Posts Tagged ‘chess Germany’

15 Days Until The World Chess Championships

September 29, 2008

Tonight we look at another brilliancy from the current World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand. This game was played before Anand was World Champion and after his opponent Anatoly Karpov had lost his title to Garry Kasparov. Once again we see Anand’s desire to be adventurous in the opening by playing the off-beat line 4. e4 rather than e3. The latter would have lead to traditional Queen’s Gambit Accepted lines. On move 17. Be2 Anand starts a redeployment of his bishop which eventually joins an attack on Karpov’s king with the move 20. Bd3 and then 21. Bxh7! Anatoly Karpov’s fatal inaccuracy occurred when he played 23… Bxe5.  23…f6 would still have left Karpov with plenty of issues but is an improvement. On move 36 Karpov lost on time. 


[Event “?”]
[Site “Las Palmas,ESP”]
[Date “1996.??.??”]
[White “Anand,Viswanathan”]
[Black “Karpov,Anatoly”]
[Round “7”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “A06”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 e6 3. c4 dxc4 4. e4 b5 5. a4
c6 6. axb5 cxb5 7. b3 Bb7 8. bxc4 Bxe4 9. cxb5
Nf6 10. Be2 Be7 11. O-O O-O 12. Nc3 Bb7 13. Ne5
a6 14. Bf3 Nd5 15. Nxd5 exd5 16. Rb1 Qb6 17. Be2
axb5 18. Rxb5 Qc7 19. Bf4 Bd6 20. Bd3 Ba6 21. Bxh7+
Kxh7 22. Qh5+ Kg8 23. Rb3 Bxe5 24. Rh3 f6 25. dxe5
Qe7 26. Qh7+ Kf7 27. Rg3 Ke8 28. Rxg7 Qe6 29. exf6
Nc6 30. Ra1 Kd8 31. h4 Bb7 32. Rc1 Ba6 33. Ra1
Bb7 34. Rd1 Ba6 35. Qb1 Rxf6 36. Bg5 1-0

Vladimir Kramnik in Germany

September 27, 2008

   The upcoming World Championship Chess Match against Viswanathan Anand is not Vladimir Kramnik’s first chess match in Germany. In July of 2000 Kramnik played another high profile match in Deutschland. This time his opponent was the highly touted computer program Deep Junior. Because his opponent was a computer, Kramnik used anti-computer strategy that would not work against someone like Anand. This does not take anything away from Kramnik’s achievement in the game below. His play was nothing short of brilliant.
   Playing 2. e3, Kramnik is obviously playing a slightly inferior move to take the computer out of its opening book. Kramnik’s strategy is to eliminate any opening advantage the computer may have and then lock up the pawns to reduce the computer’s calculation advantage. Kramnik then will use the human advantage of being able to form a long term plan to set up a position that favors the human. Its amazing how coordinated Kramnik’s pieces become after 23. Bd1. His bishop, 2 rooks, queen and knight are all focused on Deep Junior’s king. In contrast, Deep Junior showed little understanding of what was happening when Kramnik played his 12, 15 and 18 move. Becuse of this lack of understanding the aspects of the advancing pawns in a closed position, Deep Junior’s pieces are caught in the wrong locations late in the game. After 25. e4 Kramnik unleashes his dark square bishop thus using all his pieces together in the same attack. The rest of the game Kramnik plays with the great accuracy that is needed to defeat a strong computer opponent.

 

 

[Event “SuperGM”]

[Site “Dortmund GER”]

[Date “2000.07.12”]

[EventDate “2000.07.07”]

[Round “5”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]

[Black “Junior (Computer)”]

[ECO “D00”]

[WhiteElo “2770”]

[BlackElo “?”]

[PlyCount “65”]
1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Bd3 e6 4. f4 Be7 5. Nf3 c5 6. c3 O-O
7. Nbd2 Ng4 8. Qe2 c4 9. Bc2 f5 10. Rg1 Nc6 11. h3 Nf6 12. g4
Ne4 13. Qg2 g6 14. Qh2 Kh8 15. h4 Nxd2 16. Bxd2 fxg4 17. Ng5
Qe8 18. h5 gxh5 19. Rxg4 Rf6 20. Rh4 Rh6 21. O-O-O a5 22. Rh1
b5 23. Bd1 Ra7 24. Bxh5 Qf8 25. e4 Bd8 26. f5 b4 27. Bg6 Rxh4
28. Qxh4 bxc3 29. bxc3 Bf6 30. Qxh7+ Rxh7 31. Rxh7+ Kg8
32. Bf7+ Qxf7 33. Rxf7 1-0


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