Posts Tagged ‘Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship’

Perfect Game at the National Elementary Chess Championship

June 10, 2010

Luke Zhao, a first grader from Fremont, played a perfect chess game at the 2010 Bert Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship in Atlanta, Georgia. Below is his game with notes by his chess coach Chris Torres.

[Event “Bert Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship”]
[Site “Atlanta, Georgia”]
[Date “2010.05.08”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Jha, Kubair”]
[Black “Zhao, Luke”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Giuoco Pianissimo”]
[Variation “Canal, 6…h6”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 {The Four Knights
Opening is frequently seen at scholastic chess tournaments.} 4. Bc4 {This
bishop is better placed on b5 to prevent the “Fork Trick” which continues
4… Nxe4! 5. Nxe4 d5. Black regains the sacrificed piece and maintains a
center pawn.} Bc5 {Luke chooses not to play the fork trick and instead
bring on an Italian Four Knights.} 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bxf6
Qxf6 9. Qd2? {This is a mistake. White should have taken the opportunity to
play Nd5 which forces the black queen to retreat to d8.} Bg4! {Black
threatens to capture on f3 and expose white’s king.} 10. Qe2?? {This move
is a disaster. Better would have been Nd5.} Nd4 11. Qd1?? {Rybka finds:
-1.40 11. Nxd4! Bxe2 12. Nxe2 Qg5 13. Bb3 Bb6 14. Rb1 c5 15. Nd1 Kh7.
Surprisingly white is still fighting after dropping the queen.} Nxf3+!
{Luke Zhao will now punish his opponent’s inaccuracies with perfect
tactics.} 12. gxf3 Bxf3 13. Qd2??? {White has to play Ne2 if he wants to
stay alive longer.} Qg6+ 14. Qg5 Qxg5# {Luke Zhao played yet another error
free game. This is a beautiful example of a first grader playing brilliant
chess.} 0-1

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Fremont Second Grader Wins at 2010 National Elementary Chess Championship

May 22, 2010

Second grader Ojas Arun played a very nice game in round three at the 2010 Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship. Ojas is another up and coming talent at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont, California. 

[Event “National Elementary Chess Championship”]
[Site “Atlanta, Georgia “]
[Date “2010.05.08”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Arun, Ojas”]
[Black “Paggart, Chandler”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C54”]

1. e4 {notes by Chris Torres} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {Trying for the Fried-Liver Attack} Bc5 {The wonderfully dangerous Wilkes-Barre variation.} 5. O-O {Ojas could have tried
5.Nxf7 or my favorite 5.Bxf7+. Instead he opted for the most conservative
route.} O-O 6. Nc3 h6 7. Nf3 d6 8. d3 Be6 9. Bxe6 {Taking here allows black
to have a happy rook on f8. However, I feel it is Ojas’ best move.} fxe6
10. Na4 {This is very professional . Knights on the rim are grim but Ojas’
knight can trade for black’s dark bishop.} Bb4? {This just allows c3 with
tempo.} 11. c3 Bc5 {Oh dear. Black should have played bishop a5. Now if
white plays the obvious 12.Qb3 black is in trouble.} {?!} 12. Nxe5 {This is
very tactical and I am impressed that Ojas spotted the move. However, if
black continues 12…Nxe5 13.d4 Ng6 14.dxc5 b5 he should be fine. Better
was simply playing the fork of 12.Qb3! Qc8 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.Qb5 and white is
clearly better.} Nxe5 13. d4 Neg4? {This mistakes fails to punish white’s
overly ambitious play. Now white is better.} 14. dxc5 d5 15. f3 b5? {This
is not very good as Ojas can play cxb6 en passent.} 16. fxg4? {Ojas
admitted he forgot about en passent.} bxa4 17. g5 {I would have played
17.exd5 Qxd5 18.Qxd5 Nxd5 19.Bd2 with a winnable endgame. Ojas chooses to
play the more tactical plan of exposing his opponent’s king.} Nxe4 18. gxh6
Rxf1+ 19. Qxf1 gxh6 20. Bxh6 Nxc5? {Qe7 would have been much better as
protecting the king is far more important than winning the pawn.} 21. Qf2?
{21.Qf4! Qe7 22.Qg4+ would have been much better and avoided any problems
with 21.Qf2 Ne4.} Nd3?? {This is a terrible mistake and allows Ojas to fork
the king and knight.} 22. Qd4 {I would have played Qg3+.} Qe7 23. Qxd3 Qf6
24. Qg3+ Kf7?? {Kh8 would have avoided dropping the queen.} 25. Rf1 {Game
over!} Qxf1+ 26. Kxf1 Rb8 27. Qxc7+? {27.Qg7 is a simple mate in three.}
Kg6 28. Qg7+ Kf5 29. Qg5+ Ke4 30. Qf4+? {30.Qg4 is a mate in two. Ojas
needs to work on closing out won games more accurately rather than
unintentionally torturing his opponent.} Kd3 31. Qd4+ {Ojas should just
take the rook. Perhaps his opponent would resign.} Kc2 32. Qd2+ Kb1 33.
Qd1+ Kxa2 34. Qxa4+ Kxb2 35. Qxa7 Rb3 36. Bg7 Kc2 37. Qa2+ Rb2 38. Qxb2+
Kxb2 39. h4 Kb3 40. h5 Kc4 41. h6 d4 42. cxd4 Kd5 43. h7 Ke4 44. h8=Q Kf5
45. Qh4 Kg6 46. Qf6+ Kh7 47. Bh8 Kg8 48. Qg7# 1-0

National Elementary Chess Championship: Part Three

May 10, 2010

The 2010 edition of the Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship is now history.  Once Again, Northern California has proven itself to be an ideal location for budding young chess players to grow into national champions.  Below is a list of the 2010 National Chess Champions from Northern California:

Daniel Lu scored 6/7 at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship and is a national chess champion in the K-6 section.

Allan Beilin scored 6.5/7 at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship and is a national chess champion in the K-5 section.

Weibel Elementary School Chess Team scored 17 points at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship and is a national chess champion in the K-3 section.  Michael Wang scored 5.5/7. Joanna Liu scored 4/7. Alisha Crawla scored 4/7. Serafina Show scored 3.3/7.

California also had a few second place finishes at the 2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship. Below is a list of our runner-up players:

Art Zhao tied for second place at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship in the K-5 section. 

Tanuj Vasudeva tied for second place at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship in the K-3 section.  Times are interesting when a third grade Fide Master comes up short in a K-3 chess tournament!

Mission San Jose Elementary School placed second at the  2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship in the K-1 section.  John Chan scored 5.5/7. Luke Zhao Scored 5/7. Mihir Bhuptani scored 5/7. Soorya Kuppam scored 4/7. 

This is the second year in a row that a school from Fremont, California has won a national chess championship. In 2009, Mission San Jose Elementary School was crowned National Elementary Chess Champion by the United States Chess Federation at the National Elementary Chess Championship. This year Weibel Elementary School tied for first in the K-3 section at the 2010  Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship. I am one of the lucky few chess coaches to have taught chess at both of these schools and am proud that Fremont is now surpassing New York City as the Scholastic Chess Capital of the United States.  Bay Area scholastic chess players are invited to participate in a summer chess camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont. Visit www.ChessAndMusic.com for more details.


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