Archive for the ‘Torres Chess and Music Academy’ Category

Fremont Scholastic Chess Championship 2019

February 16, 2019

The Learning Bee, US Chess Mates & the Torres Chess and Music Academy, Inc. Present:

The Fremont Scholastic Chess Championship!

March 16 & 17, 2019

Where: Learning Bee Learning Center, 39977 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539

What: Scholastic (K-12) 5 Round Swiss, Kindergarten (G/30) 1-4 (G/30) & 5-12 Section (G/60)

Cost: Thanks to a generous donation from Joe Lonsdale Sr., the early bird entry fee for this event is only $20!

Trophies are awarded to the top 10 in each section, top school team per section, and the top boy & girl in each grade. All other players will receive medals for participating.

Registration: Each time control (G/30 & G/60) will be limited to only the first 100 applicants. Please do not delay in registering as there is no guarantee that there will be room to register the day of the tournament.

 

USCF Rated SWISS Format: All players must be USCF members. All players must understand USCF tournament rules. USCF Membership fee is $17, per year. SWISS Format – a non-eliminating tournament format which features a set number of rounds of competition, each competitor does not play every other. Competitors play opponents with a similar running score, but not the same opponent more than once. The winner is the competitor with the highest aggregate points earned in all rounds. All competitors play in each round unless there is an odd number of players. Sets and boards provided. Clocks will be provided, but players are encouraged to bring their own.

*Round Times*

K & 1-4 G/30: 3/16 * R 1 @ 9:00am * R 2 @ 10:30am * 3/17 * R 3 @ 9:00am * R 4 @ 10:30am * R 5 @ 12:00pm

5-12 G/60: 3/16 * R 1 @ 1:00pm * R 2 @ 4:00pm *R 3 @ 7:00pm * 3/17 * R 4 @ 3:00pm * R 5 @ 6:00pm

Trophies: K & 1-4 awarded @ 2:00pm on 3/17, 5-12 Trophies awarded @ 8:30pm on 3/17

Register Online at:

http://www.fremontchess.com

Advertisements

A Friendly Rivalry: Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate

January 13, 2019
week3eight

Relaxed and highly personable, Schiller bantered amiably with the audience while presenting three of his games against Emory Tate.

 

There’s an ancient Hebrew proverb that goes something like, “The Rivalry of scholars advances wisdom.” And such was the case of the rivalry between Eric Schiller and Emory Tate. So it was a very special occasion at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp when when Eric Schiller did a two-hour lesson on his three games against Emory Tate while Tate was in the room to interject his opinions. To this day, I still receive “thank you’s” from the young chess players in the room who greatly benefited from the wisdom of these two masters.

 

img_6477

Emory Tate inspiring the next generation at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

Below is part 2 of the trilogy of chess battles between Eric Schiller (March 20, 1955 – November 3, 2018) and Emory Tate (December 27, 1958 – October 17, 2015) with notes by Schiller.

[Event "Western States Open"]
[Site "Reno, Nevada (USA)"]
[Date "2004.10.16"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Emory Tate"]
[Black "Eric Schiller"]


1.e4 {Notes by Eric Schiller.} 
1... e5 
2.Nf3 Nc6 
3.Bb5 Nge7 
4.O-O a6 
5.Ba4 b5 
6.Bb3 Ng6 
7.c3 Be7 
8.d4 O-O 
9.a4 {A new move in this rarely explored opening. It caught me off-guard and I did
not react properly.} Bb7 {?! 9...b4 was surely the correct
plan. 9...Rb8 looks dubious because of 10.axb5 axb5 11.d5 +- }

ts1

Position after 9. a4

10.d5 Nb8 { This retreat is not justified. I simply was afraid
of the plan of maneuvering my knight to c4, because I feared
that after a capture by the bishop, and recapture with my
d-pawn, that the pawn at c4 would then be a serious
weakness. 10...Na5 11.Ba2 c5 12.b4 Nc4 13.Bxc4 bxc4 14.bxc5
Bxc5 15.Na3 +0.27 would not be so bad for Black. } 

ts2

Position after 10… Nb8

11.Qe2 bxa4 { I was thinking along the lines of my game with Nicholas
Yap. that's what happens when you win a nice game, it carries
over and the next time you use the opening you tend to play
the same way, whether or not it is appropriate.} 

ts3

Position after 11… Bxa4

12.Rxa4 d6

13.Be3 {+/= No doubt about it, White has a small advantage
here. Nevertheless, Black can whip up some serious counter
play.} 

ts4

Position after 13. Be3

13... Bc8 {?! This bishop is destined to stagger drunkenly
all over the board, without having any serious effect on
White's position. 13...Nd7 would've been a much better plan
and in that case White's advantage would not have been so
significant. } 

ts5

Position after 13… Bc8

14.Nbd2 Bd7 

15.Ra3 f5 {At this point there
really isn't any other source of counterplay.} 

ts6

Position after 15… f5



16.exf5 Bxf5
17.Bc4 Bg4 
18.h3 Bc8 
19.Ne4 h6 
20.b4 {! +/- White has a dominating position and Black is suffering under the weight of
a large number weaknesses.} 

ts7

Position after 20. b4


20... Qe8 
21.Nc5 {! A powerful move! The sacrifice cannot be accepted.} 

ts8

Position after 21. Nc5


21... Bd8 { 21...dxc5 ? 22.d6+ Kh8 23.dxe7 Nxe7 24.Bxc5 is a miserable 
for Black. } 

ts10

Position after 21… Bd8

22.Ne6 Rf6

23.Nd2 Bxe6 {!? Of course that this is not the best move,
objectively. I made the capture simply because it allowed me
to develop a plan to win White's new weakling at e6, and
possibly get some counter play going by advancing central
pawns. Other moves would have left me with a miserable
position with no real chances to establish any sort of counter
play.} 

ts11

Position after 23… Bxe6

24.dxe6 Ne7 { All I have to do is somehow advance my
pawn from d6 to d5 and everything will be fine. Unfortunately
my opponent doesn't allow me to do that..}

ts12

Position after 24… Ne7

 

25.Ne4 {!} Rf8

26.Ba2 {By the way, did I underestimate this move. At the very
end of the game you will see the point.} 

ts13

Position after 26. Ba2

26... Qg6 

27.Bc1 Kh8 

28.b5 a5 

29.f4 {!} d5 { Finally! At this point, however, the move
doesn't have much of an impact and allows the knight to take
up an even better post at c5.} 

ts14

Position after 29… d5

30.Nc5 c6 

31.Qxe5 Bb6 

32.Be3 Nf5 {? Right square, wrong piece. I could have kept the game
close by moving my rook to the square. 32...Rf5 ! 33.Qd4 Bxc5
34.Qxc5 Qxe6 35.bxc6 Nbxc6 +/= } 

ts15

Position after 32… Nf5

33.Bf2 {? A serious error which allows me to get back into the game, 
but both of us mis-analyzed the position and missed the finesse at the
end. 33.Bd4 ! Nxd4 34.cxd4 cxb5 35.Bxd5 Bxc5 36.dxc5 Ra7 37.f5
was the correct plan. White's passed pawns and dominating
bishop provide a winning advantage. } 

ts16

Position after 33. Bf2

33... Re8 {? 33...Nh4 ! was the saving plan. I spotted the move, of course, 
but simply didn't date indeed enough into the position. Both players 
saw the same continuation [34.Bxd5 ! cxd5 35.Qxd5 Ra7 ! 36.Bxh4 (but here 
we both failed to spot Rf5 !) 37.Qe4 Bxc5+ 38.Bf2 Qf6 
[38...Bxa3 39.Bxa7 ] 39.Bxc5 Rxc5 40.Rxa5 Rxa5 41.e7 Rc8
42.e8=Q+ Rxe8 43.Qxe8+ Kh7 44.Qxb8 Qxc3 with a difficult but
not hopeless position for Black. } 

ts17

Position after 33… Re8

34.Bb1 {! +- The bishop slips onto the long diagonal and finishes 
off the game.} 

ts18

Position after 34. Bb1

34... Bxc5

35.Bxc5 Nd7 {I allow Emory Tate to finish the game with a
flashy tactic. Why not? He played very well.} 

ts19

Position after 35… Nd7

36.exd7 Rxe5

37.fxe5 {I resigned. My opponent at long last got his revenge
for my upset victory in the 1997 United States Masters.} 1-0

ts20

Position after 37. fxe5

 

Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate Game 1

 

Looking Back at Past Fremont Summer Chess Camps

June 14, 2018

I’m sure by now that most of trophies we handed out at the first Fremont Summer Chess Camp in 2005 are collecting dust but I remain confident that the childhood memories created there will last a lifetime. Here are some of my favorite photo memories from past Torres Chess and Music Academy summer chess programs in Fremont.

There is still time to sign up for this year’s summer chess camps. Visit www.ChessAndMusic.com today for a complete list of classes and summer camps in Fremont, Newark and Pleasanton.

TCAMA Summer Chess Skills Development Programs for Summer 2018

June 8, 2018

Don’t let your child spend another month stuck at their current rating level! Help them to grow in chess and prepare for success.

 

In one week of training with Chris Torres your child will gain:

  • The Valuable tools and skills needed to excel as a chess player.
  • An extraordinary chess camp experience with a top-tier chess instructor.
  • The confidence and motivation necessary to surpass their chess goals and fast track improvement.

 

Chris Torres has been teaching chess in the Bay Area since 1998. For 20 years his meticulous approach has paved the way for the success of his students regardless of their entry skill level. A true leader in California chess, Chris Torres creates unique a curriculum perfectly suited for each and every class he teaches. View his resume here: https://chessmusings.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/chris-torres-chess-resume/

 

The Torres Chess and Music Academy’s week-long chess skills development program helps equip elementary and middle school aged chess players with the ideal balance of foundational skills and advanced knowledge necessary to achieve sustainable improvement in chess. Sign up for these chess camps and get connected with the leading chess coach who is passionate about creating winners in every student he teaches. Classes are limited to just 10 students so every child receives personal attention. Each week long program is only $150!

Program Dates Times Location Address
P1 June 25-29 3:30 to 6:30 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P2 July 9-13 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P3 July 9-13 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P4 July 16-20 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P5 July 16-20 4:00 to 7:00 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P6 July 23-27 1:00 to 4:00 Pleasanton 4460 Black Ave., Suite A, Pleasanton
P7 July 30-Aug 3 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P8 July 30-Aug 3 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P9 August 6-10 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P10 August 6-10 4:00 to 7:00 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P11 August 13-17 12:30 to 3:30 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P12 August 13-17 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont

Please contact Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com if you have any questions. Checks should be made payable to the TCAMA 16691 Colonial Trail, Lathrop, CA, 95330, OR visit http://www.chessandmusic.com to register online.

For more information on Nurture Kids (510) 364-9322 http://www.wenurturekids.com

MSJE Chess Team Again Wins Big at Nationals!

May 17, 2018

Coach Joe’s Report on the 2018 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships (Photos by Hui Wang):

On the weekend of May 11th to 13th more than 2200 Elementary school students competed in the National Elementary School Chess Championships in Nashville, TN. This was the tenth straight year that a strong group of Mission San Jose Elementary School (MSJE) chess players traveled from Fremont, California to attend these championships and once again they brought back an impressive collection of plaques and trophies.

The overall elementary school championship is the K-6 Championship section. MSJE has won this section three times in the last five years (2013, 2015, & 2016) and four times in the past nine years (also 2009). We decided to arrange our players to maximize the chances of winning this section again. This meant moving our two top fifth graders (Aghilan Nachiappan and Allyson Wong) into K-6.  This move left us without a full team in K-5, but our two second grade stars (Kavya Meiyappan and Jason Liu) agreed to move up and play in K-5 since we did not have a full team in K-3.  (Four players is a full team.  The team score is the sum of the scores of the top four players on the team.

This left us with a K-6 team with one super star and five very strong players and a K-5 team that had a reasonable shot at a top 10 finish.

We have had a great K-1 team and I fully expected them to finish in first. I was confident enough to mention this to Chuck Graves, the MSJE principal.  MSJE won K-1 in 2012 and this team was certainly stronger than our 2012 team.

As high as my expectations were for our K-1 team the team actually exceeded expectations.  They got off to a fast start and were never in any place but first.  There were 154 players in the K-1 section.  Only six players scored six or more points.  Our top three players Artham Pawar, Lucas Jiang, and Arnam Pawar all scored 6 out of seven.  Adirya Arutla scored 5/7, Sagwartha Selvan scored 3.5/7.  Sarvesh Maniv also competed for our K-1 team.  This team won by 4.5 points which is a gigantic margin. They could have not shown up for the seventh round and still won first place.

Our K-6 team was locked in a brutal battle with three powerhouse schools form New York all weekend. They went into the last round a half point behind Speyer and a half point ahead of Dalton. These are both perennial scholastic chess powerhouses.  Kevin Pan, our top player, with 5/6 was in a battle of the individual championship.  We gained a half point on Speyer, Dalton gained a half point on us and we ended up in a three-way tie for first place.  Kevin won his game and ended up in a tie for first place.

Our K-5 team of Kavya Meiyappan, (4/7) Ayan Kassamali, (3.5/7) Jason Liu (3/7) and Jolene Liu (2.5/7) tied for seventh place.  Zahaan Kassamali also competed in K-3 (4.5/7).

Congratulations to the chess team for a great result at the National Championships.

MSJE Chess Coaches: Joe Lonsdale, Meiyaps Sathappan, Terry and Cathy Liu, Hui Wang, Nachi Nachiappan, Chris Torres

Chris Torres’ Chess Résumé

January 24, 2018

Chris Torres teaching chess (summer 2017)

 

Chris Torres

(209) 323-0197

chesslessons@aol.com · chessmusings.wordpress.com

Chris Torres is a nationally renowned scholastic chess coach working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His classes have attracted players of strengths ranging from rank beginners to world champions. A chess professional since 1998, Chris is widely recognized as one of the main driving forces behind the explosion in popularity and sudden rise in quality of scholastic chess in California.

Experience

1998 – 2000

Chess Coach, Weibel Elementary School

During his first year as a chess coach, Chris Torres helped Weibel to win the state championship and also coached his first state champion student.

2000 – 2005

Director of Instruction/Vice President, Success Chess Schools

At Success Chess, Chris Torres designed curriculum for all levels of chess players, trained over 50 instructors, established programs at 60 Bay Area schools. Chris established a strong coaching reputation by training several individual state champions each year.

2005 – Present

President, Torres Chess and Music Academy

Through the Torres Chess and Music Academy, Chris Torres has brought world class instruction to California’s most talented young chess minds. Some of his accomplishments included running a “Chess Study” with the Kern County Superintendent of the Schools and U.C. Berkeley from 2006-2008. In addition to the study, Chris was able to educate the children in Kern County’s migrant farm worker community in chess and even coach them to prestigious Southern California regional chess titles. In the Bay Area, Chris was able to instruct several individual National Chess Champions as well as coach for the Mission San Jose Elementary School chess team, which in 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018 took first place at the USCF National Elementary Chess Championship. Before 2009, no school from California had ever won the Elementary Championship section at the USCF Nationals.  In 2015 and 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy organized the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys which awarded over $100,000 in scholarships and prizes to the top youth chess players in the United States. In 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy accomplishments were officially recognized by FIDE (the world chess organization) and the TCAMA was awarded the title of FIDE Academy.

Chess Titles

2015

Correspondence Chess Master, United States Chess Federation

2015

Arena International Master, FIDE

Skills

·         Event Planning

·         Individualized Curriculum Development

·         Program Management

·         Tournament Game Analysis

·         Tournament Selection and Preparation

·         Using Chess as a Confidence Building Tool

MSJE Chess Team Shines at Calchess Grade Level Championship 

December 8, 2017

Coach Joe Lonsdale’s report on the 2017 Calchess Grade Level Championship

MSJE Chess Team (photo by Hui Wang)



Over 400 scholastic chess players competed in the Northern CA Grade level chess Championships at the Santa Clara Convention Center the weekend of December 3rd and 4th. MSJE was the big winner in the Elementary School Section. MSJE won Grades one, two, five, and six and took third place in grade 4.
In grade one there were only two players, Arthan Pawar and Arnam Pawar of MSJE, with perfect 4-0 scores after four rounds. Arthan and Arnam played each other in the last round. Arthan won to take first place with a perfect 5-0 score. Aditya Arulta, also of MSJE finished with four wins and one draw to take third place. The MSJE team took the first place team trophy with 13.5 points to 10.5 for the second place team, Basis Fremont Independent. Swagatha Selvan , Ruthvik Arumalla, Ranga Ramanujam, Prisha Agarwal, Ashwin Jegan, Keerthana Gudi, and Sunay Rao also competed for the MSJE grade one team.
In grade two Kavya Meiyappan scored 4 points and tiwd for 3rd place. Jason Liu and Jaidev Kaleesawaran each scored three wins and one draw and tied for 10th place. Allen Yang, Zahaan Kassamail, Thomas Zhang, Edward Zeng, Krish Harwani, and Dhruv Sheth also competed for the MSJE grade two team which won the first place trophy with 10.5 points to 8 points for second place Weibel.
Jolene Liu scored three wins and a draw to tie for 16th place in grade 4. Ayaan Kassamali and Siddharth Arulta each scored three wins. Ardarsh Swamuy, Vividh Goenka, and Nityasri Kolta Also competed for the MSJE 4ht grade team wich won the third-place team trophy.
In grade 5 allyson Wong lost her first game then went on to win her next five games to take tie for second place. Aghilan Nachiappan won four games losing to only the top two rated players in the section. Arna Linginnagari aslo won four games and tied for 6th place. Viabhav Wudaru Aditya Sujay and Saidvy Tunguturu also competed for the MSJE grade 5 team which won the first place team trophy.
In grade 6 Kevin Pan won all six of his games to take the first place individual trophy. Stephen He took the second place trophy with four wins and one draw. Aidan Chen tied for 11th with three wins and a draw. Nivedha Maniv and Maurya Armulla also competed for the MSJE grade six team that took thei first place team trophy.
Congratulations to the chess team for a great showing at the Grade Level Championships.

Coaches: Joe Lonsdale, Chris Torres, Meiyaps Sathappan, Terry and Cath Liu, Hui Wang, Nachi Nachiappan

  

The Torres Chess and Music Academy is Hiring in California

August 24, 2017
keep-calm-and-join-our-team-2

Apply for a job with the Torres Chess and Music Academy

After School Chess Teacher – We offer flexible schedules, good pay and excellent training for new chess teachers.

We are a well established nonprofit organization based in Northern California that offer our teachers good pay, fun assignments and opportunities for advancement.

The Torres Chess And Music Academy has instructed several individual National Chess Champions as well as coach for the Mission San Jose Elementary School chess team, which in 2009, 2013, and 2015 took first place at the USCF Super Nationals Chess Championship. The TCAMA also regularly organizes/hosts events for World Champion chess players, Fortune 500 CEO’s and celebrities. Working with us means joining the winning team!

The Job Position: We’re looking for individuals with strong people skills, experience with children, knowledge of chess and strong organizational qualities. Our teachers must be on time, provide a safe learning environment, follow our lesson plans, keep records of attendance, act professionally at all times and have fun interacting with our students.

The Location: The TCAMA has immediate openings in the Cupertino/Los Altos area and potential assignments elsewhere in the Bay Area.

Why You Should Apply:

Reason 1: Fun and Rewarding Job

Reason 2: Flexible Schedule

Reason 3:  Good Pay

Reason 4: Opportunities for Advancement

Reason 5: Joining a Winning Team

How to Apply: Email your resume (Please do not send resume as an attachment.) to chesslessons@aol.com

Fremont Master Guitarist to Begin his 48th Year at Ohlone College

August 16, 2017

Doug Torres in action.

Doug Torres, the modest guitar maestro with unparalleled teaching abilities, is about to start his 48th year as the classical guitar master at Ohlone College in Fremont, California. Creator of the Ohlone College classical guitar program in 1969, a youthful Doug Torres used his energies to establish classical guitar into the classical music establishment which at the time commonly viewed guitarists unfavorably. Over time he built the Ohlone College classical guitar from scratch and developed it to world class standards.

Doug Torres at Ohlone College in 1969,

Doug was and is a teacher of rare distinction. At 70 he remains a relevant guitarist with an easygoing personality that keeps him in demand both as a studio guitarist and as an educator. Mr. Torres credits his “mellow approach” as the secret behind his uncommon longevity as a professional guitarist. His zen-like attitude about life and music is a gift he openly shares with his students weekly at Ohlone College.

“a youthful Doug Torres used his energies to establish classical guitar into the classical music establishment…”

Born in Oakland, California to a Portuguese family of little means, Doug grew up playing the guitar. As a teenager, he studied the instrument with Bud Eastman(of Guitar Player Magazine, Guitar Showcase, Musicians Friend, etc.) and such was his progress that he placed first in several prominent international guitar competitions. As a young adult, Doug attended Cal State Hayward(now Cal State East Bay) earning degrees in BA in Music(1968) and a Masters in Music Education(1970) while simultaneously operating a popular guitar studio in Castro Valley and teaching classical guitar at Ohlone College. Beginning in 1974, Doug branched out to found guitar programs at other local colleges most notably Foothill College in Los Altos and DeAnza College in Cupertino. Worried about possible cuts in arts funding from the state of California, Doug returned to college to earn his Elementary and Secondary Teaching Credential as well as another degree in administration. Faced with the difficult challenges of providing for his family in a down economy, Mr. Torres decided to close his music studio, cancel his tours and take the steady employment of a full time elementary school teacher and part time college music educator.

In the 1970’s Doug Torres decided to cancel his tours and take the steady employment of a full time elementary school teacher and part time college music educator.

Doug’s current curriculum is based heavily on the classical heritage of Johann Sebastian Bach, Fernando Sor, Ferdinando Carulli, Mauro Giuliani, Francisco Tarrega, Isaac Albeniz, Andres Segovia and of course his own compositions. Students will learn to read music as well as use proper classical guitar technique. With six sections offered for players of varying skill levels, Doug’s Fall Semester classes at Ohlone College are the perfect option for guitarists of all abilities looking to enhance their knowledge of the instrument’s classical heritage. Class starts on Thursday evening at 6:30pm, August 31st, 2017 and will meet weekly throughout the Fall Semester in portable FP11. The price for guitar instruction with Doug Torres is approximately $46/semester and interested parties can register online by visiting http://www.ohlone.edu or walk in to register on the first night. For more information on these classes, please email Doug Torres at dtorres@ohlone.edu

California Summer Chess Fun

July 23, 2017

 To this chess coach, Summer Fun in California means exciting chess camps every week of the summer. With chess classes planned every day from Memorial Day to Labor Day, I organize events for young chess players of all skill levels, including classes with great chess teachers, rated tournaments, chess simuls against grandmasters, chess book talks with famous authors and fun blitz games against coaches. The fun continues through Labor Day leaving just enough time to prepare for my fall schedule of after school programs. 
Below are some photographs from my chess fun in California thus far this summer:

My first summer chess camp in 2017.

Two girls spending their summer studying chess.

A confident young man demonstrates his solution at summer chess camp.

Students were all ears when Grandmaster Tigran Petrosian taught strategy at our summer chess camp.

Chris Torres watches students play at summer chess camp.

IM Armen Ambartsoumian starts our summer chess camp match.

Sitting with GM Tigran Petrosian and Jay Stallings for our summer chess camp group photo.

Some young guys happy for another lesson at summer chess camp.


So many happy students and coaches on the final day of summer chess camp.


%d bloggers like this: