Posts Tagged ‘computer chess’

Open Source Chess Engine Reigns Supreme

June 22, 2014

The free and open source chess engine, Stockfish, is now ranked number 1 on the Computer Chess Ratings List. Stockfish is also the Grand Champion of season six’s Thoresen Chess Engine Championship. Congratulations to the Stockfish Team and the open source movement.

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Rybka Proves It Is Still The Best

October 5, 2008
Congratulations to Rybka's creator, IM Vasik Rajlich, for raising the bar on the competition.

Rybka's creator, IM Vasik Rajlich

Rybka finished first in the 16th ICGA World Computer Chess Championship held in Beijing, China with a score of 8/9 with no losses. For much of the tournament Hiarcs was keeping pace with Rybka but when the two engines played, Rybka was victorious. The other key game for Rybka was against  Junior (2006 World Computer Chess Champion.) In this game Rybka seems to be aiming for a Kan or Taimanov Sicilian with the early a6 move. Junior responds with an early c3 and the game quickly becomes of interest to all players who enjoy the Kan, Paulsen, or Taimanov Sicilians.  Below is a list of all the past champions, followed by the 2008 results and the Junior vs. Rybka game. For more information on the World Computer Chess Championships please visit http://www.cs.unimaas.nl/icga/ and http://www.grappa.univ-lille3.fr/icga/event.php?id=37

   History of the World Computer Chess Championship

Event # Year Location Winner
1 1974 Stockholm Kaissa
2 1977 Toronto Chess 4.6
3 1980 Linz Belle
4 1983 New York, NY Cray Blitz
5 1986 Cologne Cray Blitz
6 1989 Edmonton, Canada Deep Thought
7 1992 Madrid, Spain ChessMachine (Gideon)
8 1995 Hong Kong Fritz
9 1999 Paderborn, Germany Shredder
10 2002 Maastricht, Netherlands Deep Junior
11 2003 Graz, Austria Shredder
12 2004 Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel Deep Junior
13 2005 Reykjavík, Iceland Zappa
14 2006 Torino, Italy Junior
15 2007 Amsterdam, The Netherlands Rybka
16 2008 Beijing, China Rybka

 

Results of the 2008 World Computer Chess Championship

Rank Program Origin Hardware Score Games SOS SoDOS
1 Rybka flag USA Cluster, 40 cores 8.0 9 37.0 31.25
2 Hiarcs flag GBR Intel Skulltrail, 8 x 4Ghz 7.0 9 38.0 26.00
3 Junior flag ISR Intel Dunnington, 12 x 2.67Ghz 6.0 9 39.0 22.00
4 Cluster Toga flag DEU Cluster, 24 cores 5.5 9 39.5 19.75
5 Shredder flag DEU Intel Core 2, 8 x 3.16Ghz 4.5 9 40.5 14.75
6 Falcon flag ISR Intel Core 2, 2 x 2.1Ghz 4.0 9 41.0 13.00
7 Jonny flag DEU Cluster, 16 cores 4.0 9 41.0 10.25
8 Sjeng flag BEL Intel Core 2, 4 x 2.8Ghz 3.5 9 41.5 10.50
9 The Baron flag NLD AMD Opteron 270, 4 x 2Ghz 2.5 9 42.5 7.50
10 Mobile Chess flag CHN Nokia 6120c 0.0 9 45.0 0.00
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1
0
1 Rybka   1 = = 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 Hiarcs 0   1 = 1 1 1 1 = 1
3 Junior = 0   1 = = 1 = 1 1
4 Cluster Toga = = 0   = 0 1 1 1 1
5 Shredder 0 0 = =   1 = = = 1
6 Falcon 0 0 = 1 0   = 0 1 1
7 Jonny 0 0 0 0 = =   1 1 1
8 Sjeng 0 0 = 0 = 1 0   = 1
9 The Baron 0 = 0 0 = 0 0 =   1
10 Mobile Chess 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[Site “Beijing, China”]
[Date “2008.10.04”]
[Round “10”]
[White “Junior”]
[Black “Rybka”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 a6 3. c3 e6 4. d4 d5 5. e5 Bd7 6. dxc5 Bxc5 7. Bd3 Qc7 8. O-O
Ne7 9. Re1 Ng6 10. Nbd2 Qb6 11. Nd4 Nc6 12. N2b3 Ngxe5 13. Nxc5 Qxc5 14. Bf4
Nxd3 15. Qxd3 O-O 16. Qg3 Nxd4 17. Bd6 Qb6 18. cxd4 Rfc8 19. Be5 g6 20. Qf4 Qd8
21. Re3 Rc2 22. Rh3 f5 23. Rg3 Be8 24. h4 Qe7 25. Rc1 Rac8 26. Rxc2 Rxc2 27. h5
Bf7 28. a3 b5 29. Bd6 Qd8 30. h6 Qf6 31. Bc5 Be8 32. Qb8 Kf7 33. Qd6 Rc1+ 34.
Kh2 Kg8 35. Re3 Qh4+ 36. Rh3 Qf6 37. b4 Re1 38. f4 Re4 39. Qb6 g5 40. fxg5 Qf7
41. Kg1 Rg4 42. Qd8 f4 43. Rf3 Qg6 44. Be7 Qb1+ 45. Rf1 Rxg2+ 46. Kxg2 Qe4+ 47.
Kg1 Qe3+ 48. Rf2 Qg3+ 49. Kf1 Qh3+ 50. Ke2 Qe3+ 51. Kd1 Qd3+ 52. Rd2 Qb1+ 53.
Ke2 Qe4+ 54. Kf1 Qf3+ 55. Ke1 Qh1+ 56. Kf2 Qh2+ 57. Kf3 Qg3+ 58. Ke2 Qe3+ 59.
Kd1 Qb3+ 60. Rc2 Qd3+ 61. Kc1 Qxa3+ 62. Kb1 Qb3+ 1/2-1/2

World Computer Chess Championships 2008

October 3, 2008

Kasparov vs. Deep Blue

   On 9/28/2008 the 16’th World Computer Chess Championships began in Beijing, China. The IGCA has scheduled an eleven round accelerated swiss tournament format for the top  chess engines in the world to compete for the the title of World Computer Chess Champion 2008. The accelerated swiss structure strikes me as odd being that there are only ten competing chess programs.  The principle of a Swiss tournament is that each player will be pitted against another player who has done as well (or as poorly) as him or herself. The first round is seeded according to rating. Players who win receive a point, those who draw receive half a point and losers receive no points. Win, lose, or draw, all players proceed to the next round where winners are pitted against winners, losers are pitted against losers, and so on. In subsequent rounds, players face opponents with the same (or almost the same) score. No player is paired up against the same opponent twice however. This is where the organizers of the 16’th World Computer Chess Championships are going to run into trouble. With only ten competitors and eleven rounds, it will be impossible to follow a swiss format. The schedule of the chess events have been taken off the the IGCA website and I expect them to alter the pairings and tournament schedule. Obviously this should have been done before the tournament started.

   My criticism of the tournament structure aside, this event should, once again, demonstrate that computers are now playing much better chess than humans ever will. Case and point: When Viswanathan Anand faces off against Vladimir Kramnik in eleven days, it will be computer chess engines that will provide humans with the most definative analysis as to who won the championship and why. I doubt we will see any humans evaluating Rybka’s games with out the help of a chess engine.

   Speaking of Rybka… After five rounds the reigning 2007 champion is tied with Hiarcs at 4.5/5. The two leading engines have yet to play each other. Below is the cross-table and a nice game played by Rybka.

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1
0
1 Rybka       =   1 1 1 1  
2 Hiarcs       = 1     1 1 1
3 Junior       1   =   1 = 1
4 Cluster Toga = = 0     = 1      
5 Sjeng   0         = 0 1 1
6 Shredder 0   = =     = =    
7 The Baron 0     0 = =       1
8 Jonny 0 0 0   1 =        
9 Falcon 0 0 =   0         1
10 Mobile Chess   0 0   0   0   0  
    = = = = = = = = = =

 

[Event “16th World Computer Chess Championship”]
[Site “Beijing, China”]
[Date “2008.09.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Rybka”]
[Black “The Baron”]
[Result “1-0”]

1. e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nc4 Nxe4 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.bxc3 g6 7.d4 Bg7 8.Bd3 o-o
9.o-o Nc6 10.Qf3 Re8 11.Bf4 Bd7 12.Ne3 Na5 13.Qg3 Bc6 14.h4 Be4 15.h5 Qd7 16.Rae1 Qc6
17.h6 Bxd3 18.cxd3 Bf6 19.c4 Bxd4 20.Nd5 Rxe1 21.Rxe1 Qc5 22.Re7 Nc6 23. Rxc7 Qa5 24.Qh4 Qxa2
25.Nf6 Kh8 26.Rxf7 Qa1 27.Kh2 Bxf6 28.Qxf6 Qxf6 29.Rxf6 Kg8 30.Rxd6 Rf8 31.Kg3 a5 32.Bc1 a4
33.f3 Rd8 34.Rxd8 Nxd8 35.Kf4 Kf7 36.d4 g5 37.Ke4 Ne6 38.Kd3 Kg6 39.d5 Nc5 40.Kc3 Kxh6
41.Be3 Nd7 42.Kb4 a3 43.Kxa3 Kg6 44.Bd4 Kf7 45.Ka4 Ke8 46.g4 Nf8 47.Ka5 Kd7 48.Kb6 Kc8
49.Kc5 Kc7 50.Be5 Kd7 51.Bf6 h6 52.Bg7 Ng6 53.Bxh6 Ne5 54.Bxg5 Nxf3 1-0

Vladimir Kramnik in Germany

September 27, 2008

   The upcoming World Championship Chess Match against Viswanathan Anand is not Vladimir Kramnik’s first chess match in Germany. In July of 2000 Kramnik played another high profile match in Deutschland. This time his opponent was the highly touted computer program Deep Junior. Because his opponent was a computer, Kramnik used anti-computer strategy that would not work against someone like Anand. This does not take anything away from Kramnik’s achievement in the game below. His play was nothing short of brilliant.
   Playing 2. e3, Kramnik is obviously playing a slightly inferior move to take the computer out of its opening book. Kramnik’s strategy is to eliminate any opening advantage the computer may have and then lock up the pawns to reduce the computer’s calculation advantage. Kramnik then will use the human advantage of being able to form a long term plan to set up a position that favors the human. Its amazing how coordinated Kramnik’s pieces become after 23. Bd1. His bishop, 2 rooks, queen and knight are all focused on Deep Junior’s king. In contrast, Deep Junior showed little understanding of what was happening when Kramnik played his 12, 15 and 18 move. Becuse of this lack of understanding the aspects of the advancing pawns in a closed position, Deep Junior’s pieces are caught in the wrong locations late in the game. After 25. e4 Kramnik unleashes his dark square bishop thus using all his pieces together in the same attack. The rest of the game Kramnik plays with the great accuracy that is needed to defeat a strong computer opponent.

 

 

[Event “SuperGM”]

[Site “Dortmund GER”]

[Date “2000.07.12”]

[EventDate “2000.07.07”]

[Round “5”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]

[Black “Junior (Computer)”]

[ECO “D00”]

[WhiteElo “2770”]

[BlackElo “?”]

[PlyCount “65”]
1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Bd3 e6 4. f4 Be7 5. Nf3 c5 6. c3 O-O
7. Nbd2 Ng4 8. Qe2 c4 9. Bc2 f5 10. Rg1 Nc6 11. h3 Nf6 12. g4
Ne4 13. Qg2 g6 14. Qh2 Kh8 15. h4 Nxd2 16. Bxd2 fxg4 17. Ng5
Qe8 18. h5 gxh5 19. Rxg4 Rf6 20. Rh4 Rh6 21. O-O-O a5 22. Rh1
b5 23. Bd1 Ra7 24. Bxh5 Qf8 25. e4 Bd8 26. f5 b4 27. Bg6 Rxh4
28. Qxh4 bxc3 29. bxc3 Bf6 30. Qxh7+ Rxh7 31. Rxh7+ Kg8
32. Bf7+ Qxf7 33. Rxf7 1-0


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