Posts Tagged ‘Emory Tate’

A Friendly Rivalry: Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate

January 13, 2019
week3eight

Relaxed and highly personable, Schiller bantered amiably with the audience while presenting three of his games against Emory Tate.

 

There’s an ancient Hebrew proverb that goes something like, “The Rivalry of scholars advances wisdom.” And such was the case of the rivalry between Eric Schiller and Emory Tate. So it was a very special occasion at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp when when Eric Schiller did a two-hour lesson on his three games against Emory Tate while Tate was in the room to interject his opinions. To this day, I still receive “thank you’s” from the young chess players in the room who greatly benefited from the wisdom of these two masters.

 

img_6477

Emory Tate inspiring the next generation at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

Below is part 2 of the trilogy of chess battles between Eric Schiller (March 20, 1955 – November 3, 2018) and Emory Tate (December 27, 1958 – October 17, 2015) with notes by Schiller.

[Event "Western States Open"]
[Site "Reno, Nevada (USA)"]
[Date "2004.10.16"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Emory Tate"]
[Black "Eric Schiller"]


1.e4 {Notes by Eric Schiller.} 
1... e5 
2.Nf3 Nc6 
3.Bb5 Nge7 
4.O-O a6 
5.Ba4 b5 
6.Bb3 Ng6 
7.c3 Be7 
8.d4 O-O 
9.a4 {A new move in this rarely explored opening. It caught me off-guard and I did
not react properly.} Bb7 {?! 9...b4 was surely the correct
plan. 9...Rb8 looks dubious because of 10.axb5 axb5 11.d5 +- }

ts1

Position after 9. a4

10.d5 Nb8 { This retreat is not justified. I simply was afraid
of the plan of maneuvering my knight to c4, because I feared
that after a capture by the bishop, and recapture with my
d-pawn, that the pawn at c4 would then be a serious
weakness. 10...Na5 11.Ba2 c5 12.b4 Nc4 13.Bxc4 bxc4 14.bxc5
Bxc5 15.Na3 +0.27 would not be so bad for Black. } 

ts2

Position after 10… Nb8

11.Qe2 bxa4 { I was thinking along the lines of my game with Nicholas
Yap. that's what happens when you win a nice game, it carries
over and the next time you use the opening you tend to play
the same way, whether or not it is appropriate.} 

ts3

Position after 11… Bxa4

12.Rxa4 d6

13.Be3 {+/= No doubt about it, White has a small advantage
here. Nevertheless, Black can whip up some serious counter
play.} 

ts4

Position after 13. Be3

13... Bc8 {?! This bishop is destined to stagger drunkenly
all over the board, without having any serious effect on
White's position. 13...Nd7 would've been a much better plan
and in that case White's advantage would not have been so
significant. } 

ts5

Position after 13… Bc8

14.Nbd2 Bd7 

15.Ra3 f5 {At this point there
really isn't any other source of counterplay.} 

ts6

Position after 15… f5



16.exf5 Bxf5
17.Bc4 Bg4 
18.h3 Bc8 
19.Ne4 h6 
20.b4 {! +/- White has a dominating position and Black is suffering under the weight of
a large number weaknesses.} 

ts7

Position after 20. b4


20... Qe8 
21.Nc5 {! A powerful move! The sacrifice cannot be accepted.} 

ts8

Position after 21. Nc5


21... Bd8 { 21...dxc5 ? 22.d6+ Kh8 23.dxe7 Nxe7 24.Bxc5 is a miserable 
for Black. } 

ts10

Position after 21… Bd8

22.Ne6 Rf6

23.Nd2 Bxe6 {!? Of course that this is not the best move,
objectively. I made the capture simply because it allowed me
to develop a plan to win White's new weakling at e6, and
possibly get some counter play going by advancing central
pawns. Other moves would have left me with a miserable
position with no real chances to establish any sort of counter
play.} 

ts11

Position after 23… Bxe6

24.dxe6 Ne7 { All I have to do is somehow advance my
pawn from d6 to d5 and everything will be fine. Unfortunately
my opponent doesn't allow me to do that..}

ts12

Position after 24… Ne7

 

25.Ne4 {!} Rf8

26.Ba2 {By the way, did I underestimate this move. At the very
end of the game you will see the point.} 

ts13

Position after 26. Ba2

26... Qg6 

27.Bc1 Kh8 

28.b5 a5 

29.f4 {!} d5 { Finally! At this point, however, the move
doesn't have much of an impact and allows the knight to take
up an even better post at c5.} 

ts14

Position after 29… d5

30.Nc5 c6 

31.Qxe5 Bb6 

32.Be3 Nf5 {? Right square, wrong piece. I could have kept the game
close by moving my rook to the square. 32...Rf5 ! 33.Qd4 Bxc5
34.Qxc5 Qxe6 35.bxc6 Nbxc6 +/= } 

ts15

Position after 32… Nf5

33.Bf2 {? A serious error which allows me to get back into the game, 
but both of us mis-analyzed the position and missed the finesse at the
end. 33.Bd4 ! Nxd4 34.cxd4 cxb5 35.Bxd5 Bxc5 36.dxc5 Ra7 37.f5
was the correct plan. White's passed pawns and dominating
bishop provide a winning advantage. } 

ts16

Position after 33. Bf2

33... Re8 {? 33...Nh4 ! was the saving plan. I spotted the move, of course, 
but simply didn't date indeed enough into the position. Both players 
saw the same continuation [34.Bxd5 ! cxd5 35.Qxd5 Ra7 ! 36.Bxh4 (but here 
we both failed to spot Rf5 !) 37.Qe4 Bxc5+ 38.Bf2 Qf6 
[38...Bxa3 39.Bxa7 ] 39.Bxc5 Rxc5 40.Rxa5 Rxa5 41.e7 Rc8
42.e8=Q+ Rxe8 43.Qxe8+ Kh7 44.Qxb8 Qxc3 with a difficult but
not hopeless position for Black. } 

ts17

Position after 33… Re8

34.Bb1 {! +- The bishop slips onto the long diagonal and finishes 
off the game.} 

ts18

Position after 34. Bb1

34... Bxc5

35.Bxc5 Nd7 {I allow Emory Tate to finish the game with a
flashy tactic. Why not? He played very well.} 

ts19

Position after 35… Nd7

36.exd7 Rxe5

37.fxe5 {I resigned. My opponent at long last got his revenge
for my upset victory in the 1997 United States Masters.} 1-0

ts20

Position after 37. fxe5

 

Eric Schiller VS Emory Tate Game 1

 

Remembering Eric Schiller (1955-2018)

January 1, 2019

 

week3seven

In 2018 I lost a good friend and excellent coach, Eric Schiller. Eric was a true gentleman and scholar who during his journey through life acquired a PhD in Linguistics and FIDE Master title in chess. Most will probably remember Eric as the most prolific chess author in history (he wrote over 100 chess books) or for being the arbiter for the 2000 FIDE World Chess Championships. I will always remember Eric for the way he inspired scores of  chess students at our chess camps and classes.

week3nine

Some of Eric Schiller’s books on display at a chess camp.

 

Below is a game between Eric Schiller and Emory Tate (another friend who has since passed.) Eric and Emory showed this game to a packed house in our Fremont Chess Camp at MSJE. All notes are Eric’s. Enjoy…

 

[Event "US Masters"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "1997.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Emory Tate"]
[Black "Eric Schiller"]
[ECO "C41"]


1.e4 e52.Nf3 d63.d4 exd44.Qxd4 a6

Tate-Schiller1

Position after 4… a6

5.Bg5 Nf66.Nc3 Be77.O-O-O Nc68.Qd2 Be69.Kb1 O-O
Tate-Schiller2

Position after 9… 0-0

10.Qe1 Nd7
11.h4 Bf612.Be2 Re813.Nd2 {! ?}13... b5 { 13...Bxg5 14.hxg5 Qxg5 15.g3 scared me a bit. }
Tate-Schiller3

Position after 13… b5

14.f4 b415.Na4 Nd4 {!}16.g4 c5

Tate-Schiller4

Position after 16… c5

17.b3 { 17.Rh2 Nxe2 18.Qxe2 h6 19.Rdh1 ! ? } 
17... Bd518.Qf1 Bc6 {18...Rxe4 19.Nxe4 Bxe4 Black is clearly better. }
Tate-Schiller5

Position after 18… Bc6

19.Nc4 {? Way too ambitious.} 
19... Bxe420.Bd3 Bxh121.Qxh1 Nb5 
22.Bf5 Nf8
23.Ncb6 h6 {? ! 23...Ra7 24.Nd5 Bxg5 25.hxg5 Nd4 }
Tate-Schiller6

Position after 23… h6

24.Nxa8 Na3+25.Kc1 hxg526.N8b6 {? ! 26.fxg5 ! Be5 27.N8b6 Bf4+ 28.Kb2 g6 29.Bd3 Be5+ } 
26... gxf4 {!}
Tate-Schiller7

Position after 26… gxf4

27.Nd5 Bd428.Bd3 f329.g5 {29.Qxf3 Qxh4 } 
29... f2
Tate-Schiller8

Position after 29… f2

30.Qf1 Re531.Nf4 {? 31.c3 was needed. }
31... Be3+

Tate-Schiller9

Position after 31… Be3+

32.Kb2 Bxf433.Qxf2 Be334.Qf3 Qe735.Nb6 Rxg5
Tate-Schiller10

Position after 35… Rxg5

36.c3 Re5
37.Nc8 Qxh438.Rc1 bxc3+ {? 38...Bxc1+ 39.Ka1 Bb2+ ! 40.Kxb2
bxc3+ 41.Kxc3 Qd4+ 42.Kd2 Qb4+ 43.Kc1 Qc3+ 44.Kd1 Qe1# }
Tate-Schiller11

Position after 38… bxc3+

39.Ka1 Bf440.Bb1 {White resigned.} 0-1

Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior (Special Offer)

August 10, 2017


This is a limited time offer to own or gift a hardbound copy of “Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior.” Dr. Daaim Shabazz and I know Emory had many friends in California who have not yet had an opportunity to add Triple Exclam into their library. Daaim has entrusted me to distribute some of the last remaining copies of this historic work out west. Help us keep Emory’s memory alive and well in California by ordering a copy of his book. In most cases, I will deliver your copy to you personally with a handshake. Additionally, you will be invited to an exclusive book talk the next time Dr. Daaim Shabazz is in California. The price is just $40. Please send questions and orders to Chris Torres, chesslessons@aol.com

Click here to read my review of “Triple Exclam!!! The Life And Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior”

Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior (review)

August 1, 2017

Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior

Emory Tate was more than an International Master at chess. He was an icon of African American chess, a poet, a fighter, a father, a wordsmith and an oftentimes misunderstood genius. To many in the chess world, Emory was a boastful stranger and, to a lucky few, a good friend. Emory acquired legions of fans through his brilliant chess moves. Many became fascinated by his enigmatic personality and mysterious past only to discover that it was nearly impossible to separate the myth from the man. This is where the book Triple Exclam!!! shines.

In Triple Exclam!!!, Daaim Shabazz aptly exposes the real Emory Tate by focusing not just on the light and dark, but also everything in between. Through sheer determination, Shabazz does what so many other chess players failed to, he captures the genius that was Emory Tate. In doing so, Triple Exclam!!! makes a solid case that: Emory Tate was a chess player of the highest caliber, and despite the odds being against him, became a legendary American chess figure.

Fans of Tate will love this book. As a close friend of Emory’s, I cherish it. Most importantly, I know Emory Tate would find his portrayal in Triple Exclam!!! to be “most professional.”

For more information on this book please visit:

thechessdrum

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 20

March 1, 2017

White to play and mate in 5 moves.

Emory Tate – Macon Shibut, Washington DC 2004

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 9

February 9, 2017

White to move and mate in 3.

Emory Tate vs. Arthur Abolianin, Deurne 2000

Remembering Emory Tate on the Occasion of his Birthday

December 27, 2015
Photo of Emory Tate taken on 10/10/2015

Photo of Emory Tate taken on 10/10/2015

 

Tomorrow, 12/27/2015, would have been Emory Tate’s 57th birthday. Emory left chess enthusiasts with so much to remember him by that he will truly never be forgotten. Below, I am sharing Emory’s account of his victory in a blindfold simul held just one week before his untimely passing. All of the colorful annotations are Emory Tate’s and are placed here as an example of the passion he brought to every chess class he taught. Further proof that Emory, right up until his life ended, was a professional of the highest order.

 

[Event “Emory Tate’s Blindfold Simultaneous Exhibition”]

[Site “Fremont, California (USA)”]
[Date “2015.10.10”]
[Round “”]
[White “Tate, Emory (USA)”]
[Black “Opponent 2/5”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “D20”]
[Annotator “Emory Tate”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 {The first surprise came early.. This was my only d4 game and this move was
played by World Champion Karpov as black many many times…. This set my nerves on edge.}

Position after 2... dxc4.

Position after 2… dxc4.

 

3.e4 {Still I choose aggression.}

Position after 3. e4.

Position after 3. e4.

 

3… Nc6 {A fine move. White must react.}

Position after 3... Nc6.

Position after 3… Nc6.

4.d5 {OK}

Position after 4. d5.

Position after 4. d5.

 

4… Ne5 {A serious response… and I seem to remember that I should take on c4 now and
play the Qa4 tactic… leading to a long positional struggle. Again??? I refuse.}

Position after 4... Ne5.

Position after 4… Ne5.

5.f4 { A move seeking tactics..}

Position after 5. f4.

Position after 5. f4.

 

5… Nd3+ {Clearly best.}

Position after 5... Nd3+.

Position after 5… Nd3+.

6.Bxd3 cxd3 7.Qxd3 e6 {Now my queen is in an uncomfortable pin.. My d pawn is exposed. These new kids play very well indeed… I had to go into deep reserves of my own skill set.}

Position after 7... e6.

Position after 7… e6.

8.Nc3 Nf6 {The pressure is at the breaking point. Calm is required.}

Position after 8 ... Nf6.

Position after 8 … Nf6.

9.Nf3 exd5 {Why not c6 to crack my position once and for all??? I had prepared d6 with
nasty forks all around the center. Failing that, I protect the d6 pawn with e5
and a win! Still and all, black has two bishops and a wonderful game.. I am in trouble. The limit of tactics is revealed.}

 

Position after 9... exd5.

Position after 9… exd5.

10.e5 {I gasp for air.}

Position after 10. e5.

Position after 10. e5.

10… Nh5 {Quite risky.. Even fearless.}

Position after 10... Nh5.

Position after 10… Nh5.

11.Qxd5 {I did not want to trade queens blindfolded, but if Nd5 then c6 puts me in a pickle!}

Position after 11. Qxd5.

Position after 11. Qxd5.

11… Qxd5 12.Nxd5 Kd7 {Necessary agression.}

Position after 12. Kd7.

Position after 12. Kd7.

13.g4 {I thought here that I had tricked my young opponent… but NO!!}

Position after 13. g4.

Position after 13. g4.

13… Kc6 {!} {Meeting fire with fire. I was puzzled. What to do? So I remained calm..}

Position after 13... Kc6.

Position after 13… Kc6.

14.gxh5 Kxd5 {My pawn structure is compromised, and under eniormous pressure I announced
0-0-0 check.. only to be told.. “illegal move.” and it all came back to me.. I
have 5 boards and 5 dangerous opponents.. ultimate failure is just over the mental horizon. Honestly…}

Position after 14... Kxd5.

Position after 14… Kxd5.

15.Rg1 {Then I played Rg1 (not only to restrict his development, but a mult-faceted
move.. if he wants to move the f8 bishop, perhaps he might play g6 giving my
doubled h pawn exchangibility. Value… and there are other factors.) I was
playing my hardest now. I keep his bishop off g4, a move which could ruin me. And I survive another moment.}

Position after 15. Rg1.

Position after 15. Rg1.

15… Ke4 {A super-aggressive play. Against Tate?}

Position after 15... Ke4.

Position after 15… Ke4.

16.Ng5+ Kd3 {And he is deep in my rear area. Now I see. I considered a drawing sequence..
i.e., Nf7 Rg8 Nh6 Rh8 Nf7 Rg8 etc… Until I noticed he can break the sequence
at any time with Bb4 check. I became a bit desperate so I tossed in a check….}

Position after 16... Kd3.

Position after 16… Kd3.

17.Rg3+ Kc2 {Honestly?}

Position after 17... Kc2.

Position after 17… Kc2.

18.Rc3#  1-0

Position after 18. Rc3#

Position after 18. Rc3#

 

 

California Remembers Emory Tate

November 9, 2015
Today I had the sad honor of hosting a memorial event for International Emory Tate. This West Coast tribute to Emory was attended by many of his best friends and students. It was an inspirational afternoon and everyone who attended left with a better understanding of the man we were fortunate to befriend. At the end of the event, I announced a Torres Chess and Music Academy Scholarship in Emory’s name and also pledged to help Eric Schiller keep Emory’s memory alive through a new book about his life and games. I am deeply grateful to Janine Tate, James Paquette, Eric Schiller and Achiever Institute for their fantastic job helping me to organize such a moving tribute.
Below is the program from Emory’s memorial for those who were not able to attend today’s tribute:
 Microsoft PowerPoint - Tate Memorial Program2.pptx
Tate Memorial Program p2

In Memory of Emory

October 30, 2015

  

Fearsome attacker Emory Tate, a local chess favorite, dies at 58

October 28, 2015

This column lost a good friend — and a reliable source of Grade-A material — with the untimely passing of IM Emory Tate earlier this month at the age of 58….

Read the full article via http://ift.tt/1WhVHuj


%d bloggers like this: