – G/30 d5

Cost: $30/quad

USCF Rated QUAD Format : All players must be USCF members. All players must understand USCF tournament rules. USCF Membership fee is $17, per year. QUAD Format – The players in each quad play a round robin, one game against each of the players in their section, for a total of three games each. Quads are created by rating, grade and experience. All quads will be Game in 30 min +5 second delay (each player). Sets and boards provided. Clocks will be provided, but players are encouraged to bring their own. Trophies are awarded to top player in each quad. All other players will receive a prize for participating and free game analysis.

*Round Times : R 1 @ 1:00pm R 2 @ 2:00pm R 3 @ 3:00pm

Trophies awarded at the conclusion of each quad.

REGISTER HERE

Betcha Can Solve This #Chess Puzzle!

December 21, 2019

This one is really not as hard as it looks. White to move and mate in 6 (Wilhelm Ropke, 1942.)

White to move and mate in 6 (Wilhelm Ropke, 1942.)

Two Hands Aren’t Better Than One

December 9, 2019

Was playing with both hands ever allowed in chess?

You can play chess with either hand or both if you choose. The standard that you need to press the clock with the same hand that you use to move the pieces is there to keep players from touching the clock before they have finished the move….

https://www.quora.com/Was-playing-with-both-hands-ever-allowed-in-chess/answer/Chris-Torres-13?ch=10&share=892dc98a&srid=i4Sz

Asking Questions

November 26, 2019

He who asks a question, remains a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask, remains a fool forever!

Changes to US Chess Federation Junior High Nationals

November 21, 2019

Announcement from the United States Chess Federation regarding changes to the structure of the Junior High Nationals:

In June 2019, the Scholastic Council formed a subcommittee of the Scholastic Committee to examine the current structure of the Junior High Nationals. This nine-person subcommittee from across the country examined data from the last four years and discussed the impact of any proposed changes, including projections of both section and grade restructuring. Their extensive report recommended a two-step process: (1) Immediate move to one K-9 Championship section and adding new class sections; and (2) Effective no earlier than 2022, the intent to transition Junior High Nationals to K-8. 

Key findings:

1. New class sections are immediately needed that will increase opportunities for all eligible players rated under 1700 and encourage the growth of chess at Junior High Nationals at every level. Meanwhile, the new championship section can be more competitive and ideal for all the top players and teams in the country. This restructuring would be consistent with previous section changes to the National High School in 2015 and National Elementary in 2016, which added new class sections to reflect the increased competition at all levels of the game.

2. Restructuring into one K-9 Championship section is more appropriate given that the event did not have a significant number of 9th graders and the current size of Junior High Nationals. Keeping the two championship sections with the addition of a higher class section would result in sections that would be too small.

3. An immediate change to one K-8 Championship section, thereby making Junior High Nationals K-8, would not be fair to the current field of participants without proper notice. 

4. Since the Junior High Nationals were first created, more middle and junior high schools around the country have transitioned to going up to only 8 th grade.

Based on the recommendation of the subcommittee and further discussion at the 2019 U.S. Open, the first step of restructuring the event as outlined below was recommended by the Scholastic Council and approved by the Executive Board and is effective for the 2020 Junior High Nationals: 

K9 Championship

K9 U1700

K9 U1400

K9 U1100

K9 U900

K9 U700

K9 UNRATED

The second step toward transitioning Junior High Nationals to K-8 sections is actively being discussed and is intended to be effective no earlier than 2022 Junior High Nationals. The subcommittee will remain active during this transition.

If anyone wants further information on the process or would like to provide feedback, please reach out to the chair of the Sections subcommittee, Daniel Rohde, at Daniel.G.Rohde@gmail.com , who will circulate any feedback to the subcommittee and the Scholastic Council.

FremontChess.Com Chess Quads, November 16th

November 6, 2019

The Torres Chess and Music Academy and the Learning Bee Learning Center Present:

FremontChess.com Saturday Quads on November 16

Where: Learning Bee Learning Center, 39977 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539 When: November 16, 2019 R1 @ 1:00 pm

What: Scholastic (K-12) 3 Round Quad – G/30 d5

Cost: $30/quad A $10 late fee will be added if you register after 5pm the day

before the quad

USCF Rated QUAD Format: All players must be USCF members. All players must understand USCF tournament rules. USCF Membership fee is $17, per year. QUAD

Format – The players in each quad play a round robin, one game against each of the players in their section, for a total of three games each. Quads are created by rating, grade and experience. All quads will be Game in 30 min +5 second delay (each player). Sets and boards provided. Clocks will be provided, but players are encouraged to bring their own. Trophies are awarded to top player in each quad. All other players will receive a prize for participating and free game analysis.

*Round Times: R 1 @ 1:00pm R 2 @ 2:00pm R 3 @ 3:00pm

Trophies awarded at the conclusion of each quad.

Register at www.FremontChess.com

Message for a Friend

October 26, 2019

Regardless of your efforts, stress and losses are an inescapable part of life and chess. Because of this, chess helps us effectively train to deal with the challenges we face in life. However, sometimes all that can be done is to seek to learn from mistakes and try to find meaning in disappointing experiences. For the most painful experiences, try to learn about personal limitations/capabilities as well as gain compassion for others who are suffering in similar or more extreme situations. You are not alone in your experience and unlike chess, overthinking your position will cause more harm than good.

ChessKid To Attempt Chess World Record With GM Judit Polgar

September 1, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Palo Alto, Calif., Aug. 28, 2019—The world’s largest chess website for children will team with the greatest female chess player ever in an attempt to set an official Guinness world record for world’s largest chess tournament, the site announced today.

GM Judit Polgar, the strongest woman to ever play the game of chess, joins ChessKid in the record attempt, which will run from Sept. 1 to Oct. 5. Polgar will lead the ChessKid club that will organize the tournament.

All kids with a ChessKid account are invited to compete in the tournament and participate in the world record. To join the record-attempting tournament, go to https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club.

To set the record, ChessKid needs more than 20,000 individual children to compete in the tournament, said Mike Klein, the site’s chief chess officer.

The tournament will have two stages. The qualifying stage will begin on Sept. 1 and run through Oct. 5, and will constitute the record-setting attempt for largest chess tournament with 144 qualifiers.

There will be four last-chance “super-qualifiers” on the day of Polgar’s Global Chess Festival, which is October 12.

All kids qualifying from one of these 144 qualifiers will then play a final on October 19 at 8 a.m. Pacific time.

Any child who completes a single qualifier (all six rounds) will be counted toward the world record and will receive a special certificate from ChessKid signed by Judit Polgar. Participation in the finals is not required to count as part of the record.

As further incentive to play, ChessKid will randomly select one kid per qualifier (144 total) to receive one free year of ChessKid gold membership. Participants must play all six games of the qualifier to be eligible.

Five kids will be chosen at random to receive a signed copy of Judit Polgar’s book, How I Beat Fischer’s Record, and one lucky ChessKid will be randomly selected for a private lesson online with Polgar.

The top five finishers in the finals will also all receive a signed copy of the book, and will each get to play one blitz game against Polgar and one against Klein. The winner of the overall finals will also get one free online chess lesson with Polgar.

More prizes will be added later by local organizers and sponsors.

ChessKid will use all of its normal fair-play protection measures to ensure that games are played under the site’s guidelines.

Any child that is found to have used outside assistance or violated other policies will not be eligible for qualifying to the finals or any other prizes, and will also not have their participation count toward the record. All decisions made by ChessKid on fair-play cases are final.

By participating in the tournament, players agree they have their parent or guardian’s permission to play.

To join the world’s largest chess tournament and set the Guinness world record, join the Chesskid club at https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club. Players must join the club to register for a qualifier.

About ChessKid:
ChessKid is the world’s largest website for children to learn and play. ChessKid.com is specifically designed to be a safe and fun place for kids, while providing resources for parents and coaches.

About Judit Polgar:
Judit Polgar is universally considered the strongest female chess player of all time. A chess prodigy, Polgar earned the grandmaster title at age 14. She is the only woman in the history of chess to surpass the 2700 rating threshold and to qualify for a world championship tournament. Polgar is also an accomplished author, chess coach and ambassador of the game.

Contact:

Mike Klein

Chief Chess Officer, ChessKid.com
mike@chesskid.com


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