Posts Tagged ‘chess class’

Fremont Summer Chess Camp: Preview 5

June 12, 2013

There are many reasons why the Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School is the perfect choice for your child. One, however, has little to do with chess.

Students who attend the Mission San Jose Elementary School Summer Chess Camp in Fremont will receive an exclusive deal from the Achiever Institute. The Achiever Institute, Fremont’s premier after school learning center, has teamed up with the Torres Chess and Music Academy to provide after camp care for all Fremont Summer Camp students who desire it. For only $10/hour, the Achiever Institute will allow your child to attend all the age-level courses Achiever offers starting at 3:00 when our chess camp gets out. Children who use this option will take part in several of the enrichment opportunities Achiever offers from instructors who are at the top of their respective fields. In addition, chess campers will also receive additional training from Chris Torres

Students studying chess at the Achiever Institute in Fremont, California.

Students studying chess at the Achiever Institute in Fremont, California.

while he teaches his regularly scheduled chess classes at the Achiever Institute. The Torres Chess and Music Academy is excited to offer its summer camp students this exclusive opportunity. Sign up today at: http://chessandmusic.com/applications/view?id=3

Fremont Summer Chess Camp 2013: Preview 3

May 30, 2013

 

Francisco Anchondo once brought his beloved service dog to meet World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov.

Francisco Anchondo once brought his beloved service dog to meet World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov.

Every year Francisco Anchondo returns to Mission San Jose Elementary School to put on another exciting show full of opening traps and tactical brilliances for our students at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp. Francisco Anchondo has been teaching chess for decades and regularly coaches many of the top players from around Northern California. A recent article on our chess camp included a nice description of Mr. Anchondo’s contributions to chess and society:

Francisco Anchondo returns for his third year of teaching at the Fremont Summer
Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School. Francisco regularly competes
in chess tournaments in several western states as well as in Mexico. Francisco
Anchondo is feared for his tactical bravado at the chess board while loved for
his generosity in providing chess lessons to economically disadvantaged children
and schools. Outside of chess, Francisco is an advocate for veterans of war and
a role model for other Gulf War Vets.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/All-Star-Chess-Coaches-Gear-Up-for-Fremont-Chess-4545418.php#ixzz2UjRAjmAi

 

Fremont Summer Chess Camp

April 3, 2011

Mission San Jose Elementary School Summer Chess Camp

Home of the 2009 NATIONAL ELEMENTARY CHESS CHAMPIONS!

 This camp will feature chess instruction by:

  • Joe Lonsdale (Head Coach of Mission San Jose Elementary School)
  • Francisco Anchondo (Team Coach for Weibel Elementary School)
  • Tans Hylkema (Team Coach for Collins Elementary School)
  • Chris Torres (President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy)

 

Our coaches will use their decades of chess teaching experience to create a summer camp that is fun, competitive and educational.  Attendees will receive the best training available and take part in USCF rated tournaments with awards given at the end of each week. 

This class will meet from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, Mondays through Thursdays,

June 27 to July 28 at Mission San Jose ES, 43545 Bryant St. Fremont, CA 94539. 

Name of child: _______________________________________   Grade:  ____  

Parents (Guardian) name(s):  _____________________________________

Address:  ____________________________________________________

City: ________________________________   California Zip:  __________

Telephone:  (___) _________   E-mail:  _____________________________

USCF ID: ______________   Rating:  _______ Date of Birth: ___/___/______              

 CHESS SKILL LEVEL—PLEASE CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX

1 Absolute Beginner-doesn’t even know the pieces                    

1 Beginner-knows the names of the pieces and that is about all

1 Intermediate Beg-knows how to play and how to castle           

1 Advanced Beginner-knows how to play & even knows en passant

1 Experienced-has taken chess lessons                                      

1 Tournament-has played more than 25 games in US Chess Federation tournaments

I AM PAYING     WEEK/S ATTENDING    

MULTI WEEK DISCOUNT

SUBTRACT AMOUNT BELOW FROM THE

  FOR ONE WEEK      $185 JUNE 27 – JUNE 30   TOTAL WEEKS
  FOR TWO WEEKS      $139 JULY 5 – JULY 7      -$20 FOR TWO WEEKS
  FOR THREE WEEKS      $185 JULY 11 – JULY 14      -$40 FOR THREE WEEKS
  FOR FOUR WEEKS      $185 JULY 18 – JULY 21      -$80 FOR FOUR WEEKS
  FOR ALL FIVE WEEKS      $185 JULY 25 – JULY 28      -$160 FOR FIVE WEEKS
  $16 FOR A USCF MEMBERSHIP   $   SUBTOTAL   $                    TOTAL PAID

 

To apply online, or for more information on the TCAMA, please visit CHESSANDMUSIC.COM, or contact Chris Torres at (209)234-2862, or chesslessons@aol.com.

The checks should be made payable to The TCAMA Inc. The fees for the chess program are nonrefundable after the class has begun. No refunds will be given for unscheduled student absences.

Please make the checks out to TCAMA Inc. and Mail them to:

The Torres Chess and Music Academy, 16691 Colonial Trail, Lathrop, CA 95330

On the Eve of Greatness: Three California Chess Prodigies Competing in their First National Chess Championship

December 10, 2010

Tomorrow three of my favorite chess students will begin play at the 2010 National K-12 Chess Championship in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. As the President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy, I have had the distinct pleasure of coaching many of the top ranking scholastic chess players in the United States and can comfortably state that the three players described below are among the finest young chess players I have ever coached.
   In 2009, then Chinese citizen Chenyi Zhao impressed her Country by placing very highly at a prestigious chess tournament in Beijing. Although only 5, it seemed Chenyi was destined to be placed in a state run chess school for the extremely gifted. Within a few short months, Chenyi Zhao had immigrated to the United States and found herself in Fremont, California attending chess classes run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. Chenyi is now considered one of the top chess players for her age in California and a serious contender for a top place finish at the 2010 National Scholastic Chess Championship.
   Milind Maiti appeared in the Collins Elementary School Chess Team in September of 2010. Because the Collins Chess Team is run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy, it was no small accomplishment that Milind progressed to the “Advanced” class by week two. Milind posseses natural tactical abilities that are beyond anything one would expect from a Kindergartener. He is truly a chess prodiogy of the highest level and will be a contender in the 2010 National Scholastic k-12 chess championship.
   For months before I received the fateful email, I had been eyeing Ben Rood’s chess games with the opinion that Ben was destined to be a national chess champion. (Having worked with several national chess champions and one world chess champion, I tend to gauge talent very accurately.) Aproximately eight months after I first noticed Ben Rood, his mother emailed me inquiring about private chess lessons for Ben. It turned out that Ben was only willing to accept private chess lessons from Chris Torres. I immediately accepted and now train with Ben Rood weekly in Walnut Creek. Observing Ben Rood’s growth under my tutoring for the past few months is exceptionally rewarding and I feel blessed to be a part of his learning process. In fact, chess comes so easily for Ben Rood that it is my professional opinion that Magnus Carlsen should start preparing for him immediately!
   In conclusion, should any child be unfortunate enough to sit across from Chenyi Zhao, Milind Maiti or Ben Rood at the 2010 National K-12 Chess Championship…they should be verrrry afraid!

Don’t hesitate  to sign your child up for chess classes run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. For more information be sure to visit www.ChessAndMusic.com

On the Eve of Greatness: Three California Chess Prodigies Competing in their First National Chess Championship

December 10, 2010

Tomorrow three of my favorite chess students will begin play at the 2010 National K-12 Chess Championship in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. As the President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy, I have had the distinct pleasure of coaching many of the top ranking scholastic chess players in the United States and can comfortably state that the three players described below are among the finest young chess players I have ever coached.
   In 2009, then Chinese citizen Chenyi Zhao impressed her Country by placing very highly at a prestigious chess tournament in Beijing. Although only 5, it seemed Chenyi was destined to be placed in a state run chess school for the extremely gifted. Within a few short months, Chenyi Zhao had immigrated to the United States and found herself in Fremont, California attending chess classes run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. Chenyi is now considered one of the top chess players for her age in California and a serious contender for a top place finish at the 2010 National Scholastic Chess Championship.
   Milind Maiti appeared in the Collins Elementary School Chess Team in September of 2010. Because the Collins Chess Team is run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy, it was no small accomplishment that Milind progressed to the “Advanced” class by week two. Milind posseses natural tactical abilities that are beyond anything one would expect from a Kindergartener. He is truly a chess prodiogy of the highest level and will be a contender in the 2010 National Scholastic k-12 chess championship.
   For months before I received the fateful email, I had been eyeing Ben Rood’s chess games with the opinion that Ben was destined to be a national chess champion. (Having worked with several national chess champions and one world chess champion, I tend to gauge talent very accurately.) Aproximately eight months after I first noticed Ben Rood, his mother emailed me inquiring about private chess lessons for Ben. It turned out that Ben was only willing to accept private chess lessons from Chris Torres. I immediately accepted and now train with Ben Rood weekly in Walnut Creek. Observing Ben Rood growth under my tutoring for the past few months is exceptionally rewarding and I feel blessed to be a part of his learning process. In fact, chess comes so easily for Ben Rood that it is my professional opinion that Magnus Carlsen should start preparing for him immediately!
   In conclusion, should any child be unfortunate enough to sit across from Chenyi Zhao, Milind Maiti or Ben Rood at the 2010 National K-12 Chess Championship…they should be verrrry afraid!

Don’t hesitate  to sign your child up for chess classes run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. For more information be sure to visit www.ChessAndMusic.com

Chess in Albany, California

August 30, 2010

Below is an exciting chess battle between two brothers at the 2010 Albany Chess Summer Camp.

[Event “Albany Chess Camp”]
[Site “Albany”]
[Date “2010.08.11”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Xu, William Young”]
[Black “Xu, Thomas (Taotao)”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C55”]
[Opening “Two Knights”]
[Variation “4.d3 Be7 5.Bb3 O-O”]
[Comment “Battle of the Brothers”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 d6 {Better is 3…Bc5
or 3…Nf6.} 4. Nc3 {White should take advantage of black’s passive play
and move d4!} Nf6? {Better would have been 4…Bg4 which prevents 5.Ng5!}
5. d3? {Misses the afformentioned punishment.} Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 … 7. Qxf3
Nd4 8. Qd1 Be7 9. Be3 O-O 10. Qd2 {I prefer o-o} a6 11. O-O-O? {Kingside
should be preferable as black has an easy pawn storm now.} b5! 12. Bb3
Nxb3+ 13. axb3 b4 14. Na4 c5? {14…d5! would have continued the
punishment. Black’s choice make is diificult form him to free the knight on
f6 or bishop on e7.} 15. g4! {Here comes white.} h6 16. g5? {16. f4 makes
more sense.} Nh5?? {16…hxg5 and black is fine.} 17. gxh6 gxh6 18. Rhg1+
Kh8 19. Bxh6 Rg8 20. Bg7+?? {This is a huge blunder. If black plays Rxg7 he
will be winning.} Nxg7??? 21. Qh6# 1-0

Sign up your child for chess classes in Albany by visiting: http://www.albanyca.org/index.aspx?page=537

or http://www.ChessAndMusic.com

Chess Camps Keep California Kids Busy

August 30, 2010

A children’s chess camp run by the Torres Chess and Music Academy is the ideal way for chess players to improve during school breaks. Children are separated into groups based on rating and age so that each class represents the closest chess experience grouping possible.  All Torres Chess and Music Academy camps have a group of outstanding master chess teachers on hand to review the child’s game as soon as he/she finishes it. At the Torres Chess and Music Academy, a loss is never just a loss. Instead a loss is a unique opportunity to grow as a chess player under the supervision of the very best chess coaches.
   This past summer, the Torres Chess and Music Academy ran chess camps in Fremont, San Jose and Albany

Children playing chess over the summer.

.  On hand were scores of enthusiastic young chess players as well as TCAMA coaches Chris Torres, Tans Hylkema, and Joe Lonsdale. Plenty of children left with trophies while even more left with consolation prize medals. All children who attended our chess camps left with a better understanding of chess than they arrived with.

Fremont Summer Chess Camp: Day Two

June 30, 2010

Jeffrey Wei was the star of our chess camp on day two. During the school year I had the pleasure of watching Jeffrey play every week at  Mission San Jose Elementary School. His chess abilities have quickly established him as one of the top players for his age in the country. Below is a fine example of Jeffrey’s play on board 1:

[Event “Fremont Chess Summer Camp”]
[Site “MSJE”]
[Date “2010.06.29”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Wei, Jeffrey”]
[Black “Zhang, Alvin”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C48”]
[Opening “Four Knights”]
[Variation “Spanish, Classical, Bardeleben Variation”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {Jeffrey scores well
with the Ruy Lopez.} Nf6 4. Nc3 {If you wish to avoid the Spanish Four
Knights you can play O-O.} Bc5 {This of course allows the notorious “Fork
Trick.” Watch whites next two moves and you will know why it is called the
fork trick. Black should have played Bb4 or Nd4.} 5. Nxe5 Nxe5 6. d4 Bd6
{This is one way to deal with the “Fork Trick.” Black could have also
played a6 or Bb4.} 7. dxe5 Bxe5 {Black’s method involves the threat of Bxc3
which would leave white with a porr pawn structure.} 8. Bg5 {Bd2 would have
protected c3 from capture by black’s bishop.} h6 {I prefer c6 here.} 9. Bh4
{Once again, white can avoid a pawn weakness by playing Bd2.} c6 {A very
nice move which prepares b5 with tempo.} 10. Bc4 {Bd3 avoids being chased
by another pawn push.} b5 {Black has the advantage now.} 11. Bd3 b4 12. Na4
{Knights on the rim are grim. Better was Ne2.} d5 {Alvin misses the
tactical Qa5!.} 13. exd5 cxd5 {A small mistake. Now white can strike back
with Bb5+.} 14. O-O {Jeffrey chooses to castle before attacking.} Bb7 {This
move can punished by Re1 or Qe2. Black can not save their Bishop from the
pin after white plays f4.} 15. Nc5 {This is good but not as good as Re1 or
Qe2.} Bc6 16. Rb1 {Re1 is superior for reasons stated before.} Qe7 {Qd6
creates threats on c5 and h2.} 17. Nb3 O-O {This was long overdue. Now
black is out of trouble.} 18. Re1 Qd6 19. Bg3 Bxg3 20. hxg3 d4 {Looses a
pawn on d4. Black should have placed the “f” rook into the open “e” file.}
21. Nxd4 {Jeffrey demonstrates why tactics win chess games.} Qxd4 {This is
a terrible mistkae.} 22. Bh7+ Kxh7 23. Qxd4 Rad8 24. Qxb4 Rb8 25. Qc5 Rbc8
26. Qxa7 Ra8 27. Qc5 Bd5 28. c4 Be4 {Another tactical blunder.} 29. Rxe4
Nxe4 30. Qf5+ g6 31. Qxe4 Rxa2 32. b4 {Whites plan is simple. Move the
passed pawns forward and look for fork possibilities.} Ra6 33. b5 Re6 34.
Qd5 Rf6 35. b6 Rf5 36. Qd7 Rb8 37. b7 Rc5 38. Qd6 Rxc4 39. Qxb8 h5 40. Qf8
Rc7 41. b8=Q f5 42. Qh8# 1-0

Fremont Summer Chess Camp 2010: Day One

June 29, 2010

Forty children signed up for the first week of our annual chess camp in Fremont. Participants were attracted by the affordable price, world-class chess instruction and comfortable location. Ojas Arun had a particularly good first day at the Mission San Jose Elementary Chess Camp. Ojas managed to beat his coach (Chris Torres) while Chris was eating lunch. After lunch Ojas went on to win round one of our rated tournament in style. Below is his game:  

[Event “Fremont Summer Chess Camp”]
[Site “Fremont (MSJE), CA”]
[Date “2010.06.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Arun, Ojas”]
[Black “Gharpuri, Akshay”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C55”]
[Opening “Two Knights”]
[Variation “Perreux Variation”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4! {A more conservative
approach involves playing d5 here.} 6. Bxf7+ Kxf7 7. Ng5+ Kg8! {This is
actually best! Black can now refute white’s attack but will be
uncomfortable for a long time.} 8. Qf3?! {I discovered this years ago with
a mouse-slip in an online blitz game. The move is considered dubious but
wins quite often.} Ncxe5?? {Black needs to play Bc5+ creating a square for
his king to escape. Ngxe5 is equally as bad!} 9. Qd5+! {Crime and
punishment. A question mark move followed by an exclamation mark move.} Nf7
10. Qxf7# 1-0

San Jose Chess Club at Little Genius Learning Center

June 11, 2010

 San Jose Chess Club at Little Genius Learning Center

1556 South De Anza Boulevard, San Jose, California

The San Jose Little Genius Chess Club meets every Saturday from 4:00pm until 6:30pm, beginning in September 2010.

 

The San Jose Little Genius Chess Club is a very special chess program designed and taught by nationally renowned chess instructor Chris Torres.  This class will provide experienced tournament players with instruction that will quickly increase their ability and understanding of chess. Participants will begin their evening by participating in an hour long chess class taught by Chris Torres (coach for the 2009 National Elementary Chess Champions). A 30 minute pizza break will be next. Students will then play 1 USCF rated chess game as part of the ongoing tournament and receive analysis of their play. All participants must be members of the USCF. If your child is not a member, your child can join or renew their USCF membership at the first meeting, or by going to uschess.org. The cost for this program will be $18/session.

A USCF ID number is required in order to participate in the tournament.

 

 

For more information on the Torres Chess and Music Academy please visit www.chessandmusic.com.

 


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