Archive for the ‘National Elementary Chess Championship’ Category

Kevin Pan is Brilliant at 2018 USCF Elementary Championships

May 19, 2018

Round 7: Drew Justice vs. Kevin Pan

It is always my great pleasure to share the stories and achievements of California’s most outstanding young chess talents. Below is a remarkably brilliant game played by Mission San Jose Elementary School’s own Kevin Pan in route to a National Championship title both for Kevin and the MSJE Chess Team.

[Event “USCF National Elementary Championships”]
[Site “Nashville, TN”]
[Date “2018.5.13”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Pan, Kevin”]
[Black “Justice, Drew”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “B18”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ CARO-KANN,B18]}

1.e4 c6

2.d4 d5

3.Nc3 dxe4

4.Nxe4 Bf5

5.Ng3 Bg6

6.N1e2 {Kevin avoids the old stodgy 6. h4 line in favor of creating early complications for Drew. Mikhail Tal would be pleased…}

Pan-Justice1

Position after 6. N1e2

6… e6

7.Nf4 Bd6

8.Ngh5 {“Genius is initiative on fire!”-Holbrook Jackson}

( 8.c3 Qh4 9.Ngh5 Bxh5 10.Qxh5 Qxh5 11.Nxh5 g6 12.Bf4 Bxf4 13.Nxf4
Nf6 14.Nd3 Nbd7 15.g3 O-O 16.Bg2 Rfc8 17.a4 a5 18.Kd2 Kf8 19.Rhb1
Nb6 20.Nc5 Rc7 21.b4 Nfd5 22.bxa5 Nc4+ 23.Kd3 Nxa5 24.c4 Ne7
25.Bh3 Kg8 {1/2-1/2, Polgar Judit (HUN) 2665 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2795 , Haifa 1998 It (active)})

Pan-Justice2

Position after 8. Ngh5

8… Bxf4 {8…Bxh5 and Kf8 seem less tricky from black’s persepective.}

( 8…Bxh5 9.Nxh5 g6 10.Ng3 Nf6 11.Bc4 Nbd7 12.c3 Bf8 13.O-O
Bg7 14.Re1 O-O 15.Bg5 h6 16.Bf4 Nd5 17.Bd6 Re8 18.Bb3 Bf8 19.Ne4
N5f6 20.Bxf8 Rxf8 21.Qf3 Nxe4 22.Rxe4 Nf6 23.Re5 Kg7 24.Rae1
Nd5 25.g3 Qf6 26.Qg4 Rh8 27.h4 h5 28.Qe4 {…0-1, Guido Flavio (ITA) 2405 – Zelcic Robert (CRO) 2554 , Schwarzach 8/25/2012 It (open)})

( 8…Kf8 9.c3 Nd7 10.Qf3 Ngf6 11.Nxf6 Qxf6 12.Be2 Bc2 13.Qg4
Bf5 14.Qf3 Re8 15.Nh5 Qg6 16.Ng3 Bc2 17.Qg4 Qxg4 18.Bxg4 Nf6
19.Bd1 Bxd1 20.Kxd1 h5 21.f3 h4 22.Ne2 e5 23.h3 exd4 24.Nxd4
c5 25.Nf5 Bc7 26.Re1 Rd8+ 27.Kc2 Nh5 28.Ne3 {…0-1, Vydeslaver Alik (ISR) 2404 – Shengelia Davit (AUT) 2569 , Barcelona 8/29/2007 It (open)})

9.Nxf4 Ne7

( 9…Nf6 10.Nxg6 hxg6 11.Be2 Nbd7 12.c3 Qc7 13.g3
c5 14.O-O Rd8 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.Qc2 O-O 17.Be3 Nd5 18.Bd4 e5 19.Bxc5
Qxc5 20.Bf3 f5 21.Bxd5+ Rxd5 22.Qb3 Rfd8 23.Qxb7 e4 24.b4 Qc4
25.Qxa7 f4 26.gxf4 Rd3 27.Qc5 Qe6 28.Qg5 R8d5 29.Qg2 {…1-0, Finkel Alexander (ISR) 2455 – Adianto Utut (INA) 2610 , Bastia 1998 It (open) (active)})

10.h4 {Kevin will not stop applying pressure.}

( 10.c3 Qc7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.g3 c5 13.Bb5+ Nbc6 14.dxc5 Qe5+ 15.Be3 Nf5 16.Qf3
Nxe3 17.Bxc6+ Ke7 18.Bxb7 Nc4+ 19.Qe4 Rab8 20.Qxe5 Nxe5 21.c6
Nd3+ 22.Ke2 Nxb2 23.Rab1 Na4 24.c7 {1-0, Karpatchev Aleksandr (RUS) 2469 – Berg Peter (DEN) 2017 , Esbjerg 7/13/2007 Cup North Sea (open)})

10… h6

11.Nxg6 {And these two extremely talented combatants are discovering new territory in an old opening.}

11… Nxg6

12.h5 {In these kinds of positions you might as well push the pawn forward one more square to force the black knight to retreat.}

Pan-Justice3

Position after 12. h5

12… Ne7

13.Qg4 {Which in turn allows the queen to develop with threats.}

13… Nf5 {Black’s knight must provide protection to g7.}

14.Bd3 {Unfortunately for Drew Justice, the knight on f5 is also an easy target.}

14… Qxd4 {?} {Kevin Pan’s constant pressure finally causes Drew Justice to crack. 14…Nd7 and 14…0-0 are much better choices for black.}
( 14…Nd7 15.Bxf5 Qa5+ 16.c3 Qxf5 17.Qxg7 O-O-O )
( 14…O-O 15.c3 Nd7 )

Pan-Justice4

Position after 14… Qxd4?

15.Bxf5 {!} {Kevin spots the tactical punishment for Drew’s inaccuracy.}

15… Qe5+

16.Be4 f5

17.Qg6+ {Scissors beat paper and checks beat fork.}

17… Ke7

18.Be3 Nd7

19.O-O-O fxe4 {?}

( 19…Rag8 )

Pan-Justice5

Position after 19… fxe4?

20.Rxd7+{!} {It’s moves like these that win national championships!}

20… Kxd7

21.Qf7+ Kc8

22.Bf4 {Black resigns and Kevin Pan is a National Champion!}
1-0

Pan-Justice6

Position after 22. Bf4

 

 

Game pgn:

[Event “USCF National Elementary Championships”]
[Site “Nashville, TN”]
[Date “2018.5.13”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Pan, Kevin”]
[Black “Justice, Drew”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “B18”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ CARO-KANN,B18]} 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5 5.Ng3
Bg6 6.N1e2 {Kevin avoids the old stodgy 6. h4 line in favor of creating early complications for Drew. Mikhail Tal would be pleased…} {%08DA}
e6 7.Nf4 Bd6 8.Ngh5 {“Genius is initiative on fire!”-Holbrook Jackson}
( 8.c3 Qh4 9.Ngh5 Bxh5 10.Qxh5 Qxh5 11.Nxh5 g6 12.Bf4 Bxf4 13.Nxf4
Nf6 14.Nd3 Nbd7 15.g3 O-O 16.Bg2 Rfc8 17.a4 a5 18.Kd2 Kf8 19.Rhb1
Nb6 20.Nc5 Rc7 21.b4 Nfd5 22.bxa5 Nc4+ 23.Kd3 Nxa5 24.c4 Ne7
25.Bh3 Kg8 {1/2-1/2, Polgar Judit (HUN) 2665 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2795 , Haifa 1998 It (active)}
) {%09DB} Bxf4 {8…Bxh5 and Kf8 seem less tricky from black’s persepective.} {%09DB}
( 8…Bxh5 9.Nxh5 g6 10.Ng3 Nf6 11.Bc4 Nbd7 12.c3 Bf8 13.O-O
Bg7 14.Re1 O-O 15.Bg5 h6 16.Bf4 Nd5 17.Bd6 Re8 18.Bb3 Bf8 19.Ne4
N5f6 20.Bxf8 Rxf8 21.Qf3 Nxe4 22.Rxe4 Nf6 23.Re5 Kg7 24.Rae1
Nd5 25.g3 Qf6 26.Qg4 Rh8 27.h4 h5 28.Qe4 {…0-1, Guido Flavio (ITA) 2405 – Zelcic Robert (CRO) 2554 , Schwarzach 8/25/2012 It (open)}
) ( 8…Kf8 9.c3 Nd7 10.Qf3 Ngf6 11.Nxf6 Qxf6 12.Be2 Bc2 13.Qg4
Bf5 14.Qf3 Re8 15.Nh5 Qg6 16.Ng3 Bc2 17.Qg4 Qxg4 18.Bxg4 Nf6
19.Bd1 Bxd1 20.Kxd1 h5 21.f3 h4 22.Ne2 e5 23.h3 exd4 24.Nxd4
c5 25.Nf5 Bc7 26.Re1 Rd8+ 27.Kc2 Nh5 28.Ne3 {…0-1, Vydeslaver Alik (ISR) 2404 – Shengelia Davit (AUT) 2569 , Barcelona 8/29/2007 It (open)}
) 9.Nxf4 Ne7 ( 9…Nf6 10.Nxg6 hxg6 11.Be2 Nbd7 12.c3 Qc7 13.g3
c5 14.O-O Rd8 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.Qc2 O-O 17.Be3 Nd5 18.Bd4 e5 19.Bxc5
Qxc5 20.Bf3 f5 21.Bxd5+ Rxd5 22.Qb3 Rfd8 23.Qxb7 e4 24.b4 Qc4
25.Qxa7 f4 26.gxf4 Rd3 27.Qc5 Qe6 28.Qg5 R8d5 29.Qg2 {…1-0, Finkel Alexander (ISR) 2455 – Adianto Utut (INA) 2610 , Bastia 1998 It (open) (active)}
) 10.h4 {Kevin will not stop applying pressure.} ( 10.c3 Qc7
11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.g3 c5 13.Bb5+ Nbc6 14.dxc5 Qe5+ 15.Be3 Nf5 16.Qf3
Nxe3 17.Bxc6+ Ke7 18.Bxb7 Nc4+ 19.Qe4 Rab8 20.Qxe5 Nxe5 21.c6
Nd3+ 22.Ke2 Nxb2 23.Rab1 Na4 24.c7 {1-0, Karpatchev Aleksandr (RUS) 2469 – Berg Peter (DEN) 2017 , Esbjerg 7/13/2007 Cup North Sea (open)}
) h6 11.Nxg6 {And these two exteremely talented combatants are discovering new territory in an old opening.}
Nxg6 12.h5 {In these kinds of positions you might as well push the pawn forward one more square to force the black knight to retreat.} {%08DA}
Ne7 13.Qg4 {Which in turn allows the queen to develop with threats.}
Nf5 {Black’s knight must provide prtotection to g7.} 14.Bd3 {Unfortunately for Drew Justice, the knight on f5 is also an easy target.}
Qxd4 {?} {Kevin Pan’s constant pressure finally causes Drew Justice to crack. 14…Nd7 and 14…0-0 are much better choices for black.}
( 14…Nd7 15.Bxf5 Qa5+ 16.c3 Qxf5 17.Qxg7 O-O-O )
( 14…O-O 15.c3 Nd7 ) {%09DB} 15.Bxf5 {!} {Kevin spots the tactical punishment for Drew’s inaccuracy.} {%09DB}
Qe5+ 16.Be4 f5 17.Qg6+ {Scissors beat paper and checks beat fork.}
Ke7 18.Be3 Nd7 19.O-O-O fxe4 {?} ( 19…Rag8 ) {%09DB} 20.Rxd7+
{!} {It’s moves like these that win national championships!} {%09DB}
Kxd7 21.Qf7+ Kc8 22.Bf4 {Black resigns and Kevin Pan is a National Champion!}
1-0

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MSJE Chess Team Again Wins Big at Nationals!

May 17, 2018

Coach Joe’s Report on the 2018 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships (Photos by Hui Wang):

On the weekend of May 11th to 13th more than 2200 Elementary school students competed in the National Elementary School Chess Championships in Nashville, TN. This was the tenth straight year that a strong group of Mission San Jose Elementary School (MSJE) chess players traveled from Fremont, California to attend these championships and once again they brought back an impressive collection of plaques and trophies.

The overall elementary school championship is the K-6 Championship section. MSJE has won this section three times in the last five years (2013, 2015, & 2016) and four times in the past nine years (also 2009). We decided to arrange our players to maximize the chances of winning this section again. This meant moving our two top fifth graders (Aghilan Nachiappan and Allyson Wong) into K-6.  This move left us without a full team in K-5, but our two second grade stars (Kavya Meiyappan and Jason Liu) agreed to move up and play in K-5 since we did not have a full team in K-3.  (Four players is a full team.  The team score is the sum of the scores of the top four players on the team.

This left us with a K-6 team with one super star and five very strong players and a K-5 team that had a reasonable shot at a top 10 finish.

We have had a great K-1 team and I fully expected them to finish in first. I was confident enough to mention this to Chuck Graves, the MSJE principal.  MSJE won K-1 in 2012 and this team was certainly stronger than our 2012 team.

As high as my expectations were for our K-1 team the team actually exceeded expectations.  They got off to a fast start and were never in any place but first.  There were 154 players in the K-1 section.  Only six players scored six or more points.  Our top three players Artham Pawar, Lucas Jiang, and Arnam Pawar all scored 6 out of seven.  Adirya Arutla scored 5/7, Sagwartha Selvan scored 3.5/7.  Sarvesh Maniv also competed for our K-1 team.  This team won by 4.5 points which is a gigantic margin. They could have not shown up for the seventh round and still won first place.

Our K-6 team was locked in a brutal battle with three powerhouse schools form New York all weekend. They went into the last round a half point behind Speyer and a half point ahead of Dalton. These are both perennial scholastic chess powerhouses.  Kevin Pan, our top player, with 5/6 was in a battle of the individual championship.  We gained a half point on Speyer, Dalton gained a half point on us and we ended up in a three-way tie for first place.  Kevin won his game and ended up in a tie for first place.

Our K-5 team of Kavya Meiyappan, (4/7) Ayan Kassamali, (3.5/7) Jason Liu (3/7) and Jolene Liu (2.5/7) tied for seventh place.  Zahaan Kassamali also competed in K-3 (4.5/7).

Congratulations to the chess team for a great result at the National Championships.

MSJE Chess Coaches: Joe Lonsdale, Meiyaps Sathappan, Terry and Cathy Liu, Hui Wang, Nachi Nachiappan, Chris Torres

MSJE Chess Team Wins Two National Chess Championships in One Month(by Coach Joe)

June 11, 2015

Team MSJE after winning the Yes2Chess National Championship!

Team MSJE after winning the Yes2Chess National Championship!

There were two elementary school chess team championships held in the United States in May 2015. The weekend of May 9th and 10th the USCF (United States Chess Federation) held its annual Elementary school chess championship at the Grand Old Opry Hotel in Nashville TN.   This is the “official” chess championship and for the second time in three years (also 2013) and the third time seven years (also 2009) MSJE (Mission San Jose Elementary of Fremont, CA) won the National Elementary School Chess Championship. In the USCF Championship schools enter as many players as they want in the championship section of the Nashville tournament. Over 2300 students and 600 teams competed in the tournament in Nashville.

There was also a Yes2Chess national elementary school chess championship held in May. Yes2Chess is a not for profit organization based in the UK that is dedicated to increasing the use of chess in schools. The Yes2Chess Championship consists of five player teams usually playing over the internet. It is not as prestigious as the USCF championship, but instead of playing for a trophy the players are playing for an all-expenses paid trip to London to be the US representative and compete with teams from seven other countries for the international championship. ( http://en.chessbase.com/post/barclaycard-yes2chess-tournament-2015 )

The Yes2chess nationals were designed to come down to four teams the plan was to have an online playoff on the day after Memorial Day. The four teams were Nest A with an average rating of 1537, Nest B, 1655, and IS 318 with an average rating of 1758. Both Nest teams and IS 318 were from New York City. The fourth team was MSJE with an average rating of 1771. (Note Kavya played  on our B team and was not eligible to play in these finals.) Nest and IS 318 have both won USCF National titles.   They are part of the very strong New York City scholastic chess program.  The New York teams played at the famous Marshall Chess club in Manhattan. We played in Don Pans’ (David’s dad) home.

In the first round we were paired against IS 318. We expected, based on ratings, that they would be our main competition. We got off to a bad start and lost on board four and five. Boards 1-3 looked even with maybe an advantage on board 2. Board three then draws based on a repetition of position. We now need to win boards one and two or lose our first match. It is almost impossible to win a four team round robin if one losses the first round.

This is a unique feature of team match chess. On board one David Pan had four pawns and a knight vs. four pawns and a bishop. This would have almost certainly been a draw except for the pressure put on David by the fact that the team had to have a win.   David got his king to the center and won several pawns and the game. Rishith pushed home his advantage and we get the last two points for a 2 ½ to 2 ½ draw.

Meanwhile Nest B beats Nest A 4-1.   We are paired with Nest A in round two.   We expect that MSJE and IS 318 will win our last two matches and it will come down to tie-breaks, which is the total points scored. We get off to a good start against Nest A. Leo wins quickly on board 5. Rishith and Kevin win on boards two and three. That assures that we win the match. Annapoorni losses a tough game on board 4, and David draws on board one.   This gives us a 3 ½ to 1 ½ victory, but it is somewhat discouraging as Nest B beat Nest A 4-1. I was concerned that if IS 318 could beat Nest A 5-0 they would beat us on tie breaks.

The result of the round two Nest B versus IS 318 match is a 4-1 win by Nest B! This is a shocker. We thought IS 318 was our major competition, but now Nest B has two wins and we have a win and a draw. Also they have scored 8 points against the two teams that we scored six points.

It all comes down to the last match Nest B versus MSJE. If Nest B wins or draws the match, they go to London. If we beat Nest B we go to London.

Round three gets off to a good start.   We are looking very good on board one, where David Pan has a strong position. Also both Annapoorni on board 4 and Leo on board 5 are ahead material and seem certain to win. Rishith seems to be in a tough fight in board two. David wins giving us the first points. Leo is moving his rook to take a knight and announce checkmate on board five when the rook stops short of the knight and his opponent gets a simple checkmate. Leo is devastated the position was very simple and the only move was checkmate. The rules on mouse errors are very clear. The move and the loss stand.

Shortly after this happens Annapoorni wins on board four. Then on board two the opponent of Rishith has a mouse error and goes from a very strong position to a lost position. Rishith pushes home the win and we have a victory and a trip to London. Kevin is way ahead on board two. We try to keep the celebrating to a minimum until Kevin checkmates his opponent. Kevin wins and we win the last match 4-1.

The MSJE Chess team is going to London!

 

Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

Your child can come and train with the MSJE Chess Team this summer at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp. Sign up Today!

 

Memorial Weekend Sales Event for the Fremont Summer Chess Camp

May 18, 2015
Fremont Summer Chess Camp

Fremont Summer Chess Camp

Summer is rapidly approaching and that means it’s almost time for the annual Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont, California. Our summer chess camp features coaches with decades of chess teaching experience who annually create a summer camp that is fun, competitive and educational.  All camp attendees will receive the best chess training available and take part in USCF rated tournament with awards given at the end of each week. So why not kick your summer off by saving 10% off of tuition and receiving one of several “thank you” gifts just for signing your child up for the chess camp hosted by the school that just won the 2015 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships?

memorial_day_sale

The TCAMA’s Memorial Weekend Sales Event is the best time to register your child for the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

  • Sign up for one week by May 25th and your child will receive a free private lesson with a TCAMA chess coach prior to the start of the chess camp.
  • Sign up for two weeks of camp and you will also get a copy of Chess Tactics for Champions by our friend Grandmaster Susan Polgar at your child’s free private lesson.
  • Finally, if you sign your child up for three or more weeks of the Fremont Summer Chess Camp, he/she will receive the free lesson, book and a deluxe triple weighted set of tournament chess pieces!

week3six

Of course, it’s really about giving your child the best chess education possible this summer. That is why the TCAMA only uses the best and most proven local chess coaches at our Fremont Summer Chess Camp. This summer, we proudly are offering classes with:

*IM Emory Tate – Weibel Coach

*NM Eric Schiller PhD. – famous chess author

*Francisco Anchondo – Weibel Coach

*Joe LonsdaleHead Coach of the National Champions at MSJE!

*James Paquette – Director of Instruction for the TCAMA

*Tans Hylkema – TCAMA’s early childhood specialist

*Chris Torres – President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

Even better, because all of these chess coaches work full time in the Bay Area, your child can continue to seek guidance from our highly accomplished staff at all of the big scholastic tournaments held in Northern California.

week4one

Join us at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp located at Mission San Jose Elementary School  in Fremont from June 29th through July 23rd. Remember to sign up by May 25th in order to receive a 10% discount and claim a special “thank you gift” for your child. For more details and to register online, please visit www.ChessAndMusic.com and I’ll see you at chess camp.

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

Coach for the 2015 National Elementary Chess Champions at Mission San Jose Elementary School

 

P.S. Don’t forget to be sociable and share this incredible offer with your friends.

Fremont’s MSJE Wins its Third National Elementary Chess Championship!

May 11, 2015
MSJE is the 2015 USCF National Elementary Chess Champion

MSJE is the 2015 USCF National Elementary Chess Champion

Mission San Jose Elementary School hasn’t just won a third National USCF K-6 Championship in just seven years. They’ve become a scholastic chess dynasty! And if ever a dynasty needs an icon, Head Coach Joe Lonsdale can fill that role quite capably for the MSJE Chess Team.

 

Head Coach Joe Lonsdale with his beautiful wife Donna DePietro Woods.

Head Coach Joe Lonsdale with his beautiful wife Donna DePietro Woods.

Perhaps you haven’t heard of Joe Lonsdale yet but he is worthy of being compared with such great coaches as Mike Krzyzewski, Gregg Popovich, or Phil Jackson.  Coach Joe, who originally established the MSJE Chess Team for his sons back in 1990, has done much more than teach chess. He has created a model for running a successful scholastic chess program that is constantly being copied but never quite duplicated. Coach Joe’s approach to teaching chess isn’t rocket science. His coaching staff takes the time to thoroughly analyze every child’s game every Monday night as well as at all major chess events. Many coaches do something similar but lack the consistency and commitment to keep it up all year let alone for twenty-five years.

 

Every great coach needs more than his/her own skill and dedication to win national championships. It is, of course, the players who actually win the titles through competition. And MSJE had quite the talented bunch of kids playing in the Elementary Championship Section.

 

Team mates Kavya Sasikumar and Annapoorni Meiyappan.

Teammates Kavya Sasikumar and Annapoorni Meiyappan.

The battle at the chess boards for these kids was difficult and in the end they received top honors by the slimmest of margins over I.S. 318 from New York. Sixth grader David Pan lead the charge by finishing tied for fifth place overall with an impressive 5.5/7. Super talented fourth grader Annapoorni Meiyappan finished only a half point behind David with 5/7. Next was the fourth grader Rishith Susarla with 4.5 and fifth grader Kavya Sasikumar with 4.

 

For now, it is once again time to celebrate a National Championship in Fremont, California. The victors can revel in their success. Soon after the party finishes, the kids will be coming to the Fremont Summer Chess Camp at, where else except for their own school’s gymnasium to hone their chess skills. Since only one of MSJE’s top scorers is graduating this year, you can bet they will be a strong favorite to repeat next year.

 

MSJE Coaches Joe Lonsdale and Chris Torres will be teaching at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp in Northern California. For more information on the Torres Chess and Music Academy and to register your child for the summer camp, please visit: http://www.chessandmusic.com 

Coach Joe’s Report on the 2014 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships

May 19, 2014

MSJE Head Coach, Joe Lonsdale, Provides a Brief Summary of  Fremont’s Achievements At the 2014 National Elementary Chess Championships.

The MSJE Chess Team wins another National Championship!

The MSJE Chess Team wins another National Championship!

The 2014 National Elementary School Chess Championships were held the weekend of May 9th to 11th in Dallas, TX.  More than 2,200 students from 107 schools competed in these championships. 17 MSJE (Mission San Jose Elementary School, Fremont, CA) students attended these championships.  MSJE won first place in the K-3 Championship section.  The MSJE Chess team is the 2014 National Primary School Chess Champion.  MSJE tied for fifth place in the K-1 section and tied for fourth place in the K-5 section.

Gomes Elementary School, also of Fremont won the Elementary school (K -6) division.  This is the second time in two years that two of the major elementary school sections were won by schools from Fremont, CA.  Last year Gomes won K-5 and MSJE won K-6.  In K-6 Joanna Liu and Jason Zhang each had five wins and a draw in seven games and tied for six place.  Ganesh Murugappan scored 5 points and William Sartorio scored 4.5 points.  The Gomes Elementary team is now the National Elementary School Chess Champions.

Coach Joe Lonsdale stands with the MSJE k-1 Chess Team.

Coach Joe Lonsdale stands with the MSJE k-1 Chess Team.

In the K-1 section Arnav Lingannagari was the top scorer for the MSJE team with five wins and a draw in seven games (5.5 points).  Arnav tied for 12th place and won a large trophy.  Allyson Wong scored five points, tied for 22nd place and won a large trophy.  Shreyas Jay scored four points and Siddharth Arutla scored 3.5 points.  Ayaan Kassamali and Jolene Liu also competed for our K-1 team.  Shreyas, Siddharth, Ayaan, and Jolene all won trophies.

The Final Standings in the K-3 Section at the 2014 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships.

The Final Standings in the K-3 Section at the 2014 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships.

In the K-3 Section MSJE was the top rated team, but several teams from New York City were close behind.  Rishith Susarla was our top rated player at 1701 and came in with the top score of 5.5 points tying for 7th place and winning a large trophy.  Second grader Kevin Pan (1534) and Annapoorni Meiyappan (1508) each scored 5 points tied for 17th place and won large trophies.  Second grader Stephen He (rated only 925) was paired against a 1337 third grader from a top New York team in the last round.  Stephen won his game to give MSJE a perfect four point round and a clear first place.   We usually do well in the last round and our motto is “MSJE owns the seventh round!”  Atul Thirumalai, Shree Jay, and Amulya Harish each scored 3.5 points in the K-3 Championship section.  The MSJE team is the 2014 Primary School Chess Champion.

MSJE's David Pan tied for second place in the k-5 section.

MSJE’s David Pan tied for second place in the k-5 section.

David Pan (1839) was the top rated player on our K-5 team and scored a fantastic 6 out of seven points.  David tied for second place and won a large trophy.  Kavya Sasikumar and Mihir Bhuptani each scored 4 points and Jeffrey Liu scored 3 points in this very tough section.  Our K-5 team tied for fourth place in the tournament.

Congratulations to the Chess Team for a great result at the National Championships.

 

*Former MSJE Student, Joseph Wan, took first place in the k-6 Championship division.

 

Chess students in Fremont get exciting lessons from Chris Torres.

Chess students in Fremont get exciting lessons from Chris Torres.

 

The best chess experiences of a lifetime occur at the Mission San Jose Elementary School Summer Chess Camp. The camp will take place from June 30 through July 24 at MSJE in Fremont, California. In addition to all the great chess teachers detailed above, the 2014 Summer Chess Camp at MSJE will feature all the other highly accomplished Torres Chess and Music Academy coaches as well as a formidable line up of special guest lecturers. Every child who attends all four weeks will receive a camp T-shirt, a personalized study plan, a follow up private lesson with a Torres Chess and Music Academy instructor, and a diploma presented by Susan Polgar. All school aged chess players are welcomed to sign up but this camp is expected to fill up quickly. Sign up today to avoid missing out on all the chess magic the worlds best chess coaches bring to the Mission San Jose Summer Chess Camp in Fremont, California.

Sign up today at www.ChessAndMusic.com

Children Were Checkmating Breast Cancer at a Chess Tournament in Northern, California

May 6, 2014

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Everybody was a winner at the Breast Cancer Research Chess Tournament in Fremont.

 

Fremont, California (PRWEB) May 06, 2014

On Saturday May 3, 2014, scores of children attended the Annual Breast Cancer Research Tournament held by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. In addition to the standard trophies and medals that are ubiquitous at scholastic chess tournaments, all attendees were treated to fun activities by Steve and Kate’s Camp who was the corporate sponsor for this event.

“Having Steve and Kate’s Camp at the event helped to create the chess festival atmosphere that Torres Chess and Music Academy Tournaments are known for. In addition, their sponsorship made it possible to raise money for breast cancer research while improving the overall presentation of the tournament.” -Chris Torres

In addition to Steve and Kate’s Camp counselors, there were plenty of TCAMA chess coaches on hand to help the children use this tournament as a means toward improving their chess. In particular, James Paquette was especially busy analyzing chess games and teaching notation to the younger chess players. Chris Torres described his Director of Instruction by stating that, “James Paquette is a natural educator whose love for the game of chess captures the imagination of nearly every child he instructs.”

The site for the Breast Cancer Research tournament was the campus of Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont, California. MSJE is the home of the 2013 National Elementary Chess Champions as well as the host school for the famous Fremont Summer Chess Camp. Students from MSJE didn’t let their national titles dissuade them from attending a local chess tournament that raised money for a great cause. Many MSJE students were in attendance proudly wearing the “Blue Team Shirts” which list the titles from a State Championship Dynasty that spans several decades.

For more information on this tournament, MSJE Chess and the Torres Chess and Music Academy, please visit http://www.ChessAndMusic.com.

 

Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11823309.htm

The MSJE Chess Team’s Dynasty Continues at the 2014 Calchess Super States

May 5, 2014

MSJE Head Coach Joe Lonsdale Reports on the 2014 Calchess Super States

 

A proud head coach poses with the State Championship Kindergarten team from MSJE.

A proud head coach poses with the State Championship Kindergarten team from MSJE.

The 2014 Northern California Scholastic Chess Championships were held the weekend of April 26th and 27th at the Santa Clara convention center.  Over 600 students and more the 50 schools competed in these championships.  Mission San Jose Elementary school (MSJE) of Fremont was the big winner in the Elementary School Division.  MSJE swept all of the Championships sections and won many of the Junior varsity sections and rookie sections.

The closest and most exciting championship was the Kindergarten (K) section.  Saint Marks School of San Rafael entered a nine player team in the K section.  The MSJE team won first place with 13 points versus 12.5 points by Saint Marks.  St Marks has been a scholastic powerhouse for more than 25 years.  Shreyas Jay lead the MSJE team with four wins out of five games.  Shreyas won his first four games and was playing for the state championship in the last round.  Shreyas lost in the last round but he still tied for third place.  Siddharth Arutla, Ayaan Kassamali, and Yiwen Gong each scored three points and tied for 12th place.  Jolene Liu, Zachery Easow, Vivdh Goenka, and Jasper Li also competed for the team.  All of our kindergarten students won trophies.

The top elementary school section at these championships is the 4-6 Championship Division.  MSJE won the section with 18.0 points versus 11.5 points for the second place school. (Bullis Charter school of Los Altos.) MSJE also beat all of the chess clubs (Teams made up of players from numerous schools) in this section.  The individual 4-6 championship came down to two MSJE players.  3rd grader Rishith Susarla (Who was “playing up” in the 4-6 section) was in second place with four wins and a draw.  David Pan was in first place with five wins.  Usually teammates do not play each other, but this prohibition is eliminated in the last round for the top players.  David won the final game vs. Rishith to finish with a perfect 6-0 score and won the individual Championship and the title on Northern CA Elementary School Chess Champion.  Rishith tied for fourth place.   Annapoorni Meiyappan (another third grader playing up) scored four points, won a trophy, and tied for 9th place.  Kevin Zhu scored 3.5 points and won a trophy.  Andy Tong, Max Wang, and Sriram Bharadwaj also competed for the MSJE 4-6 Championship team.

Calchess President Tom Langland with MSJE head coach Joes Lonsdale and the k-5 State Championship Team from MSJE.

Calchess President Tom Langland with MSJE head coach Joes Lonsdale and the k-5 State Championship Team from MSJE.

The 4-5 Championship section was also won by the MSJE team by a large margin.  MSJE scored 16.5 points versus 6 points for Marin School of Marin the second place school.  This score tied MSJE with the first place club, Berkeley Chess School.  Berkeley Chess School runs chess programs at more than 50 schools and their team is an all-star team from these schools.  Kavya Sasikumar was top scorer on the MSJE K-5 team.  Kavya scored five wins in six games and tied for second place.  Jeffrey Liu and Mihir Bhuptani each scored four points, tied for seventh place, and won trophies.  Jaisuraj Kaleeswaran scored 3.5 points and Alex Liu scored 3 points.  Both Jaisuraj and Alex won trophies.

The 4-6 JV (junior varsity) section is for players with ratings below 800 and above 500.  The top 12 MSJE players were playing in 4-6 championship or 4-5 championship sections.  None of the competing schools in the 4-6 JV section had more than one or two players in the championship sections.  Also MSJE only had three players in the 4-6 JV section.  The team score is the sum of the scores of the top four players on each team.  Despite these handicaps the MSJE team of Siddharth Mukherjee, Alvin Lee, and Nivedha won the first place team trophy in 4-6 JV.  Siddharth scored a perfect 5/5 and won the first place trophy.  Alvin scored 3.5/5 and won the 7th place trophy.  Nivedha scored 3/5 and won the 23rd place trophy.

The 4-6 rookie section is for players that do not have a rating.  There were several three and four player teams in this section.  Saharsh Goenka and Kevin Ma were the only two MSJE players in this section.  Kevin and Saharsh won all of their games until they had to face each other in the last round.  (Again the prohibition against team members playing is removed in the last round for the top of the ladder.)  Saharsh won the all MSJE game and the first place trophy.  Kevin tied for second place with four wins.  MSJE won the first place team trophy in the 4-6 rookie section.  I believe that this is the first time that a two player team has won first place in any division.

MSJE won the K-3 Championship section with 15 points versus 9.5 points for second place Gomes Elementary of Fremont.  Kevin Pan won his first five games and was playing for the individual championship in the last round.  Kevin lost the game, but still tied for second place and won a large trophy.  Atul Thirumalai scored four points, won a trophy, and tied for 8th place. Leo Jiang, Stephen He, and Amulya Harish scored 3 points, won trophies and tied for 25th place.  Allyson Wong, Arnav Lingannagari, Edwin Thomas, Henry Liu, Shree Jay, and Maxwell Yu also competed for the K-3 Championship team.

The k-3 Calchess State Champions from Mission San Jose Elementary School.

The k-3 Calchess State Champions from Mission San Jose Elementary School.

The 1-3 JV section is for players with ratings between 500 and 799.  MSJEs top 13 1-3 players were playing in higher sections (4-6 Championship and 1-3 Championship).  Most of the schools competing in the 1-3 JV section had very few students playing in higher sections.  MSJE won the 1-3 JV section with 13.5 points vs. St Marks with 10.5 points.  Nicholas Jiang won his first four games and was playing for first place in the last round.  Nicholas drew his game and finished in second place.  Vasu Rao, Dhruv Susheelkar, and Carolyn McNay scored three points, tied for 13th place and won trophies.

The 1-3 beginner section is for players with ratings under 500.  Vaibhav Wudaru won all five of his games and tied for first place. Evan Yang and Jack Lee each won three games and won trophies.  Suhan Khan, Lillian Ma, Soham Patti, and Varun Rao also competed for our 1-3 beginner team which took the third place team trophy.

The 1-3 rookie division is the division for players that have not played in a tournament before.  Sandeep Salwan tied for first place in this section with 5 wins out of five games. Monish Jonnadula and Aditi Sagi each scored 4 points, tied for fourth place and won trophies.  Chris Liu also competed for our 1-3 rookie team which won the first place team trophy.

Congratulations to the MSJE chess team for a great result at the State Championships.  In two weeks much of the team will be in Dallas competing in the Elementary School National Championships.

 

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Don’t forget to sign up for the annual Fremont Summer Chess Camp at MSJE. 

 

Joe Lonsdale’s Legacy to Northern California

April 24, 2014

Santa Clara, California (PRWEB) April 24, 2014

A TCAMA Instructor is Receiving the Greatest Honor Ever Bestowed on a Chess Coach from the Governing Body of Northern California Chess

 

On Saturday, April 26, while many people are still asleep, elementary school children will turn out in mass to play chess in the largest State Championship chess event on the West Coast. The k-6 section is projected to have more than 500 children and starting this year, Calchess has officially renamed their Elementary State Scholastic Championship the, “Joe Lonsdale Championship.”

Joe Lonsdale takes a moment to enjoy another Championship with MSJE students.

Joe Lonsdale takes a moment to enjoy another Championship with MSJE students.

 

Joe Lonsdale established the Mission San Jose Elementary School Chess team in 1990 for the benfit of his oldest son and has been running the program ever since. Mission San Jose Elementary School has made a habit of winning almost every State Championship title in California that they are eligible to play for and Joe’s success as the MSJE head coach is really what put Fremont Chess on the map. In fact, Joe has lead the MSJE chess team to more state championship titles than all the other schools in Northern California combined. So it is fitting that, this year, to honor Joe’s unparalleled success as a scholastic chess coach, Calchess has decided to rename the Calchess Elementary Scholastic State Championship after Joe Lonsdale.

“Joe Lonsdale successful approach to teaching chess produced the first elementary school team in the history of California to win the National Championship and the first to ever repeat the feat. Joe’s only critics are those who try and emulate his success but of course lack the chess knowledge and finesse that Joe brings to every chess class. Sadly, instead of learning from the master himself, some people would rather spend their time creating discord in the Norcal scholastic chess scene. I, however, am honored to work with and learn from Joe Lonsdale on a weekly basis. Teaching with Joe Lonsdale has been the most educational and rewarding experience of my chess career.”-Chris Torres(President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy)

After coaching his students all weekend long at the state championship named after him, Joe Lonsdale will take a short break from his chess instructing obligations before showing up to the Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School. On a daily basis during the month of July, Joe Lonsdale will make sure his students are preparing for the next school year’s chess battles. It is this kind of dedication from a head coach that is the main reason that Mission San Jose Elementary School has been the best school chess program in Northern California for decades. Joe’s influence on Norcal chess extends well beyond Mission San Jose Elementary School and children from any school or club are more than welcome to register for the Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School by visiting the Torres Chess and Music Academy online.

Original Press Release: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/04/prweb11787104.htm

Happy New Year: The Best of my Chess Musings for 2013

January 1, 2014

As I look back on the past 12-months, I can say it has been quite a year for chess! With a new World Chess Champion and business for my nonprofit booming, I anticipate another fun and exciting year in 2014. To end 2013, I have chosen to recap my most popular chess posts of this past year.

2013 was a Great Year for Chess!

2013 was a Great Year for Chess!

So enjoy this trip down memory lane and feel free to pass along your own highlights from 2013. I wish you a Happy New Year and I look forward to exploring chess with you in 2014!

 

January: Being selected for the USA vs Russia Correspondence Chess Match.

 

February: Naming of the Torres Chess and Music Academy All Star Team

 

March: My Winter report on Scholastic Chess in California

 

April: MSJE Wins the National Championship

The National Champions from MSJE

The National Champions from MSJE

 

 

May: 10 Reasons to Attend the TCAMA  Summer Chess Camp in Fremont

 

June: The Mission San Jose Elementary School Chess Camp is the Perfect Choice for Parents

 

July: The Czech is in the Mail

 

August: Great News for Bay Area Chess

 

September: Would Paul Morphy be Competitive with the Grandmasters of Today?

Paul Morphy in 1858

Paul Morphy in 1858

 

October: What is the Best Sacrifice in the History of Chess?

 

November: The World Chess Championship Match Between Anand and Carlsen

The Chess Match of the Century! (photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

The Chess Match of the Century! (photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

 

December: Hopefully this very post. Happy New Year!


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