Posts Tagged ‘Anand-Kramnik game 3’

Anand-Kramnik: Game 5 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

October 21, 2008
Aruna and Viswanathan Anand

Aruna and Viswanathan Anand

Kramnik must be feeling miserable. Anand has beaten him with the black pieces once again. Now down two full points with 7 games to go, Kramnik must take considerable risks if he is to have any chance at becoming world champion again. Taking these risks could easily backfire and have the effect of causing this match to become a total blow-out. Below is game 5 of the 2008 World Chess Championship with my analysis:

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:12:33-0:45:33”]
[Date “2008.10.20”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “5”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Anand”]
[ECO “D49”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6 13.O-O Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Rg8 16.Bf4 Bd6 17.Bg3 f5 18.Rfc1 f4 19.Bh4 Be7 20.a4 Bxh4 21.Nxh4 Ke7 22.Ra3 Rac8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Ra1 Qc5 25.Qg4 Qe5 26.Nf3 Qf6 27.Re1 Rc5 28.b4 Rc3 29.Nxd4 Qxd4 30.Rd1 Nf6 31.Rxd4 Nxg4 32.Rd7+ Kf6 33.Rxb7 Rc1+ 34.Bf1 Ne3 35.fxe3 fxe3  0-1

15…Rg8 This is where Anand deviates from game three. In game three Anand played 15…Bd6 and 16…Rg8. In game five he reverses the order.

17. Bg3 Had kramnik played 17.Bxd6 Qxd6 18.Rfd1 e5 19.Rxd4 Qxd4 20.Nxd4 Bxg2 and Anand would  have been able to repeat the position for a draw.

18. Rfc1 Kramnik had several interesting alternatives including my choice of 18.Nxd4 f4     19.Nxe6 fxe6 20.Qxe6+ Kf8 21.Qf5+. 

18…f4 This is the reason why Anand played f5.

22. Ra3 Kramnik misses the critical 22.Bxd7 Kxd7 23.b4.

27. Re1 Kramnik’s other choices of Rd1 and b4 deserve a second look. 27.Nxd4 Qxd4 28.Rd1 Nf6  29.Rxd4 Nxg4 30.Rd7+ Kf8 31.Rxb7 Rc1+ 32.Bf1 does not need explanation.

29…Nxd4 Kramnik blunders and looses the game. 29.Nd2 d3 30.a5 Rс2 31.Bxd7 would have been  preferable. Kramnik’s chances of winning the World Championship may have just evaporated.

Advertisements

Anand-Kramnik: Game 3 from the 2008 World Chess Championship

October 18, 2008
 In game 3 from the 2008 World Chess Championships, Viswanathan Anand put on a tactical display using his fiery attacking style to beat Vladimir Kramnik into submission. Below is the game that has put Anand ahead in the match:
Photograph copyright © 2008 Frederic Friedel

Photograph copyright © 2008 Frederic Friedel

   2…c6 Anand chooses the Slav again.

4. Nc3 Kramnik chooses not to play the exchange Slav as he did in game 1. We can assume he  did not reach the desired position in game 1 and is now willing to take his chances  to see what Anand’s preparations have sprouted.

6. Be3 Kramnik chooses the Meran set up.

8…a6 Anand shows he is ready to play tactical chess. Students can easily find thousands of  great games played from this position.

14…Bb7 Another novelty from Anand’s preparation. In previous games the bishop is placed on  a6 to defend the pawn on b5. Anand chooses to use his bishop for offense instead.

15…Bd6 Anand places his other bishop on the adjacent diagonal. Both bishops are aiming at  Kramnik’scastled king. This feature, together with the semi-open “g” file are  ingredients for a devastating attack on Kramnik’s king.

16…Rg8 Anand makes use of the semi-open “g” file
18. Bf4 Kramnik does not wish to leave his king defenseless by playing 18.Nd2. Perhaps he  feared the possibility of Anand playing 18…Ke7 clearing the 8’th rank so that his  a8 rook can move to g8. This is a pretty radical idea that I am sure we will see    in a future game between top level players.

 

19. Nxf4 Kramnik refuses to play passively and sacrifices a ppiece himself. Had Kramnik  played 19.Rxd4 then Anandwould have replied with 19…Kf8! 20.Bxd7 Rd8 21.Rad1 Rxd7  22.Rxd7 Bxg3 23.hxg3 Rxg3+ 24.Kh2 Bxf3 25.Qe3 Rg2+ 26.Kh3 Qxe3 27.fxe3 Rxb2 and  black’s position looks good.

22. Qd3 Kramnik makes another strong move and proves the worthiness of his sacrifice.

24…Rd8 Anand makes a world class move and puts his rook exactly where it needs to be.
25. Qe2 This is where Kramnik’s game starts to go sour. Better was 25.Qb3 Kh8 26.Rc1!

25…Kh6 Anand is playing amazing chess. His king will be perfectly safe on h6 for the   remainder of the game.

27. a4 Kramnik plays an interesting move here. To be honest, it will take more time on my   part to determine if this is a mistake or not. I wonder what Kramnik thinks of this  move now.

29. Ra3 This is definitely a mistake. Kramnik needed to play 29.Rd1 Rg1+ 30.Kd2 Rg2.

32. f3 I believe Rd3 was preferable.

33. Bd3 This move will give Kramnik nightmares for years. Had Kramnik played 33.Kb3 Rc1   34.a5 he would have been a lot better off.

33…Bh3 All of a sudden the World Champions are playing like patzers. I have a hunch that  33…Bxd3 34.Rxd3 Qc4 35. Rc3 Qxe2 is better. In fact after winning the queen Anand has mate in 12. Even with missing the pretty finish,   Anand has a win in the bag.

 
[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:02:33-0:03:33”]
[Date “2008.10.17”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Viswanathan Anand”]
[ECO “D49”]
[WhiteElo “2811”]
[BlackElo “2803”]
[PlyCount “82”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4
b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6
13.O-O Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Bd6 16.Rd1 Rg8 17.g3 Rg4 18.Bf4
Bxf4 19.Nxd4 h5 20.Nxe6 fxe6 21.Rxd7 Kf8 22.Qd3 Rg7 23.Rxg7
Kxg7 24.gxf4 Rd8 25.Qe2 Kh6 26.Kf1 Rg8 27.a4 Bg2+ 28.Ke1 Bh3
29.Ra3 Rg1+ 30.Kd2 Qd4+ 31.Kc2 Bg4 32.f3 Bf5+ 33.Bd3 Bh3 34.a5
Rg2 35.a6 Rxe2+ 36.Bxe2 Bf5+ 37.Kb3 Qe3+ 38.Ka2 Qxe2 39.a7
Qc4+ 40.Ka1 Qf1+ 41.Ka2 Bb1+ 0-1


%d bloggers like this: