Archive for the ‘Veselin Topalov’ Category

Fabiano Caruana is Perfect in Strongest Chess Tournament Ever

September 2, 2014
Fabiano Caruana and Magnus Carlsen at the 2014 Sinquefield Cup.

Fabiano Caruana and Magnus Carlsen at the 2014 Sinquefield Cup.

For months, the tournament organizers have been promoting the 2014 edition of the Sinquefield Cup as the strongest chess tournament ever assembled. To Fabiano Caruana, however, the 2014 Sinquefield Cup is just a walk in the park! To be fair, the pleasantly modest  Fabiano never described it quite in that way but his actions do speak louder than Magnus Carlsen’s words. Fabiano Caruana has swept half of the world’s top ten chess players during the first five games of this double round robin event. Not since the time of Bobby Fischer has the chess world been treated to such a dominating performance on such a high stage and not since the time of Gioachino Greco has Italy been home to such a awe-inspiring chess talent.

 

Below I have assembled Fabiano Caruana’s chess games from the 2014 Sinquefield Cup and comments on his performance from chess celebrities on Twitter:

 

[Event "Sinquefield Cup"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2014.08.27"]
[EventDate "2014.08.27"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Veselin Topalov"]
[Black "Fabiano Caruana"]
[ECO "A35"]
[WhiteElo "2772"]
[BlackElo "2801"]
[PlyCount "68"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2
Nc7 7. O-O e5 8. a3 Rb8 9. d3 Be7 10. Be3 O-O 11. Rc1 Bd7
12. Nd2 Nd4 13. Nc4 f6 14. f4 exf4 15. Bxf4 Nde6 16. Bd2 b6
17. g4 Be8 18. Be1 b5 19. Ne3 Bd6 20. Ncd5 Nxd5 21. Bxd5 Bf7
22. Nf5 Be5 23. Qd2 Nd4 24. Bxf7+ Rxf7 25. Rd1 Nxf5 26. gxf5
Qd4+ 27. Bf2 Qg4+ 28. Kh1 c4 29. Qc2 Re8 30. dxc4 Qh5 31. h4
Qg4 32. Qd3 bxc4 33. Qe3 Rfe7 34. b3 Bb2 0-1

 

[Event "Sinquefield Cup"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2014.08.28"]
[EventDate "2014.08.27"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Fabiano Caruana"]
[Black "Maxime Vachier-Lagrave"]
[ECO "B12"]
[WhiteElo "2801"]
[BlackElo "2768"]
[PlyCount "59"]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Be2 c5 6. Be3 Qb6
7. Nc3 Nc6 8. O-O Qxb2 9. Qe1 cxd4 10. Bxd4 Nxd4 11. Nxd4 Bb4
12. Ndb5 Ba5 13. Rb1 Qxc2 14. Rc1 Qb2 15. g4 Bg6 16. f4 Be4
17. Rf2 Nh6 18. Bd3 Qb4 19. Rb1 Qc5 20. Nxe4 dxe4 21. Qxa5 O-O
22. Be2 e3 23. Rff1 Rfc8 24. Qe1 Qd5 25. Rb2 f6 26. Qg3 fxe5
27. fxe5 Rf8 28. Rxf8+ Rxf8 29. Qxe3 Nf7 30. Nc3 1-0


 

Me to 8 y.o “What’d you think of Carlsen-Caruana?” He revealed Magnus as hero & started crying. #awww #sinqcup http://t.co/i8e86hROBn in 20

 

[Event "Sinquefield Cup"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2014.08.29"]
[EventDate "2014.08.27"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Magnus Carlsen"]
[Black "Fabiano Caruana"]
[ECO "C24"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "68"]

1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nf6 3.d3 c6 4.Nf3 d5 5.Bb3 Bb4+ 6.c3 Bd6 7.Bg5
dxe4 8.dxe4 h6 9.Bh4 Qe7 10.Nbd2 Nbd7 11.Bg3 Bc7 12.O-O Nh5
13.h3 Nxg3 14.fxg3 Nc5 15.Bxf7+ Kxf7 16.Nxe5+ Kg8 17.Ng6 Qg5
18.Rf8+ Kh7 19.Nxh8 Bg4 20.Qf1 Nd3 21.Qxd3 Rxf8 22.hxg4 Qxg4
23.Nf3 Qxg3 24.e5+ Kxh8 25.e6 Bb6+ 26.Kh1 Qg4 27.Qd6 Rd8
28.Qe5 Rd5 29.Qb8+ Kh7 30.e7 Qh5+ 31.Nh2 Rd1+ 32.Rxd1 Qxd1+
33.Nf1 Qxf1+ 34.Kh2 Qg1+ 0-1


 

[Event "Sinquefield Cup"]
[Site "0:20:33-0:23:33"]
[Date "2014.08.30"]
[EventDate "2014.08.27"]
[Round "4"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Fabiano Caruana"]
[Black "Levon Aronian"]
[ECO "C78"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "99"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.d3 b5 7.Bb3
O-O 8.Nc3 d6 9.a3 Na5 10.Ba2 Be6 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.b4 Nc6 13.Bd2
d5 14.Re1 Qd6 15.Na2 Nd7 16.Qe2 d4 17.Reb1 Nb6 18.Nc1 Na4
19.Nb3 Rf7 20.Rc1 Rd8 21.Ng5 Rf6 22.Qh5 h6 23.Nf3 Rdf8 24.Rf1
R8f7 25.Rae1 Bf8 26.h3 g6 27.Qh4 Qe7 28.Qg3 Bg7 29.Na5 Nxa5
30.Nxe5 Nb7 31.Nxg6 Qd8 32.e5 Rf5 33.f4 c5 34.Nh4 Rh5 35.Nf3
Kh7 36.Qg4 Rhf5 37.Nh4 Kh8 38.Nxf5 Rxf5 39.Qg6 Qe7 40.g4 Rf8
41.f5 Qe8 42.Qxe8 Rxe8 43.f6 Bf8 44.f7 Re7 45.Rf6 Nb6 46.Bxh6
Nd7 47.Ref1 cxb4 48.axb4 Bxh6 49.Rxh6+ Kg7 50.Rh5 1-0


 

[Event "Sinquefield Cup"]
[Site "0:02:33-0:02:33"]
[Date "2014.08.31"]
[EventDate "2014.08.27"]
[Round "5"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Hikaru Nakamura"]
[Black "Fabiano Caruana"]
[ECO "D11"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "134"]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nbd2 Bf5 5.Nh4 Be4 6.f3 Bg6 7.e3
e6 8.g3 Be7 9.a3 Nbd7 10.cxd5 cxd5 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Bd3 e5
13.O-O O-O 14.Qb3 Qc8 15.Nb1 exd4 16.exd4 Nb8 17.Nc3 Nc6
18.Be3 Qd7 19.Rad1 Rfd8 20.Rfe1 Ne8 21.Bf2 Nc7 22.Bf1 Bf6
23.Qa2 g5 24.b4 g6 25.Qd2 Kg7 26.b5 Ne7 27.Be3 Ne6 28.Bh3 Nf5
29.Bxf5 gxf5 30.f4 g4 31.Qd3 Rac8 32.Rc1 Rc4 33.Ne2 Nc7 34.Nc3
Rc8 35.h3 gxh3 36.Kh2 Nxb5 37.Nxb5 Qxb5 38.Kxh3 Qd7 39.Kg2 b5
40.Rb1 a6 41.Rbc1 Qe6 42.Bf2 Rxc1 43.Rxe6 fxe6 44.g4 fxg4
45.Qe2 Kf7 46.Qd3 R1c2 47.Qh7+ Ke8 48.f5 Bxd4 49.Qg6+ Kd8
50.Qxe6 Rxf2+ 51.Kg3 Rc3+ 52.Kxg4 Rg2+ 53.Kf4 Rf2+ 54.Kg4 Kc7
55.Qe7+ Kb6 56.Qd8+ Rc7 57.Qxd5 Bc5 58.Qd8 Kb7 59.f6 Bxa3
60.Qd5+ Kb6 61.Qd8 Bc5 62.Qb8+ Rb7 63.Qd8+ Ka7 64.Qd5 Bb6
65.Kg5 Rc7 66.Kg6 b4 67.Qe6 Bd4 0-1

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Tromso 2014: Hikaru Nakamura Raises a Stink About Toilettes

August 7, 2014

As if on cue, Hikaru Nakamura waited until after the Kramnik – Topalov match to publicly blast the organizers of the 41st Chess Olympiad in Tromso, Norway on the restroom conditions at the chess venue. One would think the American Grandmaster would be used to win – loos situations at chess tournaments. Then again, this is supposed to be a chess tournament for elite players… not a game of thrones.

Below is the tweet concerning Toiletgate 2014:

@GMHikaru: One favor for all future Olympiads; can we please have real toilets and not portable toilets?? This is absolutely disgusting!

IMG_1131.JPG

Tromso Chess Olympiad Round 5: Kramnik vs Topalov

August 7, 2014

Thus far, the  41st Chess Olympiad in Tromso, Norway has lived up to all the hype surrounding the event. Almost all of the top chess players in the world are competing for personal glory and, more importantly, national pride. Even with hundreds of exciting games played in each round, all eyes were focused squarely onto the Russia-Bulgaria match which featured a game between the rivals, Vladimir Kramnik and Veselin Topalov.

It’s hard to believe that it has been nearly eight years since Topalov’s manager threatened to abort a World Championship Match because of complaints about Vladimir Kramnik’s bathroom habits. The publicity surrounding the complaint grew exponentially and soon there was more newspapers reporting about “Toilet Gate” than about the actual games from the match. The jokes about Kramnik’s bathroom habits took a toll on the Russian and Topalov nearly used his ill gained initiative to take the title. However, Vladimir Kramnik managed to bounce back just in time to tie the match and win in the rapid play tie-breaks. Even becoming the undisputed World Chess Champion could not take all the sting out of the cheating claims that Team Topalov attacked Kramnik with.

Fast Forward eight years and the two enemies were again separated by a mere eight chess ranks. Below is my take on Vladimir Kramnik’s beautiful win over Veselin Topalov at the 41st Chess Olympiad in Tromso, Norway.

 

[Event “41’st Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Tromso, Norway”]
[Date “2014.6.8”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Veselin Topalov”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “D37”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ QUEEN’S gam. var. WITH 5.BF4,D37]}

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.g3 O-O 6.Bg2 Nbd7 7.Qd3  Nb6 (7…c6 8.O-Ob6 9.Rd1 a5 10.b3 Ba6 11.a4 Rc8 12.Bf4 Nh5 13.Bd2 Nhf6 14.Rac1
Qc7 15.Bf4 Qa7 16.e4 Rfd8 17.e5 Ne8 18.Bf1 Nc7 19.Bg5 Bxg5 20.Nxg5
Nf8 21.Qf3 Rd7 22.cxd5 exd5 23.Bh3 Nce6 24.Nxe6 fxe6 25.Ne2 Bxe2
26.Qxe2 c5 27.f4 {…1/2-1/2, Grischuk Alexander (RUS) 2733 – Leko Peter (HUN) 2756 , Moscow 11/18/2009 It “World Blitz”})

Position after 7...Nb6

Position after 7…Nb6

8.c5 Nbd7 9.O-O c6 10.b4 b6 11.Bf4 a5 12.a3 Ba6 13.Qc2 Nh5
14.Bd2 Nhf6 15.Bf4 ( 15.Rfe1 Bc4 16.h3 Qc8 17.Bf4 Qa6 18.Rab1
Ra7 19.g4 axb4 20.axb4 Rfa8 21.Nd2 bxc5 22.bxc5 e5 23.dxe5 Ne8
24.Ra1 Qxa1 25.Rxa1 Rxa1+ 26.Kh2 Nxc5 27.Nxc4 dxc4 28.Bxc6 Rc8
29.Nd5 Bf8 30.Bb5 Ne6 31.Be3 N8c7 32.Qxc4 Nxd5 33.Qxd5 Ra5 34.Bb6
Ra3 {…1/2-1/2, Horvath Jozsef M (HUN) 2104 – Atalik Suat (BIH) 2608 , Budapest 1991 It “CANSYS”})

( 15.Rfb1 Qc8 16.e4 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 dxe4 18.Qxe4 axb4 19.Bg5 Nf6
20.Bxf6 Bxf6 21.cxb6 Bb7 22.Qe3 c5 23.dxc5 Bxa1 24.Rxa1 Ra5 25.Rc1
Rxa3 26.Qe2 Qa8 27.Nh4 Bxg2 28.Nxg2 Ra1 29.Rxa1 Qxa1+ 30.Ne1
b3 31.Kg2 b2 {0-1, Larsen Peter (DEN) 2206 – Halkias Stelios (GRE) 2570 , Helsingor 7/29/2012 It “Politiken Cup” (open)})

Position after 15. Bf4

Position after 15. Bf4

 

Nh5 16.Bd2 Nhf6 17.Rfe1 ( 17.Rfb1 Qc8 18.e4 Nxe4 19.Nxe4 dxe4
20.Qxe4 axb4 21.Bg5 Nf6 22.Bxf6 Bxf6 23.cxb6 Bb7 24.Qe3 c5 25.dxc5
Bxa1 26.Rxa1 Ra5 27.Rc1 Rxa3 28.Qe2 Qa8 29.Nh4 Bxg2 30.Nxg2 Ra1
31.Rxa1 Qxa1+ 32.Ne1 b3 33.Kg2 b2 {0-1, Larsen Peter (DEN) 2206 – Halkias Stelios (GRE) 2570 , Helsingor 7/29/2012 It “Politiken Cup” (open)})

Position after 17. Rfe1

Position after 17. Rfe1

Bc4 18.Bf4 Nh5 19.Be3 Nhf6 20.Bf4 Nh5 21.Be3 Nhf6
22.h3 h6 23.Nd2 Ba6 24.f4 bxc5 25.bxc5 Nxc5 26.dxc5 d4 27.Bf2
dxc3 28.Qxc3 Nd5 29.Qc2 Bf6 30.e4 {Vladimir Kramnik is dreaming of a position in which he is down the exchange but has a couple of passed pawns.}

Position after 30. e4

Position after 30. e4

Bxa1 31.exd5 Qf6 {?} ( 31…Bf6 32.dxe6 fxe6 33.Rxe6 Bd4 34.Rd6
Bxf2+ 35.Kxf2 Qe7 {Is a much better possibility for black.} )

32.d6 {Vladimir Kramnik achieves his first passed pawn. The chess machines prefer the line below but I think Kramnik’s choice is much more instructive.}
( 32.dxe6 Bd4 33.exf7+ Kh8 34.Nf3 Bxf2+ 35.Qxf2 Rxf7 36.Ne5 Rc7)

Position after 32. d6

Position after 32. d6

 

Qc3 33.Qd1 ( 33.Qxc3 Bxc3 34.Rd1 Be2 {is what Vesilin Topalov would have loved to see.})

Bb2 34.Bxc6 {Now that Kramnik has achieved his dream of two connected passed pawns, white is clearly in the driver’s seat.}

Position after 34. Bxc6

Position after 34. Bxc6

Rad8 {?} {Topalov panics about the passed pawns and misses a critical alternative. As we are about to witness, rooks have a very hard time stopping passed pawns from the front side.}( 34…Rab8 35.Nb1 Qf6 ( 35…Qc4 36.d7 Rfd8 37.Qd6 ) 36.Qd2 Rb3 {!} {This line seems necessary for Topalov to survive but deserves more study from chess enthusiats the world over.})

35.Nb1 {!} {Kramnik punishes Topalov!}

Qf6 36.Qd2 Rb8 {Topalov transfers his rook to the open file which is where it should have landed in the first place.}

37.Be4 {It’s been a while since we have seen Vladimir Kramnik play with this much purpose.}

e5 38.Nc3 {Perfect timing on reactivating the knight. Can you guess where Kramnik intends to place it?}

Position after 38. Nc3

Position after 38. Nc3

Qe6 {Topalov threatens the pawn on “h3.”}

39.Nd5 {Kramnik is not worried about “h3.” He has bigger fish to fry!}

Qxh3 {Topalov’s queen says, “Zdravei!”}

40.Bg2 {Kramnik’s bishop says, “Do sveedaniya!”}

Qh5 41.d7 {!}

Position after 41. d7

Position after 41. d7

exf4 42.Qxf4 Bxa3 {Topalov creates his own passed pawn.}

Position after 42... Bxa3

Position after 42… Bxa3

43.Qxb8 {!} {Vladimir Kramnik is not impressed by Topalov’s pawn grab and delivers a near fatal blow to the Bulgarian.}

Rxb8 44.Re8+ Kh7 45.Rxb8 Qd1+ {Topalov tries in vain to manufacture tactics.}
46.Kh2 Qh5+ 47.Bh3 Qf3 48.d8=Q Qxf2+ 49.Bg2 1-0

Position after 49. Bg2

Position after 49. Bg2

{Veselin Topalov resigns as he has no more reasonable chances at avoiding a loss to his rival. Besides, Vladimir Kramnik had Mate in 8: 49…Bxc5 50.Nf4 Qxf4 51.gxf4 Kg6 52.Be4+ Kh5 53.Qd1+ Be2 54.Qxe2+ Kh4 55.Bf5 h5 56.Qe1+ Bf2 57.Qxf2#}


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