Posts Tagged ‘Adi Kisieu’

Torres Chess and Music Academy All Star Team

February 12, 2013

Congratulations to Amir Dhami, Daniel Mendelevitch, Iddo Zohar, Adrian (Adi) Kisieu and Amar Dhami for being selected onto the 2013 Torres Chess and Music Academy’s All Star Team. The Torres Chess and Music Academy has many talented young chess players and the process of picking five All Stars was very difficult. These players will receive special training, comemorative shirts and free entry into the 2013 USCF United States Amateur Team West chess tournament.

Torres Chess and Music Academy All Star Team 2013

AMIR DHAMI

DANIEL MENDELEVITCH

IDDO ZOHAR

ADI KISIEU

AMAR DHAMI

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A Variation on a Theme by Morphy

June 22, 2012

Todays lesson examines the Morphy Variation of the Two Knights Defense (Fried Liver Attack.) Adi Kisieu is a talented young chess player from Oakland, California who, in this game, invented an interesting theoretical novelty on move 15 of a very frequently played opening. Unfortunately for his novelty, Adi used unfocused aggression and ended up giving his teacher a nice attack on the “g2” focal point. I am publishing this game in hopes that Adi’s “15. Nc3” is correctly attributed to him.

[Event “Chess Lesson”]

[Date “2012.06.21”]

[White “Kisieu, Adrian (Adi)”]

[Black “Torres, Chris”]

[Result “0-1”]

[ECO “C58”]

[Opening “Two Knights”]

[Variation “Morphy Variation”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {White tries for the Fried Liver Attack.} d5 {This is the most common defensive system.} 5. exd5 Na5 6. d3 {The Morphy Variation gets its name by being the favorite of Paul Morphy.} (6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Be2 h6 9. Nf3 e4 10. Ne5 Qd4 11. f4 Bc5 12. Rf1 Bb6 {Is another common continuation.}) 6. .. h6 7. Nf3 e4 {This is the best move and is rarely played in scholastic chess.} 8. Qe2 Nxc4 9. dxc4 Bc5 10. O-O O-O 11. Nfd2 (11. Ne5? Bd4 {and white’s mistake costs him a knight.}) 11. .. Bg4 12. Qe1 {White has a much better prospects for an endgame but black has better development right now.} Re8 13. Nb3 {This is a very nice move. I was expecting Nc3.} Qe7 {Black doesn’t want to trade but I was afraid of white playing h3 or c5.} 14. Nxc5 Qxc5 {So far our game is an exact copy of Stefanie Schultz vs Leonid Krugljakow, 2004.} 15. Nc3 {Adi Kisieu invents an interesting innovation. Adi is willing to give back a pawn on c4 in order to gain initiative and development.} Qxc4 16. b3 Qc5 17. Be3 {Adi develops with threats.} Qd6 18. Nb5 {A little too aggressive. The simple h3 keeps the initiative for white and is less of a commitment.} Qd7 19. Qa5 {Adi is being aggressive but lacks real purpose.} b6 20. Qa6 {Now that his queen and knight are tied up, I decide to have a go at Adi’s king.} Bf3 {“g2” is a nice focal point.} 21. gxf3 {In our game, I had calculated far enough to see if I win after this recapture by checkmate. To be honest, the line continued beyong where I could visualize.} exf3 22. Kh1 Qh3 23. Rg1 Rxe3 {It is all about analyzing checks, captures and threats.} (23. .. Ng4 24. Rxg4 Qxg4 25. Rg1 {and white survives.}) 24. fxe3 Ne4 {Threatening Nf2#.} 25. Raf1 f2 {Another easy threat to spot.} 26. Rg2 Ng3+ {Analyze checks first.} 27. Rxg3 Qxf1+ 28. Rg1 Qxg1# 0-1

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. d3 h6 7. Nf3 e4 8. Qe2 Nxc4 9. dxc4 Bc5 10. O-O O-O 11. Nfd2 11. Bg4 12. Qe1 Re8 13. Nb3 Qe7 14. Nxc5 Qxc5 15. Nc3 a new move by Adi Kisieu.


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