Posts Tagged ‘chess’

Fremont Chess Quads this Saturday (1/19/19)

January 17, 2019

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Rated Scholastic Chess Tournament

Saturday, January 19th 2019

11:00 am – 3:00 pm

@ Learning Bee Learning Center in Fremont

$25 entry fee

Trophies are awarded to top player in each quad. All other players will receive pins for participating.

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USCF Rated QUAD Format: All players must be USCF members. All players must understand USCF tournament rules. USCF Membership fee is $17, per year. QUAD Format – The players in each quad play a round robin, one game against each of the players in their section, for a total of three games each. Quads are by grade and experience. All quads will be Game in 30 min (each player). Sets and boards provided. Clocks will be provided, but players are encouraged to bring their own.

 

Register online: http://www.fremontchess.com/upcoming-events/

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A Friendly Rivalry: Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate

January 13, 2019
week3eight

Relaxed and highly personable, Schiller bantered amiably with the audience while presenting three of his games against Emory Tate.

 

There’s an ancient Hebrew proverb that goes something like, “The Rivalry of scholars advances wisdom.” And such was the case of the rivalry between Eric Schiller and Emory Tate. So it was a very special occasion at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp when when Eric Schiller did a two-hour lesson on his three games against Emory Tate while Tate was in the room to interject his opinions. To this day, I still receive “thank you’s” from the young chess players in the room who greatly benefited from the wisdom of these two masters.

 

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Emory Tate inspiring the next generation at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

Below is part 2 of the trilogy of chess battles between Eric Schiller (March 20, 1955 – November 3, 2018) and Emory Tate (December 27, 1958 – October 17, 2015) with notes by Schiller.

[Event "Western States Open"]
[Site "Reno, Nevada (USA)"]
[Date "2004.10.16"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Emory Tate"]
[Black "Eric Schiller"]


1.e4 {Notes by Eric Schiller.} 
1... e5 
2.Nf3 Nc6 
3.Bb5 Nge7 
4.O-O a6 
5.Ba4 b5 
6.Bb3 Ng6 
7.c3 Be7 
8.d4 O-O 
9.a4 {A new move in this rarely explored opening. It caught me off-guard and I did
not react properly.} Bb7 {?! 9...b4 was surely the correct
plan. 9...Rb8 looks dubious because of 10.axb5 axb5 11.d5 +- }

ts1

Position after 9. a4

10.d5 Nb8 { This retreat is not justified. I simply was afraid
of the plan of maneuvering my knight to c4, because I feared
that after a capture by the bishop, and recapture with my
d-pawn, that the pawn at c4 would then be a serious
weakness. 10...Na5 11.Ba2 c5 12.b4 Nc4 13.Bxc4 bxc4 14.bxc5
Bxc5 15.Na3 +0.27 would not be so bad for Black. } 

ts2

Position after 10… Nb8

11.Qe2 bxa4 { I was thinking along the lines of my game with Nicholas
Yap. that's what happens when you win a nice game, it carries
over and the next time you use the opening you tend to play
the same way, whether or not it is appropriate.} 

ts3

Position after 11… Bxa4

12.Rxa4 d6

13.Be3 {+/= No doubt about it, White has a small advantage
here. Nevertheless, Black can whip up some serious counter
play.} 

ts4

Position after 13. Be3

13... Bc8 {?! This bishop is destined to stagger drunkenly
all over the board, without having any serious effect on
White's position. 13...Nd7 would've been a much better plan
and in that case White's advantage would not have been so
significant. } 

ts5

Position after 13… Bc8

14.Nbd2 Bd7 

15.Ra3 f5 {At this point there
really isn't any other source of counterplay.} 

ts6

Position after 15… f5



16.exf5 Bxf5
17.Bc4 Bg4 
18.h3 Bc8 
19.Ne4 h6 
20.b4 {! +/- White has a dominating position and Black is suffering under the weight of
a large number weaknesses.} 

ts7

Position after 20. b4


20... Qe8 
21.Nc5 {! A powerful move! The sacrifice cannot be accepted.} 

ts8

Position after 21. Nc5


21... Bd8 { 21...dxc5 ? 22.d6+ Kh8 23.dxe7 Nxe7 24.Bxc5 is a miserable 
for Black. } 

ts10

Position after 21… Bd8

22.Ne6 Rf6

23.Nd2 Bxe6 {!? Of course that this is not the best move,
objectively. I made the capture simply because it allowed me
to develop a plan to win White's new weakling at e6, and
possibly get some counter play going by advancing central
pawns. Other moves would have left me with a miserable
position with no real chances to establish any sort of counter
play.} 

ts11

Position after 23… Bxe6

24.dxe6 Ne7 { All I have to do is somehow advance my
pawn from d6 to d5 and everything will be fine. Unfortunately
my opponent doesn't allow me to do that..}

ts12

Position after 24… Ne7

 

25.Ne4 {!} Rf8

26.Ba2 {By the way, did I underestimate this move. At the very
end of the game you will see the point.} 

ts13

Position after 26. Ba2

26... Qg6 

27.Bc1 Kh8 

28.b5 a5 

29.f4 {!} d5 { Finally! At this point, however, the move
doesn't have much of an impact and allows the knight to take
up an even better post at c5.} 

ts14

Position after 29… d5

30.Nc5 c6 

31.Qxe5 Bb6 

32.Be3 Nf5 {? Right square, wrong piece. I could have kept the game
close by moving my rook to the square. 32...Rf5 ! 33.Qd4 Bxc5
34.Qxc5 Qxe6 35.bxc6 Nbxc6 +/= } 

ts15

Position after 32… Nf5

33.Bf2 {? A serious error which allows me to get back into the game, 
but both of us mis-analyzed the position and missed the finesse at the
end. 33.Bd4 ! Nxd4 34.cxd4 cxb5 35.Bxd5 Bxc5 36.dxc5 Ra7 37.f5
was the correct plan. White's passed pawns and dominating
bishop provide a winning advantage. } 

ts16

Position after 33. Bf2

33... Re8 {? 33...Nh4 ! was the saving plan. I spotted the move, of course, 
but simply didn't date indeed enough into the position. Both players 
saw the same continuation [34.Bxd5 ! cxd5 35.Qxd5 Ra7 ! 36.Bxh4 (but here 
we both failed to spot Rf5 !) 37.Qe4 Bxc5+ 38.Bf2 Qf6 
[38...Bxa3 39.Bxa7 ] 39.Bxc5 Rxc5 40.Rxa5 Rxa5 41.e7 Rc8
42.e8=Q+ Rxe8 43.Qxe8+ Kh7 44.Qxb8 Qxc3 with a difficult but
not hopeless position for Black. } 

ts17

Position after 33… Re8

34.Bb1 {! +- The bishop slips onto the long diagonal and finishes 
off the game.} 

ts18

Position after 34. Bb1

34... Bxc5

35.Bxc5 Nd7 {I allow Emory Tate to finish the game with a
flashy tactic. Why not? He played very well.} 

ts19

Position after 35… Nd7

36.exd7 Rxe5

37.fxe5 {I resigned. My opponent at long last got his revenge
for my upset victory in the 1997 United States Masters.} 1-0

ts20

Position after 37. fxe5

 

Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate Game 1

 

Remembering Eric Schiller (1955-2018)

January 1, 2019

 

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In 2018 I lost a good friend and excellent coach, Eric Schiller. Eric was a true gentleman and scholar who during his journey through life acquired a PhD in Linguistics and FIDE Master title in chess. Most will probably remember Eric as the most prolific chess author in history (he wrote over 100 chess books) or for being the arbiter for the 2000 FIDE World Chess Championships. I will always remember Eric for the way he inspired scores of  chess students at our chess camps and classes.

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Some of Eric Schiller’s books on display at a chess camp.

 

Below is a game between Eric Schiller and Emory Tate (another friend who has since passed.) Eric and Emory showed this game to a packed house in our Fremont Chess Camp at MSJE. All notes are Eric’s. Enjoy…

 

[Event "US Masters"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "1997.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Emory Tate"]
[Black "Eric Schiller"]
[ECO "C41"]


1.e4 e52.Nf3 d63.d4 exd44.Qxd4 a6

Tate-Schiller1

Position after 4… a6

5.Bg5 Nf66.Nc3 Be77.O-O-O Nc68.Qd2 Be69.Kb1 O-O
Tate-Schiller2

Position after 9… 0-0

10.Qe1 Nd7
11.h4 Bf612.Be2 Re813.Nd2 {! ?}13... b5 { 13...Bxg5 14.hxg5 Qxg5 15.g3 scared me a bit. }
Tate-Schiller3

Position after 13… b5

14.f4 b415.Na4 Nd4 {!}16.g4 c5

Tate-Schiller4

Position after 16… c5

17.b3 { 17.Rh2 Nxe2 18.Qxe2 h6 19.Rdh1 ! ? } 
17... Bd518.Qf1 Bc6 {18...Rxe4 19.Nxe4 Bxe4 Black is clearly better. }
Tate-Schiller5

Position after 18… Bc6

19.Nc4 {? Way too ambitious.} 
19... Bxe420.Bd3 Bxh121.Qxh1 Nb5 
22.Bf5 Nf8
23.Ncb6 h6 {? ! 23...Ra7 24.Nd5 Bxg5 25.hxg5 Nd4 }
Tate-Schiller6

Position after 23… h6

24.Nxa8 Na3+25.Kc1 hxg526.N8b6 {? ! 26.fxg5 ! Be5 27.N8b6 Bf4+ 28.Kb2 g6 29.Bd3 Be5+ } 
26... gxf4 {!}
Tate-Schiller7

Position after 26… gxf4

27.Nd5 Bd428.Bd3 f329.g5 {29.Qxf3 Qxh4 } 
29... f2
Tate-Schiller8

Position after 29… f2

30.Qf1 Re531.Nf4 {? 31.c3 was needed. }
31... Be3+

Tate-Schiller9

Position after 31… Be3+

32.Kb2 Bxf433.Qxf2 Be334.Qf3 Qe735.Nb6 Rxg5
Tate-Schiller10

Position after 35… Rxg5

36.c3 Re5
37.Nc8 Qxh438.Rc1 bxc3+ {? 38...Bxc1+ 39.Ka1 Bb2+ ! 40.Kxb2
bxc3+ 41.Kxc3 Qd4+ 42.Kd2 Qb4+ 43.Kc1 Qc3+ 44.Kd1 Qe1# }
Tate-Schiller11

Position after 38… bxc3+

39.Ka1 Bf440.Bb1 {White resigned.} 0-1

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 109

December 30, 2018

White to move and mate in 6. (Gad RechlisSergei Lobanov, FIDE World Rapid Championship, St Petersburg, 12/28/2018)

White to move and mate in 6. (Gad Rechlis – Sergei Lobanov, FIDE World Rapid Championship, St Petersburg, 12/28/2018)

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 108

December 29, 2018

GM Dmitry Andreiken plays the most beautiful game ending combination of 2018 right before the new year starts! Can you spot black’s brilliant continuation?

Black to move and mate in 6! (GM Peter SvidlerGM Dmitry Andreikin, FIDE World Rapid Championship, St Petersburg, 12/27/2018)

Black to move and mate in 6! (GM Peter Svidler – GM Dmitry Andreikin, FIDE World Rapid Championship, St Petersburg, 12/27/2018)

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 107

December 22, 2018

White to move and win (Aron Nimzowitsch, My System 1925.)

White to move and win (Aron Nimzowitsch, My System 1925.)

Possibly the Coolest Chess Camp Ever!

December 19, 2018

The Fremont Winter Chess Camp Returns

December 26-28 and January 2-4

12:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Only $150 for one three day camp!

Each camp will feature:

*One full day of top-secret opening traps and zaps!

*One full day devoted to the most important middle game strategies and tactics.

*One full day exploring the most important endgame themes.

*A complete rated tournament with prizes.

Plus

*A free 1-1 follow up lesson with Chris Torres. ($80 value)

*A complimentary copy of GM Susan Polgar s Learn Chess the Right Way! ($20 value)

Located at

Learning Bee Learning Center

39977 Mission Blvd.

Fremont, CA 94539

REGISTER HERE

If you have any questions please contact Chris Torres

(209)323-0197

Chesslessons@aol.com

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 106

December 17, 2018

Hikaru Nakamura just defeated Maxime Vachier-Lagrave to win the London Chess Classic. Can you spot Nakamura’s final move? White to move and win.

Nakamura – MVL, 2018 London Chess Classic. White to move and win.

‘Tis the Season for Chess in Fremont

December 12, 2018

FREMONT, CALIFORNIA – 12/12/2018 (PrDistribution.com)

It’s the Most Wonderful time of the year for young chess players in Fremont, California. FremontChess.com has announced their winter schedule and it’s chock full of rated tournaments, holiday chess camps and fun chess classes that are sure to inspire all who attend.

The winter program kicks off on December 15th with the FremontChess.com Chess Quads. This round robin tournament is a great choice for young chess players because the format is non-elimination and all the participants are broken into groups of four (a quad) to ensure players of the same skill level are paired against each other. For only $25 ($20/quad if you sign up for 3), children will play three rated games, receive 1-on-1 instruction with professional coaches and be awarded a prize at the end of the tournament.

The FremontChess.com Winter Chess Camp is a special chess program designed and taught by nationally renowned chess instructor Chris Torres.  Due to the popularity of this camp, this year Chris Torres will be offering two unique three day chess camps each with a full day’s focus on opening, middle game and endgames. The FremontChess.com Winter Chess Camp will meet December 26-28th from 12:00 pm until 4:00 pm and then again January 2-4th from 12:00 pm until 4:00 pm. Both camps will have their own unique lessons and tournaments so students can attend both programs without any repeating material. The tuition for each camp is $150 and a child can both session for $250. All children who attend at least three days will receive an award and a certificate on their final day of camp.

The longest running Saturday chess class in Fremont reconvenes on January 5th. The FremontChess.com Chess Team is a very special chess program designed and taught by twenty-year professional chess coach Chris Torres. This class will provide experienced tournament players with instruction that will quickly increase their ability and understanding of chess. Participants will begin their afternoon by participating in an hour long chess class taught by Chris Torres. Students will then play 1 USCF rated chess game as part of the ongoing tournament and receive analysis of their play. The FremontChess.com Chess Team will meet every Saturday from 11:00 am until 1:00 pm and tuition for this class is only $180 for 10 classes.

Signing up for all of these events is easy at www.FremontChess.com. While you’re there, be sure to take advantage of the 100’s of free lessons and chess puzzles on FremontChess.com this Holiday Season. Finally, check out our online chess store for special deals on the perfect chess stocking stuffers.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Chris Torres

1-209-323-0197

www.FremontChess.com

chesslessons@aol.com

Source: https://www.prdistribution.com/news/tis-the-season-for-chess-in-fremont/3880199#

Learning Chess The “Right Way” Has Never Been Easier!

December 8, 2018

I am in a unique situation as a chess coach due to my proximity to Silicon Valley. The average parents of my chess students are highly skilled professionals, including Ph.D.s and college professors, doctors, attorneys, physicists , CEOs, and of course computer engineers. These parents tend to be very involved in their child’s chess development and expect the best curricula and training methodology from their coaches. This is why, I always rely heavily on Susan Polgar’s, “Learn Chess the Right Way” book series. In over two decades as a professional chess coach, I have never seen a better system for helping young players achieve rapid chess improvement than what Susan presents with this program. Since their release, these books have played a huge role in my successes as a chess coach.

Live in the Bay Area or surrounding areas? Send me an email (chesslessons@aol.com) and I will be happy to supply you with your own copies of this important book series.


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