Posts Tagged ‘chess’

Chess coach Jay Stallings celebrates 25 years of teaching – Santa Clarita Valley Signal

September 21, 2019

“I think it’s less about chess and more about teaching my students how to be thinkers and good members of the community,” Stallings said. “It’s incredible for me to look around here to see former students of mine who have grey in their beards, and it’s nice to see the impact that I’ve made these past 25 years.”
— Read on signalscv.com/2019/09/chess-coach-jay-stallings-celebrates-25-years-of-teaching/

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So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 30

September 19, 2019

Black to move and win!

Black to move and win!

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 110

September 18, 2019

A remarkable position occurred after white played 47. Qxg3 in the game Samuel Sevian vs. Sergey Karjakin, FIDE World Cup 2019. Karjakin has only three legal responses as black and each would directly result in a different outcome (a win, a loss or a draw.)

Black to move and win, lose or draw! (Samuel Sevian – Sergey Karjakin, World Cup, Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, 2019.09.10.)

Artificial Stupidity: One Google Engineer’s Algorithms for Bad Chess Playing – The New Stack

September 15, 2019

Murphy has the brainpower to pull it off. He tells us that in 2007 he defended his computer science Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon — which was the same year the students began holding the annual SIGBOVIK conference on April Fool’s Day. Sponsored by the “Association for Computational Heresy,” it was a kind of satirical special interest group devoted to a fictitious researcher named “Harry Quizmaster Bovik,” and including a call for goofy papers on topics like “artificial stupidity.”
— Read on thenewstack.io/artificial-stupidity-one-google-engineers-algorithms-for-bad-chess-playing/

UCLA football hopes chess will help to checkmate opponents – Los Angeles Times

September 9, 2019

UCLA football hopes chess will help to checkmate opponents – Los Angeles Times

“Everyone is super physically gifted,” Makowsky told the news service, “but what begins to separate the elite top performers is how they process things, their mind-set, their mentality, how they can recognize patterns, how they can almost see five moves ahead.”

Makowsky, who has worked with Houston Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson and several Olympians, said what’s important is not the chess but how it applies to the principles of whatever sport the athletes play.

— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.latimes.com/sports/ucla/story/2019-08-19/ucla-football-fondness-chess-against-ncaa-competition?_amp=true

Dorian vs Fish: Hurricane on the Chessboard

September 3, 2019

img_9074

Hurricanes are one of my favorite metaphors to use while teaching chess. These massive storms arise from well known openings and thus have a predictable path for a certain amount of time. However, the path of certainty slowly gives way to uncertainty where even master meteorologists armed with powerful computers make errors in their evaluations. As with chess, the hurricane’s endgame is usually predictable based on a smaller number of variables and experience referencing similar circumstances.

Below I present a chess game analyzed as a storm. I hope you enjoy today’s lesson and consider donating to the Red Cross for hurricane relief.

[Event “Bundesliga 2012/13”]
[Site “Emsdetten GER”]
[Date “2012.12.09”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Dorian Rogozenco”]
[Black “Gennadij Lvovich Fish”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “2475”]
[ECO “E20”]
[Opening “Nimzo-Indian”]
[Variation “Romanishin, 4…c5 5.Nf3 Ne4”]
[WhiteElo “2503”]

1. d4 Nf6

2. c4 e6

3. Nc3 Bb4

4. Nf3 c5

5. g3 Ne4

6. Qc2 Qa5 

Dorian1

6… Qa5: Fish swarms early on c3.

7. Bg2 Nxc3

8. O-O cxd4

9. Nxd4 Nc6

10. bxc3 Bxc3

11. Nb3 Nd4

Dorian2

11. Nb3: Dorian becomes organized and then starts disrupting Fish’s movement.

12. Nxd4 Bxd4

13. Rb1 O-O

14. Rd1 Bc5

15. Rb5 Qc7

Dorian3

15. Rb5: The tide has turned as Dorian surges.

16. Bf4 e5

17. Rxc5 Qxc5

18. Rd5 Qb4

19. Bxe5 h6

20. Rd1 d5

21. Bxd5 Re8

Dorian4

21. Bxd5: This creates the perfect conditions for Dorian’s landfall.

22. Qg6 Qf8

23. Bxg7 Re6

24. Bxe6 Bxe6

25. Qxe6 1-0

Dorian5

22. Qg6: Finally, Dorian’s sheer force devastates the last shelter for fish. The endgame is predictably bad so Fish resigns

 

Full animation of Dorian’s hurricane on the chessboard:

imb_z2bldm

A Colorful Way To Play Chess On An ATmega328 | Hackaday

September 1, 2019

We’ve all seen those chess computers that consist out of a physical playing field, and a built-in computer that would indicate where you should put its pieces while inputting the position of your pieces in some way. These systems are usually found in a dusty cardboard box in a back room’s closet, as playing like this is fairly cumbersome, and a lot depends on the built-in chess computer.
— Read on hackaday.com/2019/08/24/a-colorful-way-to-play-chess-on-an-atmega328/

ChessKid To Attempt Chess World Record With GM Judit Polgar

September 1, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Palo Alto, Calif., Aug. 28, 2019—The world’s largest chess website for children will team with the greatest female chess player ever in an attempt to set an official Guinness world record for world’s largest chess tournament, the site announced today.

GM Judit Polgar, the strongest woman to ever play the game of chess, joins ChessKid in the record attempt, which will run from Sept. 1 to Oct. 5. Polgar will lead the ChessKid club that will organize the tournament.

All kids with a ChessKid account are invited to compete in the tournament and participate in the world record. To join the record-attempting tournament, go to https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club.

To set the record, ChessKid needs more than 20,000 individual children to compete in the tournament, said Mike Klein, the site’s chief chess officer.

The tournament will have two stages. The qualifying stage will begin on Sept. 1 and run through Oct. 5, and will constitute the record-setting attempt for largest chess tournament with 144 qualifiers.

There will be four last-chance “super-qualifiers” on the day of Polgar’s Global Chess Festival, which is October 12.

All kids qualifying from one of these 144 qualifiers will then play a final on October 19 at 8 a.m. Pacific time.

Any child who completes a single qualifier (all six rounds) will be counted toward the world record and will receive a special certificate from ChessKid signed by Judit Polgar. Participation in the finals is not required to count as part of the record.

As further incentive to play, ChessKid will randomly select one kid per qualifier (144 total) to receive one free year of ChessKid gold membership. Participants must play all six games of the qualifier to be eligible.

Five kids will be chosen at random to receive a signed copy of Judit Polgar’s book, How I Beat Fischer’s Record, and one lucky ChessKid will be randomly selected for a private lesson online with Polgar.

The top five finishers in the finals will also all receive a signed copy of the book, and will each get to play one blitz game against Polgar and one against Klein. The winner of the overall finals will also get one free online chess lesson with Polgar.

More prizes will be added later by local organizers and sponsors.

ChessKid will use all of its normal fair-play protection measures to ensure that games are played under the site’s guidelines.

Any child that is found to have used outside assistance or violated other policies will not be eligible for qualifying to the finals or any other prizes, and will also not have their participation count toward the record. All decisions made by ChessKid on fair-play cases are final.

By participating in the tournament, players agree they have their parent or guardian’s permission to play.

To join the world’s largest chess tournament and set the Guinness world record, join the Chesskid club at https://www.chesskid.com/register/kid/club/ckpolgar-world-record-club. Players must join the club to register for a qualifier.

About ChessKid:
ChessKid is the world’s largest website for children to learn and play. ChessKid.com is specifically designed to be a safe and fun place for kids, while providing resources for parents and coaches.

About Judit Polgar:
Judit Polgar is universally considered the strongest female chess player of all time. A chess prodigy, Polgar earned the grandmaster title at age 14. She is the only woman in the history of chess to surpass the 2700 rating threshold and to qualify for a world championship tournament. Polgar is also an accomplished author, chess coach and ambassador of the game.

Contact:

Mike Klein

Chief Chess Officer, ChessKid.com
mike@chesskid.com

Benko’s Great Sacrifice

August 29, 2019

Chess has a rich history full of stories that I share with my students to add extra colour to our lesson material. Below is the tale of Pal Benko’s incredible life’s journey and his great sacrifice which allowed Bobby Fischer to make history.

Pal Benko was born while his Hungarian parents were vacationing in Amiens, France, on July 15, 1928. After learning how to play chess from his father at the age of eight, Pal improved quickly and impressed many during a time when the horrors of war and famine came to Hungary. At the age of twenty, Pal Benko became the Hungarian National Champion and with his chess success came the opportunity to eat and travel. At the 1952 chess tournament, Pal made his attempt to escape the suffering and defect to the West. However, Pal Benko escape was unsuccessful and he was imprisoned in a concentration camp for a grueling 16 months. After Joseph Stalin’s death, Benko was offered clemency and immediately returned to competitive chess as a means to earn food. At the 1957 Reykjavik World Student Chess Championship, Benko made his second attempt at defecting to the United States and this time he was successful.

Pal Benko in 1964.

In the decades that followed, the name Pal Benko was synonymous with chess creativity both in his opening discoveries and his artful puzzles. During the height of his career he was, easily, the most successful open tournament player in the United States winning the U.S. Open Chess Championship a record 8 times! Ironically, the most famous sacrificial move in Pal Benko’s chess career didn’t destroy his adversary but rather elevated him.

In 1970 Benko placed third in the US Championship which guaranteed him a seat in the Interzonal tournament. (Interzonal chess tournaments were tournaments organized by FIDE from the 1950s to the 1990s as a qualifying stage for the World Chess Championship.) Bobby Fischer, who at the time was taking a break from tournament chess, suddenly decided that he wanted to make a serious attempt at the World Championship. However, because of his absence from the US Championship he did not qualify for the Interzonal. In order for Fischer to enter the World Championship cycle, someone else who qualified from the United States would have to give up his seat. The US Chess Federation asked Pal Benko if he would be willing to make this sacrifice for Bobby. Pal Benko realistically knew that Fischer had much better chances than he did at the Interzonal and thus gave up his spot for the benefit of American chess. Bobby Fischer went on to win the Interzonal, the Candidates and the 1972 World Championship Match. None of this would have been possible without Pal Benko’s Great Sacrifice.

Below is a puzzle that Pal Benko stumped Bobby Fischer with in 1968. Can you solve it?

White to move and mate in 3! (Puzzle by Pal Benko)

Pal Benko, Who Stepped Aside for Bobby Fischer, Dies at 91

August 27, 2019

Pal Benko, Who Stepped Aside for Bobby Fischer, Dies at 91

Pal Benko, a chess grandmaster who was among the world’s best players for two decades, but who gave up his place in the 1969-72 world championship cycle to Bobby Fischer, paving the way for Mr. Fischer to become world champion, died on Monday in Budapest. He was 91.

— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2019/08/26/sports/pal-benko-dead.amp.html


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