Posts Tagged ‘chess homework’

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 47

November 8, 2019

White to move and mate in 4 (Milan Vidmar – Max Euwe, 1929).

White to move and mate in 4 (Milan Vidmar – Max Euwe, 1929).

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 113

November 4, 2019

White to move and mate in 3.

White to move and mate in 3.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 112

November 1, 2019

White to move and mate in three.

White to move and mate in three.

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 46

October 26, 2019

White to move and win! (H. Rinck, Deutche Schachzeitung, 1912)

White to move and win! (H. Rinck, Deutche Schachzeitung, 1912)

So I was just playing a game of chess and then this happened! 32

October 10, 2019

White to move and mate in two.

White to move and mate in two.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 111

October 6, 2019

I especially enjoy chess puzzles that are more complicated than they seem at first. Here is a simple looking mate in 2. Not so simple.

White to move and mate in 2.

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 31

October 1, 2019

Not to hard to spot but very satisfying to play. Black to move and and crush white!

Black to move and and crush white!

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 30

September 19, 2019

Black to move and win!

Black to move and win!

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 110

September 18, 2019

A remarkable position occurred after white played 47. Qxg3 in the game Samuel Sevian vs. Sergey Karjakin, FIDE World Cup 2019. Karjakin has only three legal responses as black and each would directly result in a different outcome (a win, a loss or a draw.)

Black to move and win, lose or draw! (Samuel Sevian – Sergey Karjakin, World Cup, Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, 2019.09.10.)

Shelby Lyman (1936-2019)

August 21, 2019

On Sunday August 11th, famous chess educator Shelby Lyman passed away. You didn’t have to know Shelby to be impressed by his impact on American chess. Through his students, newspaper columns and television appearances, Shelby Lyman has left us with a deep and enduring legacy.

Shelby Lyman on television in 1972.

Older chess enthusiasts will remember Shelby as the chess teacher who captivated a surprisingly large audience with his televised analysis of the 1972 Fischer-Spassky World Championship. Using the initiative he gained from this newfound fame, Shelby Lyman focused his energy toward authoring a syndicated chess column that was read in newspapers across the nation until his death. “This will be the last set of chess quizzes,” wrote Michele Merrell last week in an email addressed to all the publications that still printed her husband’s column. “It was his great pleasure to be part of your papers for all these years.”

As a chess teacher, I feel a special duty to share the legacy and history of those who came before me. Below are some special homework assignments I created for this purpose from Shelby Lyman’s long running newspaper column. Enjoy and share…

Shelby Lyman homework 1

Shelby Lyman homework 2


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