Archive for the ‘Chris Torres’ Category

Top Guitar Vines (2016)

February 21, 2017

A mountain of evidence is available that points to the fact that chess and music are extremely beneficial activities for children. Therefore I don’t believe it’s coincidental that chess and music produce child prodigies with a much greater frequency than that of other intellectual pursuits. This is why the mission of the Torres Chess and Music Academy is to provide the very best chess and music instruction to the most children possible.

Below is a video demonstrating ten songs I taught to my guitar students over the last few years. These songs also happened to be my most popular guitar Vine videos from 2016. Enjoy…

More Fighting Chess from the 2016 Chess Olympiad

September 6, 2016

Today’s featured game from the 2016 Chess Olympiad includes an attack straight out of a chess hustler’s playbook which leads to a victory in just 27 moves. Hats off to Bader Al-Hajiri (Kuwait) and Rodwell Makoto (Zimbabwe) for playing such an entertaining game. Enjoy…

 

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.5”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Al-Hajiri, Bader”]
[Black “Makoto, Rodwell”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C48”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ FOUR KNIGHTS’ GAME,C48]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Nc3 Nf6

4.Bb5 Bc5

5.Nxe5

 

Position after 5. Nxe5

Position after 5. Nxe5

 

5… O-O {!?}

( 5…Nxe5 6.d4 {The Fork Trick} Bd6 7.f4 (7.dxe5 Bxe5 8.Be3 c6 9.Be2 O-O) 8.  Nc6 8.e5 {The Fork Trick: Part Two} O-O 9.exd6 Re8+
{And oddly enough, black is fine.} )

( 5…Bxf2+ {?!} 6.Kxf2 Nxe5 7.d4 Ng6 ( 7…Nfg4+ 8.Ke1 c6 9.dxe5 d6 10.Be2 Nxe5 11.Bf4
{and white is winning.} ) ( 7…Neg4+ 8.Kg1 c6 9.Be2 d5 10.exd5
O-O 11.dxc6 bxc6 12.h3 Nh6 13.g4 {I’d be happy to play as white from here.}) 8.e5 c6 9.exf6 {!} Qxf6+ 10.Qf3 Qxf3+ 11.gxf3 cxb5 12.Re1+
Kd8 13.Nxb5 {and white is better.} )

6.Nf3

( 6.O-O Nxe5 7.d4 Bd6 8.f4 Nc6 9.e5 Bb4 10.exf6 Qxf6 11.Nd5 Qxd4+ 12.Be3 Qxd1 13.Raxd1
Bd6 14.f5 f6 15.Bf4 Ne5 16.Bxe5 fxe5 17.f6 c6 18.Ne7+ Bxe7 19.fxe7
Re8 20.Bc4+ d5 21.Rxd5 cxd5 22.Bxd5+ Be6 23.Bxe6+ Kh8 24.Rf7
h5 25.Kf2 Kh7 {…1-0, Kulaots Kaido (EST) 2581 – Roiz Michael (ISR) 2652 , Plovdiv 3/22/2012 Ch Europe})

( 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.Nf3 Nxe4 8.Nxe4 Re8 9.d3 f5 10.O-O fxe4 11.dxe4
Bg4 12.Qe2 )

6… Nd4

7.Nxd4 ( 7.Be2 Nxe2 8.Qxe2 d5 9.d3 Bb4 10.e5
Re8 11.O-O Bg4 {Looks like a fun position for both colors.} )

7… Bxd4

8.Ne2 {?} {Bader Ali-Hajiri is asking for trouble with this move. Better was:}
( 8.O-O Re8 9.Be2 Bxc3 10.dxc3 Nxe4 )

 

Position after 8. Ne2

Position after 8. Ne2

 

8… Bxf2+ {!} {Rodwell Makoto responds with fire.}

9.Kxf2 Nxe4+

10.Ke1 Qf6 {Attacks like these are usually reserved for the street chess hustlers. I’m taking notes.}

11.Rf1 Qh4+

12.Ng3 Re8 {Threatening a discovered check with Nc3 which wins the queen.}

 

Position after 12... Re8

Position after 12… Re8

 

13.Be2 Nxg3 {Not sure I agree with voluntarily trading pieces here. Black is attacking and
therefor should be looking to bring in more force not remove it.}

14.hxg3 Qxg3+

15.Rf2 {Bader Al-Hajiri has done a fine job weathering Rodwell Makoto’s creative attack.}

15… d5

16.Kf1 {?} {Unpinning the rook and bishop by stepping aside is tempting but now when
black’s queen moves to h2 white will be in serious trouble. Much better was:}
( 16.d4 Qh2 17.Bf4 Qg1+ 18.Rf1 Qxg2 19.Rf2 Qg1+ 20.Rf1 Qg2 {draw by repetition.})

 

Position after 16. Kf1

Position after 16. Kf1

 

16… Qh2 {!}

17.Rf3 Bg4 ( 17…d4 18.d3 Bg4 19.c3
Re6 20.Bf4 Qh1+ 21.Kf2 Rxe2+ 22.Qxe2 Qxa1 {is another way to go about the attack.})

18.a4 {?} {Trying to make up for his earlier mistakes, Beder Al-Hajiri will try to get
both of his rooks unified in the third rank. This is a very unusual plan and unfortunately, for Al-Hajiri, not very effective.}

( 18.Re3 {Exchanging the queens and freeing the pieces was a much better plan for white.}
Qh1+ 19.Kf2 Qxd1 20.Bxd1 Bxd1 21.d4 c6 22.c3 f6 23.Bd2 )

18… Re6

19.Raa3 {Bader Al-Hajiri has accomplished his goal behind playing 18. a4.}

 

Position after 19. Raa3

Position after 19. Raa3

 

19… d4 {!} {With one pawn push, Rodwell Makoto takes away his opponent’s chances of placing
a rook into the open e-file. This is a crushing blow to white.}

20.Rh3 {Bader Al-Hajiri tries to resurrect some purpose for his rooks being in the third rank.}

20… Rf6+

21.Rhf3 ( 21.Raf3 Bxh3 22.gxh3 Rg6 23.Ke1 Re8 {is even worse for black.})

21… Re8 {Rodwell Makoto has four pieces left and they are all involved in the attack on Bader Al-Hajiri’s king.}

22.Kf2 Qh4+

23.Kg1 Rfe6

24.g3 Qh5

25.Bf1 {?} {Its impossible to defend against such force with such a disorganized position. However, Rfe3 was the more accurate choice.} ( 25.Rfe3 Bxe2 26.Qxe2 Qxe2 27.Rxe2 Rxe2 28.Rf3 )

 

Position after 25. Bf1

Position after 25. Bf1

 

25… Re1{!} {Just crushing.}

26.Rae3 R8xe3

27.Rxe3 Rxe3 {and Bader Al-Hajiri resigns as his queen is trapped.}
0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Hidden Gems Abound at the 2016 Chess Olympiads

September 4, 2016

One of my favorite hobbies is treasure hunting for beautifully instructive chess games during the annual Chess Olympiads. With more than 180 countries each sending their best male and female teams to compete in one event, the Chess Olympiads is a veritable mother load of chess gems. For hunting these chess treasures, I follow along at:

The official site for the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads

http://www1.bakuchessolympiad.com//

 

 

Chess Daily News

https://chessdailynews.com

 

ChessGames.com

http://www.chessgames.com/index.html

 

FM Qiu Zhou of Canada

FM Qiyu Zhou of Canada

And to illustrate just the kind of hidden gems I am talking about, I present Sindira Joshi (Nepal) vs. Qiyu Zhou (Canada) from round 1 of the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads. Enjoy…

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.2”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Joshi, Sindira”]
[Black “Zhou, Qiyu”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C54”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C54]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {The start to the Scotch.}

3… exd4

4.Bc4 Bc5

5.c3 {Transposing to a Giuoco Piano.}

5… Nf6

6.cxd4 Bb4+

7.Bd2 {White could have also chosen the equally popular Moeller Attack by playing Nc3 and gambitting the e-pawn.}

( 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 O-O 11.Rxe4 Ne7 12.d6
cxd6 13.Qxd6 Nf5 14.Qd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bxg5 16.Nxg5 Qxg5 17.Qxf7+
{1-0, Euwe Max (NED) – Van Mindeno A, Netherlands 1927 It “AVRO”} )

 

Position after 7. Bd2

Position after 7. Bd2

 

7… Nxe4

8.Bxb4 Nxb4

9.Bxf7+ Kxf7

10.Qb3+ d5 {Discovered by Gioachino Greco, this line is a mere 400 years old.}

 

Position after 10... d5

Position after 10… d5

 

11.Qxb4 {Greco preffered Ne5+ here.}

11… Rf8

12.Nc3 {So far so good for the much lower rated Sindira Joshi. Her chances are about equal here.}
( 12.O-O Ng5 13.Ne5+ Kg8 14.Nc3 c6 15.f4 Nf7 16.Ne2 Nd6 17.Ng3
a5 18.Qa3 a4 19.Qb4 a3 20.bxa3 Nb5 21.a4 Qd6 22.Rab1 Qxb4 23.Rxb4
Nc3 24.Rb3 Nxa4 25.Ne2 Ra6 26.g3 Nb6 27.Nc3 Na4 28.Ne2 Nb6 29.Nc3
Nc4 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Rb4 b5 {…1/2-1/2, Schaefer Markus (GER) 2390 – Postny Evgeny (ISR) 2595 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club})

12… Nxc3 13.bxc3 {?} {A slight innacuracy. Better was Qxc3 as seen in this game:}

( 13.Qxc3 Kg8 14.O-O Qd6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Rae1 Rae8 17.Re3 Re6 18.Rfe1
Ref6 19.b4 {1/2-1/2, Danilenko Dmitriy (UKR) 1992 – Pavlov Maxim (UKR) 2327 , Alushta 5/18/2006 Ch Ukraine (1/2 final)})

13… Kg8

14.Ne5 {?} {Another harmless looking mistake. Much better was h4 to prevent Qg5.}

 

Position after 14. Ne5

Position after 14. Ne5

 

14… Qg5 {Here comes trouble.}

15.g3 {?} {As dangerous as it looks, castling is to be preferred here.}

15… Rxf2 {!} {Qiyu Zhou starts her combination with a beautiful rook sacrifice.}

 

Position after 15.... Rxf2

Position after 15…. Rxf2

 

16.Kxf2 Qd2+

17.Kf3 Bh3 {Qiyu Zhou is putting on a tactical clinic.}

 

Position after 15... Bh3

Position after 15… Bh3

 

18.Rad1 {Sindira Joshi seems to be playing the most accurate responses but Qiyu Zhou continues to press her advantage.}

18… Bg2+

19.Kg4 Qe2+

20.Kh4 Bxh1 {Not just to win the exchange but also to set up a vicious fork.}

 

Position after 20... Bxh1

Position after 20… Bxh1

 

21.Rxh1 Qe4+ {and now Sindira Joshi’s only chance is to hope for a rare blunder from Qiyu Zhou.}

22.Kh3 Qxh1 {Qiyu Zhou concludes the prefectly executed 8 move combination.}

23.Qe7 {Sindira Joshi finally has a choice but it is to pick her own poison.}

( 23.Qxb7 Rf8 24.Qxc7 Qf1+ 25.Kh4 Qf6+ 26.Kh3 Qf5+ 27.g4 Qf1+
28.Kg3 Qf4+ 29.Kg2 g5 {seems very unpleasant for white.} ) {%09DB}

23… Qf1+ {Qiyu Zhou grabs the initiative again.}

 

Position after 23... Qf1+

Position after 23… Qf1+

 

24.Kh4 Qf6+ {Qiyu Zhou wisely choses to force an exchange of queens and head into a rook vs. knight endgame.}

25.Qxf6 gxf6

26.Nd7 Kf7

27.Nc5 b6

28.Nd3 Re8

29.Nf4 {Hats off to Sindira Joshi for continueing to play on and give us a chance to study good endgame technique.}

 

Position after 29. Nf4

Position after 29. Nf4

 

29… c6

30.Kg4 Re3

31.Kf5 {Nothing can be done to save white’s queenside pawns from a Qiyu Zhou’s rampaging rook.}

31… Rxc3

32.Nh5 Rc2

33.h4 Rxa2

34.Kf4 a5

35.Ke3 b5

36.Nf4 a4

37.Nd3 a3

38.Nb4 Rb2 {Sindira Joshi resigns as there is no hope left for white.} 0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Puzzle Worthy Position 29

August 15, 2016

Black to move.

Correspondence Chess Opportunities

July 30, 2016

A lot has changed since the last time I did a post on correspondence chess. Now my level of play generates a constant stream of invitations to very prestigious events. I have accepted most of these invitations in order to further challenge myself and continue to grow in chess. Below is a list of my current correspondence chess events minus a couple of friendly matches.

 

The 2016 USCF Absolute Correspondence Chess Championship

The 2016 USCF Absolute Correspondence Chess Championship

 

The 2016 Germany Masters

The 2016 Germany Masters

 

The North Atlantic Team Tournament VII

The North Atlantic Team Tournament VII

 

13th North American Invitational Correspondence Chess Championship

13th North American Invitational Correspondence Chess Championship

 

“Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.” – Ann Landers

High Honors for the Torres Chess and Music Academy

May 19, 2016


FIDE, the official world chess organization, has only endorsed 48 academies world wide for their commitment to educational excellence in chess. The Torres Chess and Music Academy is honored to now be a part of this select group of chess schools. In addition to this international distinction, the Torres Chess and Music Academy has also been granted some notable privilidges including access to special FIDE training resources. I am confident that these privilidges will result in our organization becoming even better equipped to help California’s young chess players succeed at every level of competition.

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

www.ChessAndMusic.com 

 
 

Puzzle Worthy Position 18

May 4, 2016

Easy puzzle tonight from a fun victory. What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move?

Complete game:
[Event “SocialChess”]

[Site “Internet”]

[Date “2016.05.03”]

[Round “-“]

[White “Chris Torres”]

[Black “okun’ok (1574)”]

[Result “1-0”]
 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Nc3 O-O 5. d3 Nc6 6. Bg5 h6 7. h4 hxg5 8. hxg5 Nh7 9. Nd5 Nxg5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Qh5 f6 12. Nxf6# 1-0

Reader Submitted Question on Spielmann – Capablanca (1928)

May 1, 2016
Rudolf Spielmann

Rudolf Spielmann

Chris,

(Child’s name) and I were playing this game and couldn’t figure out why Spielmann won the game (Jose Raul Capablanca vs Rudolf Spielmann 1928) , since it’s not forced mate.

Thank you.

Best regards,
(Parent)

 

 

Answer:

 

Good question! Capablanca is one of my heroes but Spielmann is possibly the most overlooked chess genius in history. Unfortunate for Mr. Spielmann, he reached his peak in a very difficult time (the 1930’s) for chess players. In this period, sponsors for major events were hard to find and Europe was racing down the road toward WWII. Even still, Spielmann obtained a lifetime even record against the great Capablanca which modern chess players constantly marvel in envy at.

Now for the specifics of your question… The final position of Capablanca – Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928 looked like this:

 

Final position of Capablanca - Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928

Final position of Capablanca – Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928

 

The first thing we notice is that Rudolf Spielmann is threatening a mate in one with Qxg2#. To avoid mate, Capablanca could play (a)Qf3 or (b)pawn to f3. If Q f3:

After 40. Qf3.

After (a)40. Qf3.

Black responds with Qe1+ and Capablanca will aslo lose his queen.

White is in check and will lose his queen.

White is in check and will lose his queen.

 

So now for option (b):

Position after 40. f3.

Position after (b)40. f3.

This is a much better alternative to choice (a) but Capablanca would still lose. Immediately, I spot a nice fork that will win an additional pawn for black.

Position after 40... Qb1+.

Position after 40… Qb1+.

After 41. Kh2 Qxb5 42. Kg3 Qc4 black is ahead by a solid three points of material in an endgame and will eventually be able to convert his material advantage into a win.

Position after 42... Qc4.

Position after 42… Qc4.

Here, Capablanca would avoid trading queens and play something like:

43. Qd2 Qc5 44. Kh2 Be6 45. Kg3 g5 46. Kh2 Kg7 47. Qb2+ Kg6 48. Qd2 Qd5 49. Qc3 Qc4 50. Qe1
Qd4 51. Qb1+ Kg7 52. Kg3 Qe5+ 53. Kf2 Qc5+ 54. Kg3 Qxa5 and black should be able to use his extra force to win the endgame.

Position after 54... Qxa5.

Position after 54… Qxa5.

Capablanca respected Spielmann enough not to waste any extra energy on a forgone conclusion. Even still, I would be very disappointed if one of my students resigned as white where Capablanca did. Queen endgames are notoriously difficult to play properly and resigning in positions like these result in far fewer miraculous comebacks and more importantly the resigning player misses out entirely on important learning opportunities.

 

For those interested in learning more about this incredible chess battle, the entire game is pasted below. Enjoy…

[Event “Bad Kissingen”]
[Site “Bad Kissingen GER”]
[Date “1928.08.17”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[Black “Rudolf Spielmann”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[Result “0-1”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.e3 b5 6.a4 b4 7.Na2 e6 8.Bxc4 Be7 9.O-O
O-O 10.b3 c5 11.Bb2 Bb7 12.Nc1 Nc6 13.dxc5 Na5 14.Ne5 Nxc4 15.Nxc4 Bxc5 16.Nd3
Qd5 17.Nf4 Qg5 18.Bxf6 Qxf6 19.Rc1 Rfd8 20.Qh5 Rac8 21.Rfd1 g6 22.Rxd8+ Qxd8
23.Qe5 Be7 24.h3 Rc5 25.Qa1 Bf6 26.Rd1 Rd5 27.Rxd5 exd5 28.Ne5 Qd6 29.Nfd3 Ba6
30.Qe1 Bxe5 31.Nxe5 Qxe5 32.Qxb4 Bd3 33.Qc5 Qb8 34.b4 Qb7 35.b5 h5 36.Qc3 Bc4
37.e4 Qe7 38.exd5 Bxd5 39.a5 Qe4 0-1

 

If you have a question about chess, feel free to email me at chesslessons@aol.com

Latvia vs USA Chess Match 2015

April 1, 2016

  

 Team USA will be winning the Latvia – USA Correspondence Chess Match of 2015 and I helped lead the way as our highest board with a perfect result. My advice is simple, “Keep Calm and Take Your Time.”

LAT-USA 2015

TD Kracht, Jörg (IA)
Latvia White Black White Black USA
Board 1  SIM Roze, Andris  2513 ½ ½ ½ ½  SIM Holroyd, Kenneth  2510
Board 2  SIM Avotinš, Maigonis  2458 ½ ½ ½ ½  IM Morrow, Wolff  2454
Board 3  Klimakovs, Sergejs  2435 1 . . 0  SIM Knudsen, John C.  2435
Board 4  Klimakovs, Sergejs  2435 ½ ½ ½ ½  SIM Biedermann, Thomas  2433
Board 5  IM Auzinš, Maris  2402 1 ½ ½ 0  O’Connell, C.  2400
Board 6  IM Auzinš, Maris  2402 ½ 0 1 ½  Ingersol, Harry  2398
Board 7  IM Graudinš, Ilmars  2369 0E 0 1 1E  Torres, Chris  2352
Board 8  SIM Kažoks, Aivars  2345 ½ 0 1 ½  Brooks, Michael  2346
Board 9  SIM Kažoks, Aivars  2345 ½ 0 1 ½  Gleyzer, Leonid  2321
Board 10  Mihailovs, Arturs  2292 ½ ½ ½ ½  IM Schakel, Corky  2305
Board 11  Mihailovs, Arturs  2292 . . . .  Horwitz, Daniel M.  2297
Board 12  Bondars, Rolands  2280 ½ 0 1 ½  Landes, Eric  2283
Board 13  Bondars, Rolands  2280 ½ ½ ½ ½  Biedermann, Kyle  2271
Board 14  GM Gaujens, Artis  2225 ½ . . ½  White, David V.  2260
Board 15  GM Gaujens, Artis  2225 ½ ½ ½ ½  Fortune, Dr. Jonathan Ray  2233
Board 16  Korzans, Vilmars  2214 ½ 0E 1E ½  Palmateer, Carl  2227
Board 17  Korzans, Vilmars  2214 0E 0E 1E 1E  Cousins, Robert  2207
Board 18  Gerhards, Guntis  2212 ½ ½ ½ ½  Ledford, Steven O.  2185
Board 19  Gerhards, Guntis  2212 ½ ½ ½ ½  Jenkins, Richard  2180
Board 20  Kurpnieks, Vairis  2143 ½ ½ ½ ½  Leisner, Jon S.  2161
Board 21  Kurpnieks, Vairis  2143 . ½ ½ .  Beres, Juraj  2159
Board 22  Plume, Gunars  2091 ½ ½ ½ ½  Chipkin, Leonard B.  2117
Board 23  Plume, Gunars  2091 0 0 1 1  Relyea, Alexander  2108
Board 24  Mačs, Osvalds  2073 ½ ½ ½ ½  Weiss, Lester P.  2101
Board 25  Mačs, Osvalds  2073 1 ½ ½ 0  Cofer, David  2096
Board 26  Koops, Maris  2061 0 ½ ½ 1  Deskin, Gary  2067
Board 27  Koops, Maris  2061 ½ 0 1 ½  Ellis, James R.  2055
Board 28  Dzenis, Janis (Tukmus)  2048 ½ ½ ½ ½  Forney, Robert  2034
Board 29  Dzenis, Janis (Tukmus)  2048 1 ½ ½ 0  Underwood, Wesley K.  2031
Board 30  Boreisis, Vitauts  1991 0 ½ ½ 1  Tedesco, Matthew  2003
Board 31  Boreisis, Vitauts  1991 1 1 0 0  Haag, Russell A.  1982
Board 32  Beltins, Gunars  1953 0 0 1 1  Cross, Gregory W.  1976
Board 33  Beltins, Gunars  1953 0 ½ ½ 1  Sylvander, D.  1955
Board 34  Gulbis, Harijs  1897 1 ½ ½ 0  DiJoseph, John  1928
Board 35  Gulbis, Harijs  1897 0 0 1 1  Stroup, Jim  1907
Board 36  Gulbis, Harijs  1897
Bitmanis, Valdemars  1887
½ 1 0 ½  Cakars, John  1906
Board 37  Bitmanis, Valdemars  1887
Gulbis, Harijs  1897
0 0 1 1  Carter, Maurice H.  1901
Board 38  Ulmanis, Ainis  1799 0 0 1 1  Neale, Mark  1820
Board 39  Plums, Uldis  1682 0 0 1 1  Howard, James  1682
Board 40  Plums, Uldis  1682 ½ 1 0 ½  McLaughlin, Ed  1681
Total: 29.5 45.5

 

 

[Event “LAT-USA 2015”]

[Site “ICCF”]

[Date “2015.02.13”]

[Round “?.7”]

[White “Torres, Chris”]

[Black “Graudins, Ilmars”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2352”]

[BlackElo “2369”]

[PlyCount “61”]

[EventDate “2015.??.??”]

[WhiteTeam “USA”]

[BlackTeam “Latvia”]

[WhiteTeamCountry “USA”]

[BlackTeamCountry “LAT”]

 

  1. a3 g6 2. f4 Bg7 3. e4 d5 4. e5 f6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. d4 Nh6 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. h3 Nf5
  2. hxg4 Ne3 10. Qe2 Nxc2+ 11. Kd1 Nxa1 12. g3 Qe8 13. b3 Qc6 14. Qd3 Nd7 15.

Qb1 Nxb3 16. Qxb3 a6 17. Bd3 fxe5 18. fxe5 Rfc8 19. Be4 Nb6 20. Ng5 h6 21. Ngf3

g5 22. Nxg5 hxg5 23. Bh7+ Kf8 24. Qe3 Nd7 25. Qxg5 Nf6 26. Rf1 Qa4+ 27. Bc2

Qxd4 28. Qh5 Qe3 29. exf6 exf6 30. g5 Qe5 31. Rf5 1-0

 

 

[Event “LAT-USA 2015”]

[Site “ICCF”]

[Date “2015.02.13”]

[Round “?.7”]

[White “Graudins, Ilmars”]

[Black “Torres, Chris”]

[Result “0-1”]

[WhiteElo “2369”]

[BlackElo “2352”]

[PlyCount “68”]

[EventDate “2015.??.??”]

[WhiteTeam “Latvia”]

[BlackTeam “USA”]

[WhiteTeamCountry “LAT”]

[BlackTeamCountry “USA”]

 

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. c4

c6 9. Qc2 Na6 10. a3 Bg4 11. Ne5 Bxe5 12. dxe5 Nac5 13. f3 Nxd3 14. Qxd3 Nc5

  1. Qd4 Nb3 16. Qxg4 Nxa1 17. Bh6 g6 18. Nc3 Qb6+ 19. Kh1 Qxb2 20. Qf4 f5 21.

Na4 Qe2 22. Rxa1 Rfe8 23. cxd5 cxd5 24. Qb4 Qxe5 25. Rg1 b6 26. Bf4 Qe7 27. Qd2

d4 28. Qxd4 Rac8 29. h3 b5 30. Nc3 Qc5 31. Qd5+ Kh8 32. Qxc5 Rxc5 33. Na2 a5

  1. Rd1 Rc4 {time forfeit} 0-1

 

Final Reminder to Register Your Child for the SPFNO Chess Championship

February 22, 2016

Dear Fellow Chess Parents,

 

Do children who play competitive chess develop skills that will give them advantages over their non-chess peers? 

 

Yes, I certainly believe so!

 

My name is Chris Torres and I am the Organizer for the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys. If you sign your child up right now, I can promise your family a very special kind of tournament experience perhaps unlike any other you have ever attended.

 

First of all, by signing your child up for the 2016 SPFNO, you are guaranteeing your child the opportunity to meet and hang out with the former World Champion Grandmaster Susan Polgar.

SPNO 2015 u16u18boys

But that’s only the beginning of the fun they’ll have when they start playing chess with us!

 

  • The first place winner in each championship section:

*Qualifies for the Prominent Susan Polgar National Invitational for Girls (Girls sections only).

*Qualifies for the 2016 FIDE World Youth Chess Championship.*

*Wins $100,000 in prizes and scholarships to Webster University (U16/18 sections).

SPNO 2015 team

 

  • The SPFNO will take place at a 34,200 square foot facility which we will not be sharing with any other activities. This means our players can be conformably spread out and parents have plenty of space to mingle while waiting for their kids to finish games.

 

  • At the SPFNO your family will be treated to free parking and offered a fine selection of affordable food cooked in a real restraint on site.

 

  • The SPFNO has its own state-of-the-art website which will keep you up to date on tournament results and pairings without requiring your participation in a stampede to view the wall charts.

 

 

The Fun of Watching Your Child Learn and Grow through Chess

 

Part of the fun of the SPFNO is watching your child meet and make friends with other youngsters who love chess as much as they do. As a competitor in the SPFNO your child will get to participate in a chess tournament attended by many of the best chess players their age in the U.S.A.

SPFNO 2015 u8boys

Another part – and an important one – is having your child get his/her games analyzed by brilliant players such as Grandmaster Daniel Naroditsky who will be analyzing games for free at the SPFNO.

analysis

At the SPFNO your child will be placed in an environment where chess is considered cool and where being a high achiever is the norm. Basically, we are providing the ideal conditions for your child to learn and grow through chess.

 

The Excitement of Shaping the Future through Chess

 

For some families, the excitement of joining the SPFNO is reason enough to attend. For other families, it will be because of the enormous learning opportunity the SPFNO creates. For me, it is knowing that we, as parents, are doing something to make the world a better place. I honestly believe that many of our future “thought leaders” will be present at tournaments like the SPFNO.

 

Also, The SPFNO is an official qualifying event for the FIDE World Youth Chess Championships. What could be more exciting than earning the chance to compete against the best chess players in the world?!

 

By signing our own kids up for such events, I believe we are shaping the future through chess. Now that’s real exciting!

 

Come Play Chess with Us

 

So join the Torres Chess and Music Academy and the Susan Polgar Foundation for the fun of it, the learning opportunities and the excitement of shaping the future. The price goes up on Wednesday so join today!

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

Chess Dad


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