Posts Tagged ‘chess miniature’

Playing Blindfold Chess

May 19, 2019

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need a photographic memory to be proficient at blindfold chess. The basic visualization required is really not all that different from the kind of mental exercise chess players commonly experience while calculating long endgame variations. In fact, if you’ve ever had a vivid chess dream while sleeping (quite common among my friends), you have already played blindfold chess!

Playing a chess game blindfolded (or at least facing opposite the chess board) against a class of young chess players is a sure fire way to raise the excitement level of the classroom or camp. Generally, I save such exhibitions for midway through a long camp or series of difficult lessons to add a little spice to the curriculum. In addition to adding energy to the room, a blindfold chess performance might just inspire a student to pick up the skill for his/herself which will greatly benefit their chess in the long run.

Below is my best ever such game played during the Fremont Summer Chess Camp in 2016. Enjoy…

 

[Event “Blindfold Game”]
[Site “Fremont, California (USA)”]
[Date “2016.7.13”]
[Round “”]
[White “Chris Torres”]
[Black “Intermediate Students”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C50”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C50] [ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C50]}
1.e4 {I practice what I preach: “Open With a Center Pawn.”} e5
2.Nf3 {Knights Before Bishops.} Nc6 3.Bc4 {For a blindfold game, I chose my most comfortable structure (The Italian.)}
Qe7 {Perhaps my opponents were trying to confuse me by choosing the rare Qe7 sideline.}
4.Nc3 Nd4 {
My students have already broken two opening rules. They brought their queen out
early and now they have moved the same piece twice. Normally punishing these
mistakes wouldn’t be too difficult. But playing foreign positions with no view of the board is stressful.}
( 4…Nf6 5.Ng5 d5 6.exd5 Na5 7.d6 cxd6 8.Bxf7+ Kd8 9.Bb3 Nxb3
10.axb3 d5 11.O-O h6 12.Nf3 Bg4 13.d3 a6 14.Re1 Rc8 15.Bf4 Nd7
16.h3 Bh5 17.g4 Bf7 18.Nxe5 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Qh4 20.Qf3 Bg8 21.Qxf8+
{1-0, Zhotev Jasen (BUL) 2086 – Ivanov Oleg (RUS) 2425 , Sofia 8/ 8/2009 It “Hemus Open” (3)}
) 5.Nd5 {In order to punish mistakes you must attack. Here, I know that their queen must
retreat to d8 in order to stop the knight from capturing on c7 with a fork.}
Qc5 {?!} {Honestly, I did not anticipate this move at all and was forced to repeat all the moves to myself outloud and calculate.}
6.Nxe5 {!} {“Whenever you’re aggressive, you’re at the edge of mistakes.”-Mario Andretti}
d6 {I hear excited chatter from my students about “winning a piece.”}
7.b4 {!} {Even when blindfolded, it’s hard to miss this obvious threat!}
Nxc2+ {Black had no choice that did not involve losing a piece or more.}
8.Qxc2 {I gain a knight without losing the initiative.} Qd4 {The queen may look threatening, but, really, she is all alone against an army.}
9.Bb5+ {At this point I couldn’t quite see the forced mate in 4 but this check seemed very promising.}
c6 10.Bxc6+ {!} {Looks impressive but really it is just the result of analyzing checks, captures and threats.}
bxc6 11.Qxc6+ {Forcing black’s king to d8 and a nice finish.}
Kd8 12.Nxf7# 1-0

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An Eggs-tra Special Easter Chess Lesson

April 21, 2019

happyeasterchess

In today’s chess lesson, we examine GM Julio Becerra Rivero’s egg-citing victory over IM Justin Sarkar played on Easter Sunday, 2009.

[Event “Foxwoods Open”]
[Site “Mashantucket, CT”]
[Date “2009.4.12”]
[Round “9”]
[White “Justin Sarkar”]
[Black “Julio Becerra Rivero”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “D17”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ QUEEN’S gam. SLAV def.,D17]}

1.d4 d5

2.c4 c6 {The Queen Gambit Declined, Slav.}

3.Nf3 Nf6

4.Nc3 dxc4

5.a4 {White interferes with black’s plan to play pawn to b5.}

Easter1

Position after 5. a4

5… Bf5 {The Czech Defence line of the Slav.}

6.Ne5

{Here white had two major choices. 6. e3 is the popular and solid Dutch
Variation. However, Sarkar chose the more egg-streme Krause Attack (6. Ne5).}

Easter2

Position after 6. Ne5

6… e6

7.f3 Bb4

8.e4 Bxe4

9.fxe4 Nxe4

10.Qf3 {?}

{10. Qf3 move is overly ambitious. Better is 10. Bd2.}
( 10.Bd2 Qxd4 11.Nxe4 Qxe4+ 12.Qe2 Bxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Qd5+ 14.Kc3
O-O 15.Qe3 b5 16.Be2 Nd7 17.Nxd7 Qxd7 18.Rhd1 Qe7 19.Kc2 a5 20.Bf3
Rac8 21.Qe5 g6 22.axb5 cxb5 23.Qxb5 Rc5 24.Qd7 Qg5 25.Qd4 Rfc8
26.Ra3 Rb5 27.Rd2 Rb4 28.Kd1 Rcb8 29.Ke2 Qb5 {…1-0, Bacrot Etienne (FRA) 2716 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2800 , Nanjing 10/23/2010 It “Pearl Spring” (cat.21)})

Easter3

Position after 10. Qf3

10… Qxd4

11.Qxf7+ Kd8 {What an egg-citing position!}

Easter4

Position after 11… Kd8

12.Qxg7 {??} {For peeps sake!}
( 12.Bg5+ Nxg5 ( 12…Kc8 13.Qxe6+ Nd7 14.Qxd7+ Qxd7 15.Nxd7
Nxc3 16.bxc3 Bxc3+ 17.Kd1 Bxa1 18.Nc5 b6 19.Ne6 b5 20.Be2 Be5
21.Re1 {-0.15 CAP} ) 13.Qxg7 Bxc3+ 14.bxc3 Qxc3+ 15.Ke2 Qc2+
16.Ke1 Qc3+ {1/2-1/2, Ftacnik Lubomir (SVK) 2608 – Khalifman Alexander (RUS) 2667 , Istanbul 2000 Olympiad})

Bxc3+ {!} {Punishing white’s mistake is easy like Sunday Morning}

13.bxc3 Qf2+ {White resigns.}
0-1

 

#Chess Game Worth Sharing 

July 1, 2017

Here is the game which the position from last night’s puzzle originated from. All in all, a fine miniature against the Philidor Defense, Hanham Variation (C41 – Philidor, Hanham variation: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7.)

Position after 10… Bg7.


[Event “Blitz”]

[Site “SocialChess”]

[Date “2017.06.29”]

[White “Chris Torres”]

[Black “Miranda36_2001 (1567)”]

[Result “1-0”]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nd7 4.dxe5 dxe5 5.Bc4 h6 6.Nc3 c6 7.O-O Ngf6 8.Qe2 g6 9.Rd1 Qc7 10.Be3 Bg7 11.Bxf7+ Kxf7 12.Qc4+ Ke8 13.Nb5 Qb8 14.Nd6+ Ke7 15.Bc5 b6 16.Nxe5 bxc5 17.Nxc6+

1-0

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 19

February 23, 2017

White to play and mate in three moves.

Mate in 3. (Reinle – Lange, Murnau 1936)

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nd4

June 12, 2010

Below is the infamous Blackburne Shilling Gambit.  The name of this variation in the Italian Game is utter nonsense do to the fact that Blackburne never played this line and it is not a gambit because white cannot take the pawn on e5 without losing material. Despite the terrible nomenclature, every student of chess should know this game.

 
[Site “Cologne”]
[Date “1912”]
[White “Muhlock”]
[Black “Kostics”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Italian Game”]
[Variation “Blackburne Shilling Gambit]
[PlyCount “14”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nd4 {This is the
Blackburne Shilling Gambit.} 4. Nxe5? {This mistake is what black is
hoping for. Better would be 4.0-0, 4.Nxd4, 4.c3 or even 4.d3. A rare line
is 4.0-0 b5 5.Bxf7+! White has an easy advantage with 4.c3 Nxc3 5. Qxc3 or
4.c3 Nc6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4. If white plays 4.Nxd4 exd4 5.c3 d5 6.exd5 Qe7+ 7.Kf1 he is also winning. It seems an injustice was done to Blackburne by naming 3…Nd4 after him.} Qg5 5. Nxf7?? {White needed to play 5.Bxf7+}
Qxg2 6. Rf1 Qxe4+ 7. Be2? {White chooses the quickest poison.} Nf3# 0-1

The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!

May 8, 2009

This fantastic game from 1880 is perhaps the most violent chess game ever played.

[Event "Jerome Gambit"]
[Site "England"]
[Date "1880.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "Joseph Henry Blackburne"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "28"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.Bxf7+
Kxf7 5.Nxe5+ Nxe5 6.Qh5+
{Note - d4 also regains a piece and deserves attention}
 g6 7.Qxe5 d6 8.Qxh8
Qh4 9.O-O Nf6 10.c3{Note - This is too slow as it does not stop Ng4.
 White should have tried Qd8
pinning the knight on f6.} Ng4 11.h3 Bxf2+ 12.Kh1 Bf5 13.Qxa8 Qxh3+
14.gxh3 Bxe4# 0-1

notes by Chris Torres

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