Archive for the ‘Jerome Gambit’ Category

Useful Junk: The Jerome Gambit

January 2, 2013

Below is another interesting game where I played the Jerome Gambit against my student, Iddo Zohar. The Jerome Gambit is an unsound specialty of mine which I like to categorize as “useful junk.” Iddo Zohar is a very talented junior chess player who you will definitely here more about in future posts.

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Bxf7+ {This is the Jerome Gambit.}

 

The Jerome Gambit

The Jerome Gambit

4…Kxf7

5. Nxe5+ Nxe5 {White is two pieces down but can get one back for sure.} 6.

Qh5+ Ng6 7. Qd5+ {Its better to delay the capture of the bishop for one

move.} Kf8 8. Qxc5+ d6 9. Qe3 Nf6 10. Nc3 Kf7 {Black wants to get his rook

on e8.} 11. d4 Re8 12. O-O {White is down material but controls the center

and has better king safety.} d5 13. f3 {This maintains a pawn grip on the

center and hurts the influence of the knight on f6.} c6 14. e5 Nd7

 

Position after 14...Nd7.

Position after 14…Nd7.

15. Ne4!? {15. f4 would have given white plenty of compensation for his

material disadvantage.} dxe4 16. Qb3+ Kf8 17. fxe4+ Nf6 {This was black’s

best move but it allows white to regain a piece when he chooses.} 18. Be3

Be6 19. Qxb7 Rb8 20. Qxc6 Rxb2 {I definately prefer white here. However,

the position is roughly even.} 21. exf6 gxf6? {Black needed to play Qc8.}

22. d5! {White’s superior pawn center provides the winning advantage.}

22. d5!

22. d5!

22…Bd7 23. Rxf6+ {It’s all about tactics now.} Kg7 24. Rxg6+! hxg6 25. Qc3+ Kh7

26. Qxb2 Rxe4 27. Bf2 Bf5 28. Qb3 Qh8 29. Rd1 Rg4 30. Qh3+ {White has a

winning endgame so it is time to end black’s attack and trade.} Kg8 31.

Qxh8+ Kxh8 32. d6 Rb4 33. Bxa7 Rb2? 34. Bd4+ {After this fork, black

resigns.} 1-0

To learn more on the Jerome Gambit you should visit my friend’s Jerome Gambit blog.

Another Lesson in the Jerome Gambit

June 9, 2010

I received so much positive feedback after I presented “The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!” that I decided to provide my readers with another Jerome Gambit lesson.  If you are intrigued by the Jerome Gambit I suggest you visit Rick Kennedy’s web page on the gambit here: http://jeromegambit.blogspot.com/ 

Have fun and study at your own risk!

[Event “lesson”]
[Site “Cupertino”]
[Date “2009.05.05”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Torres, Chris”]
[Black “Zhang, Lunxi”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Jerome Gambit”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Bxf7+ {The questionable and dangerous
Jerome Gambit.} Kxf7 5. Nxe5+ Nxe5 6. Qh5+ Kf8 {This move and Ke6 are both
known to be strong replies and leave black in a technically better but very
dangerous situation.} 7. Qxe5 d6 8. Qg3 {I avoid playing Qf4 as black can
reply Qf6 and suggest a trade of queens or gain a strong attack if I try
9.Qg3 h5!} Nf6 9. O-O Nxe4 10. Qf4+ Nf6 11. b4 {From this position I have
always won.} Bb6 12. Bb2 Bd7 13. Nc3 Bc6? {This move looks strong at first
but black forgot about white’s “b” pawn.} 14. b5! {Black is forced to
retreat and loose time.} Bd7 15. Ne4 Kf7 16. Rae1 {The gambiteer must keep
developing with purpose.} Bxb5? {A tempting mistake. Rf8 would have been
much better.} 17. Bxf6! {The rook on f1 is of no concern as it is my only
piece not involved in attacking black’s king.} gxf6 18. Ng5+ {This is how a
professional uses tactics.} Kg6? {Kg8 would be better.} 19. Ne6 Qd7??
{Black needs to play Qg8 and defend perfectly.} 20. Qg3+ Kh6 21. Qh3+? {I
missed an easy mate in 6 starting with Re4.} Kg6 22. Qg4+ Kh6 23. Qf5 Qf7
24. Re4! {I finally spot the winner.} Bd7 25. Rh4+ Qh5 26. Rxh5# 1-0

The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!

May 8, 2009

This fantastic game from 1880 is perhaps the most violent chess game ever played.

[Event "Jerome Gambit"]
[Site "England"]
[Date "1880.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "Joseph Henry Blackburne"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "28"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.Bxf7+
Kxf7 5.Nxe5+ Nxe5 6.Qh5+
{Note - d4 also regains a piece and deserves attention}
 g6 7.Qxe5 d6 8.Qxh8
Qh4 9.O-O Nf6 10.c3{Note - This is too slow as it does not stop Ng4.
 White should have tried Qd8
pinning the knight on f6.} Ng4 11.h3 Bxf2+ 12.Kh1 Bf5 13.Qxa8 Qxh3+
14.gxh3 Bxe4# 0-1

notes by Chris Torres

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