Posts Tagged ‘chess match’

Russia vs USA Chess Match

January 3, 2013
Let the Games Begin

Let the Games Begin

Forty years after the greatest American chess player, Bobby Fischer, slayed Boris Spassky and the Russians to win the World Chess Championship, another classic chess battle between East and West will taking place. Officially starting on February first, 2013, Russia and the United States will do battle in a correspondence chess match for honor and pride. The last time a match such as this occurred was in 1982 when the Soviets crushed the Americans. This time round, the players representing the United States aspire to even the score.

I am honored to be representing team USA on board 16 versus the infamous Russian chess master, Andrey Terekhov. Mr Terekhov has already earned the title of FIDE Master and appears to be on his way toward earning an International Master title in correspondence chess. Andrey’s successes on the chess board are only matched by his achievements in computer science. On occasion, Andrey Terekhov is able to combine his hobbies as can be seen in a recent article about his simul versus the Caltech Chess Club.

For the next month, leading up to my first move, I will be busy preparing inventions and traps and placing them in a folder marked “Andrey Terekhov.” Should he attempt to alter his play to avoid my mischief, I look forward to unleashing some unexploded opening bombs that I have been waiting for an opponent of his caliber to victimize with. Serious correspondence chess players understand the need for preparation and I take my correspondence chess games very seriously.

Below are the top 20 boards for the upcoming Russia vs. United States of America correspondence chess match:

Russia                                                                          United States

Board 1   SIM Yamaliev, Vil Usbekovich  2462 . . . .   IM Belka, Wieland  2460
Board 2   IM Gerbich, Vladimir Fedorovich  2452 . . . .   SIM Knudsen, John C.  2443
Board 3  IM Balabanov, Viktor Viktorovich  2437 . . . .   SIM Millstone, Dr. Michael  2442
Board 4   Dolin, Boris Lukianovich  2426 . . . .   SIM Biedermann, Thomas  2430
Board 5   Pavlov, Viktor Aleksandrovich  2419 . . . .   Ingersol, Harry  2401
Board 6   Gudzovaty, Yury Vasilievich  2407 . . . .   Holroyd, Kenneth  2397
Board 7   SIM Baklanov, Valentin Petrovich  2393 . . . .   O’Connell, C.  2392
Board 8   Budkin, Gennady Aleksandrovich   2393 . . . .   Fass, Robert N.  2386
Board 9   IM Ivanov, Boris Vladimirovich  2384 . . . .   IM Ballow, John  2383
Board 10   Kazantsev, Renal Aleksandrovich  2367 . . . .   Horwitz, Daniel M.  2358
Board 11   Ananskikh, Evgeny Nikolaevich  2360 . . . .   IM Musitani, Cesar  2348
Board 12   Volodarsky, Yury Aleksandrovich  2357 . . . .   Meiners, Edwin  2336
Board 13   Chukanov, Igor Anatolievich   2352 . . . .   IM Schakel, Corky  2337
Board 14   Butov, Yury Alekseevich  2349 . . . .   Woodard, Daniel S.  2327
Board 15   Gus’kov, Viktor Vladimirovich  2346 . . . .   Parsons, Larry  2316
Board 16   Terekhov, Andrey Andreevich  2346 . . . .   Torres, Chris  2300
Board 17   Mishin, Anatoly Valentinovich  2343 . . . .   Brooks, Michael  2290
Board 18   Volkov, Aleksandr Valentinovich  2319 . . . .   Gleyzer, Leonid  2284
Board 19   Borisenkov, Dmitry Vasilievich  2318 . . . .   White, David V.  2270
Board 20   Selin, Sergey Gennadievich  2292 . . . .   Merrell, William S.  2232
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Viswanathan Anand

September 23, 2008

Viswanathan Anand was born on December 11, 1969 in Madras India. At the age of 14, Vishy won the 1983 National Sub-Junior Chess Championship with a score of 9/9. A year later he became India’s youngest player ever to achieve the International Master title. In 1987, Anand became the first Indian to win the World Junior Chess Championship. The following year he became India’s first ever Grand Master. After several tries, Anand was recognised as World Champion by FIDE after defeating Alexei Shirov 3.5 – 0.5 in 2000. Vishy never received the recognition he deserved due to the fact that he did not defeat Garry Kasparov to win the title. Anand captured the title again in 2007 by way of a FIDE tournament. This time around, Anand’s critics point out that he did not win the World Championship through match play which was the historical standard for the title. Viswanathan Anand can silence these critics by defeating Vladimir Kramnik in the World Championship match beginning on October 14, 2008.
   Below is an outstanding game played by Anand in 2001. The first 13 moves are all book in the petroff defense. Perhaps Piket should have played 13… f6 which is favored by a lot of top players. 15. Nh4 is Anand’s evil invention which confused his opponent. Piket’s 19… bxc5 helped Anand develop his final combination by freeing up the d4 square for the bishop. This game is an outstanding example of why Viswanathan Anand is one of my all time favorite chess players.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
[Date “2001.??.??”]
[White “Anand,V”]
[Black “Piket,Je”]
[Round “11”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2790”]
[BlackElo “2632”]
[ECO “C42”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4
d5 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. c4 c6 9. Re1
Re8 10. Nc3 Nxc3 11. bxc3 Bg4 12. Bg5 Rxe1+ 13. Qxe1
Qd7 14. c5 Bc7 15. Nh4 h6 16. Bd2 Qd8 17. f4
Bc8 18. Qg3 b6 19. Re1 bxc5 20. dxc5 Qf8 21. Be3
Na6 22. Bd4 g5 23. Qf2 1-0


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