Posts Tagged ‘fide world championship match’

World Chess Championship 2013: Anand Drops His Sword in Round 9

November 22, 2013

Behind by two points with a maximum of four rounds left,  Anand had to attack with the white pieces in round 9 because he faced the grim prospect of never having another opportunity to make the first move as a World Champion again. Vishy chose “pawn to d4” as his first move in, what will probably become, his most memorable game ever. Unfortunately, for Viswanathan Anand, this most memorable game included his devastating blunder on move 28. In the heat of the battle and at the peak of his attack, the reining king of chess dropped his sword.  Now, it is Magnus Carlsen who looks down upon Anand and only needs but one draw to clinch the World Chess Championship.

 

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.21”]
[Round “9”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “E25”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.d4 {Anand enters with the sword in his left hand for this fight.}
Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 {This is what chess players refer to as the Nimzo-Indian Defense. The difference
between this and the other Indian Defenses is that black does not immediately
fianchetto his bishop. Instead, his bishop pinning the knight on c3 prevents white
from playing pawn to e4 and gaining total control of the center.}
4.f3 {Alexei Shirov taught us all respect for this line back in the 1990’s.}

Alexei Shirov taught us all respect for this line back in the 1990's.

Alexei Shirov taught us all respect for this line back in the 1990’s.

d5 5.a3 {White attacks the annoying pin quickly in what is known as the Samisch Variation.}
Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 c5 {Black has no problems with opening up the center because he has better development and is ready to castle.}
7.cxd5 exd5 8.e3 c4 {This move signals that Magnus Carlsen is aware of the latest developments in
the Samisch Variation. Viswanathan Anand must have realised by this point that
he did not catch Carlsen out of his preparation.}

Carlsen knows the latest theory of the Samisch Variation.

Carlsen knows the latest theory of the Samisch Variation.

9.Ne2 {White has collected some nice wins by moving the g-pawn here.}
( 9.g3 Nc6 10.Nh3 Na5 11.Ra2 Nb3 12.Re2 O-O 13.Bg2 b5 14.O-O
a5 15.e4 b4 16.e5 Ne8 17.Bb2 bxc3 18.Bxc3 Nc7 19.a4 Bd7 20.f4
Qc8 21.f5 Bxf5 22.Nf4 Qd7 23.Ref2 Bg4 24.Qc2 Rad8 25.h3 Bf5 26.Qe2
Qxa4 27.g4 Be6 28.Qe3 Qd7 {…1-0, Berkes Ferenc (HUN) 2706 – Saric Ante (CRO) 2489 , Neum 6/ 5/2011 Ch Bosnia & Herzegovina (team)}
) ( 9.g4 Nc6 10.Bg2 Na5 11.Ne2 Bd7 12.O-O Nb3 13.Ra2 h6 14.h3
Bc6 15.e4 dxe4 16.fxe4 Nxe4 17.Ng3 Nxg3 18.Bxc6+ bxc6 19.Re1+
Kd7 20.Bf4 Qh4 21.d5 c5 22.d6 Rae8 23.Re7+ Rxe7 24.dxe7+ Kxe7
25.Qd6+ Ke8 26.Bxg3 Qe7 27.Qc6+ Kd8 28.Qa8+ Kd7 {…1-0, Yudkevich Mikhail (RUS) 2200 – Demianjuk Alexander (RUS) 2313 , Moscow 3/ 5/2012 Ch Moscow (1/2 final)}
)

Nc6 10.g4 {White’s pawn structure makes it hard for black to make use of his developmental
advantage but also prevents white from developing comfortably. In practice,
black has been doing pretty well from this position.}

The resulting pawn structure is uncomfortable for both sides.

The resulting pawn structure is uncomfortable for both sides.

 

O-O {Carlsen’s other choices were also good. The exception being 10…h6, which
Kasparov employed in his win against Judit Polgar.}
( 10…Na5 11.Ng3 h6 12.Ra2 Bd7 13.a4 Qb6 14.Ba3 O-O-O 15.Be2
Rde8 16.Kf2 h5 17.g5 h4 18.gxf6 hxg3+ 19.hxg3 Qxf6 20.f4 Bf5
21.Bf3 Qe6 22.Re2 Nb3 23.Ree1 Be4 24.Bxe4 Qxe4 25.Qg4+ f5 26.Qxg7
Rxh1 27.Rxh1 Qxh1 28.Bd6 Qh2+ {0-1, Sisatto Olli (FIN) 2236 – Alekseev Evgeny (RUS) 2659 , Rogaska Slatina 9/25/2011 Cup European Club}
) ( 10…g5 11.Ng3 h5 12.e4 h4 13.Nf5 dxe4 14.Bxg5 Bxf5 15.gxf5
exf3 16.Qxf3 Qe7+ 17.Qe2 Qxe2+ 18.Bxe2 Ne4 19.Bd2 Na5 20.Ra2
O-O-O 21.Rc2 Rhg8 22.Bf3 Rde8 23.Be3 h3 24.Ke2 Nd6 25.Kf2 Nxf5
26.Bf4 Nh4 27.Bg3 Nxf3 28.Kxf3 Nc6 29.Rb2 Re6 30.Re2 {…0-1, Santos Latasa Jaime (ESP) 2399 – Inkiov Ventzislav (BUL) 2460 , Creon 8/ 1/2012 It (open)}
) ( 10…h5 11.g5 Nh7 12.h4 Nf8 13.Ng3 Ng6 14.e4 Qc7 15.Kf2 Be6
16.Nf5 O-O-O 17.Nxg7 Bd7 18.Be2 Na5 19.Rb1 Nb3 20.Rxb3 cxb3 21.Qxb3
Ne7 22.Qb4 Bc6 23.c4 dxe4 24.d5 Rh7 25.dxc6 Nxc6 26.Qc5 Rxg7
27.Qf5+ Rd7 28.Bf4 e3+ 29.Kg2 Nd4 30.Qe4 {
…1/2-1/2, Moranda Wojciech (POL) 2536 – Gajewski Grzegorz (POL) 2577 ,
Polanica Zdroj 8/21/2008 Memorial A.Rubinstein (cat.13)} )
( 10…h6 11.Bg2 Na5 12.O-O Nb3 13.Ra2 O-O 14.Ng3 Bd7 15.Qe1
Re8 16.e4 dxe4 17.fxe4 Nxg4 18.Bf4 Qh4 19.h3 Nf6 20.e5 Rad8 21.Qf2
Nh5 22.Bxh6 Re7 23.Nf5 Qxf2+ 24.Rfxf2 Re6 25.Be3 Bc6 26.Bf1 f6
27.Bxc4 Bd5 28.Be2 fxe5 29.Bxh5 exd4 30.Bg5 {…1-0, Kasparov Garry (RUS) 2820 – Polgar Judit (HUN) 2670 , Tilburg 1997 It (cat.17)}
)

11.Bg2 Na5 {Again, Magnus Carlsen shows that he is aware of the latest trends in this
variation. Viswanathan Anand must be a little dissappointed that his opponent is so well prepared.}
( 11…b5 12.O-O Na5 13.Ng3 Nb3 14.Ra2 Bb7 15.g5 Nd7 16.e4 Qb6
17.Kh1 a5 18.e5 b4 19.Bb2 bxc3 {1/2-1/2, Vlaic Branko (CRO) 2269 – Saric Ante (CRO) 2489 , Sibenik 5/19/2011 Cup Croatia (team)}
)

Again, Magnus Carlsen shows that he is up to date on the latest trends of this variation.

Again, Magnus Carlsen shows that he is up to date on the latest trends of this variation.

 

12.O-O Nb3 13.Ra2 {This and Rb1 have both been played ten times in the last year or so.}
b5 {I was anticipating pawn to h6 here. Pawn to b5 has only ever been tried on two
other occasions and I was not aware of it’s existence in high-level chess.}
14.Ng3 {This position occured by transposition in Vlaic, Branco – Saric, Ante, Cro-Cup 2011. The game ended in a draw on move 19!?}
a5 {!} {A quality innovation by the genius that is Magnus Carlsen.}
15.g5 {!} {This is a double edged position with extreme volatility on both wings.}

This is a very double-edged position..

This is a very double-edged position..

Ne8 {Magnus Carlsen is an incredible chess talent. At first I did not realise why he
retreated his knight to this square. Later, it became clear that Carlsen needed
his knight to have access to g7 in order to prevent Anand from playing pawn to f5.}
16.e4 {Viswanathan Anand is clearing the path for his bishop on c1.}
Nxc1 {So much for the bishop on c1. ;-)}

17.Qxc1 Ra6 {!} {We always hear chess caches preaching the value of a rook in an open file.
However, rooks in open ranks are pretty good as well. In fact, Carlsen rook can
be used to aid his attack on the queenside while simultaneously providing
defensive measures for his castled king on the opposite side of the board.}

Magnus' rook becomes extremely useful on the open sixth rank.

Magnus’ rook becomes extremely useful on the open sixth rank.

18.e5 {Anand is ready to weaponize the f-pawn.}

Nc7 {!} {Carlsen really wanted to play pawn to g6 and then knight to g7. However, he saw
problems in that line and decided to place his knight on c7 in order to defend
the rook on a6. It is amazing that Carlsen was able to calculate so accurately
as to know that his knight would have time to return to the king’s defence.}
19.f4 b4 20.axb4 axb4 21.Rxa6 Nxa6 22.f5 {!} {Nobody should claim that Anand did not play aggressively after seeing this game.}

Nobody should claim that Anand did not play aggressively after viewing this game.

Nobody should claim that Anand did not play aggressively after viewing this game.

b3 {!} {Interesting that, for both colors, the pawns are the most dangerous weapons.}
23.Qf4 Nc7 {Carlsen’s knight must race back!}

24.f6 g6 25.Qh4 Ne8 {The knight returned to stop Qg7 mate.}

26.Qh6 b2 {Magnus could prevail in acquiring a second queen only to lose by being checkmated after Anand plays Rf4 followed by Rh4.}
27.Rf4 {!} b1=Q+

This is such an incredible position!

This is such an incredible position!

{!} 28.Nf1 {????} {Viswanathan Anand drops his sword in the heat of the battle. Play should have continued:}
( 28.Bf1 Qd1 29.Rh4 Qh5 30.Nxh5 gxh5 31.Rxh5 Bf5 32.g6 Bxg6 33.Rg5 )

The reigning king of chess drops his sword.

The reigning king of chess drops his sword.

Qe1 {!} {Now if Anand plays rook to h4, Carlsen’s new Queen will just capture it. Anand
put all of his eggs in one basket and then dropped the basket.} 0-1

The 2013 Fide World Championship Chess Match:

Chess Game from Round 1

Chess Game from Round 2

Chess Game from Round 3

Chess Game from Round 4

Chess Game from Round 5

Chess Game from Round 6

Chess Game from Round 7

Chess Game from Round 8

World Chess Championship 2013: A Flawless Draw in Round 8

November 20, 2013
“I didn't particularly mind a draw, as was evident from my play. I was just hoping to set him one or two traps and if not then just to shut it down.”-Magnus Carlsen(photo courtesy http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

“I didn’t particularly mind a draw, as was evident from my play. I was just hoping to set him one or two traps and if not then just to shut it down.”-Magnus Carlsen(photo courtesy http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

 

I actually really enjoyed round 8 of the 2013 Fide World Championship Chess Match. First off, Magnus Carlsen and Viswanathan Anand played an opening variation of the Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense that has not been used in World Championship play since 1886! Secondly, Carlsen and Anand played a flawless chess game and continued to play until it was clear to the hundreds of millions of viewers that it was indeed a draw. This round, coupled with game 4, game 6 and game 7 should provide the reader of my blog with enough knowledge to try the Ruy Lopez Berlin Defense the next time he/she plays chess at their local coffee shop.

Please enjoy my notes on round 8:

 

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.19”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Black “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[Eco “C67”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.O-O Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 {Steinitz played Bd3 against Zukertort in their World Chess Championship Match of 1886.}

A position from the World Chess Championship Match of 1886 and 2013!

A position from the World Chess Championship Match of 1886 and 2013!

Nxe5 8.Rxe5 O-O 9.d4 Bf6 10.Re1 Re8 {Previously, Anand had seen Nf5 played by McShane.}
( 10…Nf5 11.d5 d6 12.Nd2 Nh4 13.g3 Ng6 14.a4 Ne5 15.Ra3 a5
16.Ne4 Be7 17.f4 Ng4 18.Bg2 h6 19.c4 Nf6 20.Nc3 Nd7 21.Nb5 Nc5
22.Rae3 Bf6 23.Bf3 Bd7 24.b3 Rb8 25.Kg2 Re8 26.Ba3 Rxe3 27.Rxe3
Bxb5 28.cxb5 b6 29.Bg4 g6 30.h4 {…1/2-1/2, Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2800 – McShane Luke J (ENG) 2657 , London 12/12/2010 It (cat.19)}
)

11.c3 {And as long as I am talking about McShane.}
( 11.Bf4 Rxe1 12.Qxe1 Ne8 13.Nc3 Bxd4 14.Nd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bf6 16.Nxf6+
Nxf6 17.Bxf6 gxf6 18.Qe4 f5 19.Qe3 Be6 20.Qg3+ Kf8 21.Qc3 Ke7
22.Re1 Kd7 23.Bc4 Qh8 24.Bxe6+ fxe6 25.Qb3 Re8 26.Qxb7 Rb8 27.Qxa7
Qxb2 28.Qa4+ Qb5 29.Qh4 Qa5 30.Qxh7+ Kc6 {…1-0, McShane Luke J (ENG) 2706 – Kramnik Vladimir (RUS) 2801 , Moscow 6/16/2012 Memorial M.Tal (cat.22)}
)

Rxe1 12.Qxe1 Ne8 {Qe8 is much more natural but Anand does not want to trade queens just yet.}

Anand plays a strange looking knight move with a neat maneuver in mind.

Anand plays a strange looking knight move with a neat maneuver in mind.

( 12…Qe8 13.Qxe8+ Nxe8 14.Bf4 d5 15.Bd3 a5 16.Nd2 Bd7 17.Re1
c6 18.h3 g6 19.Nf3 Rd8 20.g4 Bg7 21.Kg2 Bf8 22.Bg3 Nd6 23.Bh4
Ra8 24.a4 Kg7 25.b3 f6 26.c4 Re8 27.Rxe8 Nxe8 28.c5 Nc7 29.g5
Be7 30.Bg3 Ne6 31.gxf6+ Bxf6 32.Be5 {…0-1, Frolyanov Dmitry (RUS) 2564 – Alekseev Evgeny (RUS) 2677 , Tiumen 6/26/2012 Ch Russia (Higher League)}
) ( 12…Nf5 13.Bf4 c6 14.Nd2 d5 15.Nf3 Nd6 16.Bd3 Bf5 17.Bxf5
Nxf5 18.Qe2 Qe7 19.Qd3 Nh4 20.Nxh4 Bxh4 21.g3 Bf6 {1/2-1/2, Smeets Jan (NED) 2619 – Kramnik Vladimir (RUS) 2791 , Wijk aan Zee 1/26/2011 It (cat.20)}
)

13.Bf4 {Magnus Carlsen has a very comfortable position and developing either bishop makes sense.}
( 13.Bd3 d5 {1/2-1/2, Koepke Christian (GER) 2319 – Bindrich Falko (GER) 2554 , Nuernberg 9/11/2011 It (open) “LGA Premium Cup”}
)

d5 {Anand gets a piece of the center.}

14.Bd3 g6 {Anand has a tricky knight maneuver in mind. Other ideas for this position are:}
( 14…Be6 15.Nd2 Nd6 16.Nf3 Bf5 17.Bxf5 Nxf5 18.Qd2 c6 19.Bg5
Nd6 20.Bxf6 Qxf6 21.Re1 Ne4 22.Qe3 h5 23.Nd2 Re8 24.Nxe4 Rxe4
25.Qd2 Qe6 26.Kf1 Kf8 27.f3 Rxe1+ 28.Qxe1 Qf5 29.a3 f6 30.Qd2
h4 31.Kf2 g5 32.Qe3 Kf7 33.Qd2 Qb1 34.g3 {…0-1, Geske Julian (GER) 2391 – Levin Felix (GER) 2510 , Wiesbaden 8/25/2012 It “Schlosspark Open”}
) ( 14…Qe7 15.Nd2 Qxe1+ 16.Rxe1 Be6 17.Nb3 Rd8 18.Na5 Bc8 19.Bb5
c6 20.Bxc6 bxc6 21.Nxc6 Kf8 22.Nxd8 Bxd8 23.Bb8 a6 24.Ba7 Be6
25.g4 Nf6 26.Bc5+ Ke8 27.f3 Kd7 28.Kf1 {1/2-1/2, Mamedov Nidjat (AZE) 2601 – Nielsen Peter Heine (DEN) 2665 , Konya 7/16/2012 Ch Turkey (team)}
)

15.Nd2 Ng7 16.Qe2 {Carlsen elects to set up a battery in the e-file rather than move his knight to f3.}
( 16.Nf3 c6 17.Qd2 Bf5 18.Re1 Bxd3 19.Qxd3 Qd7 20.Be5 Bxe5 21.Nxe5
Qf5 22.Qxf5 Nxf5 23.Nd3 Kf8 24.Nc5 Nd6 25.Nd7+ Kg7 26.Nc5 Kf8
27.Nd7+ Kg7 28.Nc5 Kf8 29.Nd7+ Kg7 30.Nc5 Kf8 {1/2-1/2, Salgado Lopez Ivan (ESP) 2618 – Bruzon Lazaro (CUB) 2691 , Quito 4/19/2012 Ch IberoAmerican (final) (Gp A)}
)

c6 17.Re1 {I would much rather be white. Having said that, it is not easy to find a good plan of attack.}
Bf5 18.Bxf5 Nxf5 19.Nf3 Ng7 20.Be5 Ne6 {Anand’s knight has been very busy today.}
21.Bxf6 Qxf6 22.Ne5 Re8 23.Ng4 {Magnus Carlsen’s technique is stellar. He tried a few ideas and now is going to force Anand to settle for another draw.}
Qd8 24.Qe5 Ng7

All the pieces are going to magically disappear.

All the pieces are going to magically disappear.

25.Qxe8+ {This is a pretty way to exchange all the pieces.}
Nxe8 26.Rxe8+ Qxe8 27.Nf6+ Kf8 28.Nxe8 Kxe8 29.f4 {It is not often that we get to see a couple of GM’s play a simple endgame like this.}
f5 30.Kf2 b5 31.b4 Kf7 32.h3 h6 33.h4 h5 {This was a beautiful example of two top chess players playing flawless chess.}
1/2-1/2

It doesn't get more drawn than this!

It doesn’t get more drawn than this!

 

My posts on the Fide World Chess Championship

Round 1 analysis

Round 2 analysis

Round 3 analysis

Round 4 analysis

Round 5 analysis

Round 6 analysis

Round 7 analysis

 

World Chess Championship 2013: Anand Stops the Bleeding in Round 7

November 20, 2013
Anand managed to stop the bleeding in round 7. (phot courtesy of TheColor.com)

Anand managed to stop the bleeding in round 7. (phot courtesy of TheColor.com)

 

After two difficult losses in game 5 and game 6, Viswanathan Anand was able to regain his form and create a draw in round 7. To his fans, this was seen as a disappointing result. Anand’s many critics seem unable to comprehend that, “Sometimes, in order to win the war, you must first stop the bleeding.”

Below are my notes on round 7:

 

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.18”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[Eco “C65”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 {Another Ruy Lopez, Berlin. If you are a regular reader of my blog you may just have a new line in your repertoir.}

The Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

The Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

4.d3 Bc5 5.Bxc6 {Anand has castled here in the past.}

( 5.O-O Nd4 6.Nxd4 Bxd4 7.c3 Bb6 8.Nd2 c6 9.Ba4 O-O 10.Nc4 Bc7
11.Ne3 d5 12.Qf3 d4 13.cxd4 Qxd4 14.Bc2 Be6 15.Rd1 Bb6 16.h3
Rad8 17.Bb3 Bxb3 18.axb3 Qb4 19.Nc4 Nd7 20.Bd2 Qxb3 21.Bc3 Bc5
22.Nxe5 Nxe5 23.Bxe5 Bd4 24.Bxd4 Rxd4 {…1/2-1/2, Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2817 – Kramnik Vladimir (RUS) 2781 , Moscow 9/ 2/2011 Memorial M.Botvinnik (active)}
)

dxc6

6.Nbd2 {“I chose a line that both of us had played quite a bit in the past. 6.Nbd2.”-Viswanathan Anand}
Bg4 {“He went for Bg4 instead. Then you get a slow kind of manoeuvring game after
the next three moves. White has two plans, which is, one is to play f4 and the
other like in the game which is to play on the h-file.”-Viswanathan Anand Perhaps Anand was hoping for one of these lines:}
( 6…Be6 7.O-O Bd6 8.b3 Nd7 9.Nc4 Bxc4 10.bxc4 O-O 11.Rb1 b6
12.g3 f5 13.exf5 Rxf5 14.Qe2 Nc5 15.Be3 Ne6 16.Nd2 Qf6 17.Qg4
Rf8 18.Ne4 Qf7 19.a4 h5 20.Qe2 Be7 21.a5 Qg6 22.axb6 axb6 23.Kh1
Rf3 24.Rbe1 Bb4 25.Ra1 Qg4 26.Qd1 {…1/2-1/2, Carlsen Magnus (NOR) 2843 – Aronian Levon (ARM) 2821 , Sao Paulo 9/28/2012 It “Final Masters” (cat.22)}
) ( 6…Nd7 7.O-O O-O 8.Nc4 Re8 9.Be3 Bxe3 10.fxe3 a5 11.a4 b6
12.Qe1 Ba6 13.Ncd2 Re6 14.Nh4 g6 15.Qg3 Qf8 16.Rf2 Qg7 17.Qh3
Rd8 18.g4 Rf6 19.Ndf3 Bc8 20.Kh1 Nc5 21.Qg3 Re8 22.b3 Re7 23.h3
Rd6 24.Kh2 h6 25.g5 h5 26.Nd2 {…1/2-1/2, Zvjaginsev Vadim (RUS) 2664 – Petrosian Tigran L (ARM) 2613 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club}
)

7.h3 {Nc4 was tried with success here.} ( 7.Nc4 Nd7 8.Be3 Bxe3
9.Nxe3 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 Qf6 11.Qxf6 Nxf6 12.Nc4 Nd7 13.O-O-O c5 14.Rdf1
Ke7 15.f4 f6 16.fxe5 fxe5 17.Ne3 Ke6 18.Nd5 Rac8 19.Rf5 c6 20.Ne3
Rcf8 21.Rhf1 g6 22.Rxf8 Rxf8 23.Rxf8 Nxf8 24.Kd2 Nd7 25.Ke2 Nf6
26.Kf3 b6 {…1-0, Libiszewski Fabien (FRA) 2509 – Michalczak Thomas (GER) 2320 , Reykjavik 3/11/2012 It (open)}
)

Bh5 {Magnus Carlsen’s move seems the most logical. If black captures he gets rid of
a good pin and helps white develop. Below is a game where white won after the bishop captures on f3:}
( 7…Bxf3 8.Qxf3 Nd7 9.Qg3 Qf6 10.Nc4 O-O 11.O-O Rfe8 12.a4
Nf8 13.Bg5 Qe6 14.Bd2 Ng6 15.b4 Bf8 16.Qg4 b6 17.g3 f6 18.Bc3
Bd6 19.Ne3 Kh8 20.Kg2 a6 21.Qf3 Ne7 22.h4 b5 23.Rfb1 Qd7 24.h5
h6 25.Qg4 Qxg4 26.Nxg4 Nc8 27.Bd2 {…1-0, Adams Michael (ENG) 2724 – Fressinet Laurent (FRA) 2693 , Germany 3/17/2012 Bundesliga 2011/12}
)

8.Nf1 {This is an innovation that has never been played at a high level before.
Amazing that on move 8, Anand introduces a new move to the world.}

By placing his knight on f1, Anand played an early innovation in the Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

By placing his knight on f1, Anand played an early innovation in the Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

Nd7

9.Ng3 {Viswanathan Anand faced a lot of criticism for his play in this game and the
match. I, for one, enjoy the fact that he has given white a new knight placement in the oldest of chess openings.}
Bxf3 10.Qxf3 {Anand has better development and a better pawn structure.}
g6 {Magnus Carlsen plays a slow move but one that takes key squares away from Anand’s knight.}
11.Be3 Qe7 12.O-O-O O-O-O 13.Ne2 {So far the only result from Anand’s new knight placement was causing black to
play g6. Since the knight has no future on g3, Anand will attempt to find a better location to justify his earlier innovation.}

Carlsen's pawn to g6 seems to have shut down Anand's earlier innovation.

Carlsen’s pawn to g6 seems to have shut down Anand’s earlier innovation.

Rhe8 {Other than his knight on d7, Magnus Carlsen has pretty good piece placement.}
14.Kb1 {Anand takes a moment to improve king safety a little. However, Carlsen wasn’t
threatening anything in particular. This is where his fans would like to see
him be a little more aggressive. Perhaps something like this:}
( 14.g4 Qe6 15.Kb1 Kb8 16.Bxc5 Nxc5 17.Qe3 b6 18.Rhf1 f5 19.exf5
gxf5 20.d4 {and white has a small advantage in a complex situation.} )
b6 {This move doesn’t look right. However, if the “Mozart of Chess” thinks his king should be on b7, who am I to argue?}
15.h4 {Anand honestly thought this would put pressure on his opponent.}

Anand's h-pawn embarks on a senseless expedition.

Anand’s h-pawn embarks on a senseless expedition.

Kb7

16.h5 {I really see no reason to believe that this plan should cause black any problems.}
Bxe3

17.Qxe3 {Anand is playing simply to stop the bleeding from his last two losses. If he
had been playing for a win, Anand would have taken with the f-pawn.}
Nc5

18.hxg6 hxg6 19.g3 {Viswanathan Anand just wants a draw to break his losing streak.}
a5 {!?} {Magnus Carlsen signals that he is willing to try and make it three wins in a
row. Safer and should I say more proper would be to challenge Anand for the h-file by playing rook to h8.}
20.Rh7 Rh8 21.Rdh1 Rxh7 22.Rxh7 Qf6 23.f4 Rh8 24.Rxh8 Qxh8 {With the rooks off the board, the drawing chances are much higher. Anand must not blunder and then he will have achieved his unstated goal of a draw.}

If Anand can avoid blundering, he can achieve his draw.

If Anand can avoid blundering, he can achieve his draw.

25.fxe5 Qxe5 26.Qf3 f5 {Now Anand can trade away his pawn center as Carlsen allows Anand’s queen to become an equal to his own. ;-)}
27.exf5 gxf5 28.c3 {There is a 0% chance that Carlsen would allow Anand to fork his knight and queen with pawn to d4.}
Ne6 29.Kc2 Ng5 30.Qf2 Ne6 31.Qf3 Ng5 32.Qf2 Ne6 {The game is drawn by the threat of repitition. Magnus Carlsen showed a lot of maturity in this game while Anand showed very little fight.} 1/2-1/2

 

Fide World Chess Championship 2013:

Game 1 Analysis

Game 2 Analysis

Game 3 Analysis

Game 4 Analysis

Game 5 Analysis

Game 6 Analysis

 

 

World Chess Championship 2013: Anand Loses Again in Game 6

November 18, 2013

The 2013 Fide World Chamionship Match is close to being over at the half-way point. Viswanathan Anand received his second straight loss after playing poorly in a “drawish” rook and pawn endgame. At the press conference, for the second round in a row, Anand failed to recognize the location of his actual loosing mistake. What Anand does seem clear about is what today’s loss means to his future as a chess champion. After the loss in round 6, Anand simply said, “Today is a heavy blow…. I won’t pretend otherwise.”

An always classy Anand appears solemn at the post game press conference.(Photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

An always classy Anand appears solemn at the post game press conference.(Photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.16”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C65”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 {The same position as in game four. In other words, it is a Ruy Lopez Berlin Defence.}
4.d3 {Viswanathan Anand chose “4.O-O Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6” in game four. This is the other main variation.}
Bc5 {Magnus Carlsen could have also played d6 here.}

5.c3 {White had a lot of good choices but this is a rather Anand like move.}
( 5.Nxe5 Bxf2+ 6.Kxf2 Nxe5 {Proof that the Fork Trick does not work so well here.}
)

O-O {I often employ something like this:} ( 5…Qe7 6.O-O a6
7.Bxc6 dxc6 8.Nxe5 Qxe5 9.d4 Qe7 10.dxc5 O-O 11.Bg5 Qxe4 12.Bxf6
gxf6 13.Re1 Qg4 14.Qc1 Bf5 15.Re3 Bg6 16.Nd2 Rfe8 17.Nb3 Qg5
18.Rxe8+ Rxe8 19.Qxg5 fxg5 20.Na5 Re2 21.b3 Rc2 22.Nxb7 Rxc3
23.f3 Rc2 24.b4 g4 25.Re1 {…1/2-1/2, Aagaard Jacob (SCO) 2522 – Christensen Tobias (DEN) 2346 , Denmark 1/15/2012 Ch Denmark (team) 2011/12}
)

6.O-O Re8 {More often, black plays d6 to defend e5.}

7.Re1 {Some other good choices are:} ( 7.Nbd2 a6 8.Bxc6 dxc6 9.Nc4
Nd7 10.Re1 Bf8 11.d4 exd4 12.cxd4 Nf6 13.Nce5 Be6 14.h3 Nd7 15.Nd3
f6 16.Qc2 Bf7 17.Bd2 a5 18.b3 Ba3 19.Rad1 Nf8 20.Bc1 Bxc1 21.Nxc1
Qd7 22.Ne2 Bh5 23.Nh4 Qe7 24.f3 Bf7 25.Nc3 Rad8 26.Qf2 Qb4 {…1-0, Alekseev Evgeny (RUS) 2683 – Godena Michele (ITA) 2526 , Eilat 10/11/2012 Cup European Club}
) ( 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bh4 Bf8 9.Nbd2 d6 10.d4 exd4 11.Nxd4 Bd7 12.Nxc6
bxc6 13.Bd3 Be7 14.f4 Qb8 15.Bxf6 Bxf6 16.e5 dxe5 17.Ne4 Qxb2
18.f5 Red8 19.Bc4 Be8 20.Qh5 Rd6 21.Rab1 Qc2 22.Qg4 Kf8 23.h3
Rad8 24.Kh2 Qa4 25.Rb4 Qa3 26.Rb7 R6d7 {…1-0, Carlsen Magnus (NOR) 2826 – Howell David WL (ENG) 2633 , London 12/ 3/2011 It (cat.20)}
)

a6

8.Ba4 b5 ( 8…h6 9.h3 b5 10.Bb3 Bb6 11.Nbd2 d5 12.exd5
Nxd5 13.d4 Nf4 14.Nf1 Nxg2 15.Kxg2 Qd7 16.Ng1 Bb7 17.d5 Na5 18.Be3
c5 19.f3 f5 20.d6+ Nxb3 21.axb3 Re6 22.b4 Rxd6 23.Qe2 Rg6+ 24.Kh1
Bc7 25.bxc5 Qc6 26.Nh2 Re8 27.Rad1 Ree6 28.Qd2 {…1-0, Abreu Aryam (CUB) 2487 – Alvarez Pedraza Aramis (CUB) 2466 , Habana 5/11/2008 Memorial J.Capablanca (open)}
)

9.Bb3 {The famous chess queen, Alexandra Kosteniuk, lost with Bc2.}
( 9.Bc2 d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.a4 b4 12.Ng5 h6 13.Ne4 Bb6 14.Qh5
Nf6 15.Qf3 Nxe4 16.Qxe4 Qd6 17.Nd2 f5 18.Qh4 Qe7 19.Qg3 bxc3
20.bxc3 Qf6 21.Nc4 Bd7 22.Nxb6 cxb6 23.Rb1 Na7 24.Qe3 Qg6 25.f3
b5 26.axb5 Nxb5 27.Bb3+ Kh8 28.Ba4 Bc6 {…0-1, Zhao Dindin (CHN) 2217 – Kosteniuk Alexandra (RUS) 2469 , Szeged 1994 Ch World (juniors) (under 10) (g)}
)

d6 {This is a very equal position. I like Carlsen’s move a little better than:}
( 9…h6 10.Nbd2 d6 11.h3 Bd7 12.Nf1 Qc8 13.Be3 Bxe3 14.Nxe3
Be6 15.Bc2 Bd7 16.Nh4 Qd8 17.Nhf5 Bxf5 18.Nxf5 Ne7 19.g4 Nxf5
20.gxf5 d5 21.Qe2 dxe4 22.dxe4 c6 23.a4 Nh7 24.Kh2 Qh4 25.Rg1
Ng5 26.Rg3 Red8 27.Qe3 Qf4 28.Bd3 Rab8 29.axb5 {…1-0, Recuero Guerra David (ESP) 2471 – Rodriguez Gonzalez Ruben (ESP), Santa Olaya 2000 It (open)}
)

10.Bg5 {Viswanathan Anand goes straight for the pin. Here are some other interesting games from this line:}
( 10.a4 Bb7 11.Nbd2 h6 12.Nf1 Ne7 13.Ng3 Ng6 14.axb5 axb5 15.Rxa8
Bxa8 16.Ba2 Qd7 17.h3 Bb6 18.Nh2 d5 19.Nh5 Nxh5 20.Qxh5 Nf4 21.Bxf4
exf4 22.Nf3 c6 23.d4 Qa7 24.Bb1 c5 25.e5 Bc6 26.Qf5 cxd4 27.cxd4
Bxd4 28.Nxd4 Qxd4 29.Qh7+ Kf8 {…1-0, Bauer Christian (FRA) 2631 – Marciano David (FRA) 2522 , Switzerland 10/22/2011 Ch Switzerland (team) 2011}
) ( 10.Nbd2 Be6 11.Nf1 Bb6 12.h3 h6 13.Ng3 Bxb3 14.axb3 a5 15.Nh2
Qd7 16.Ng4 Nxg4 17.hxg4 f6 18.Nf5 Ne7 19.Be3 Bxe3 20.Rxe3 d5
21.Re1 d4 22.Qc2 c5 23.c4 Nxf5 24.gxf5 Reb8 25.Ra3 Kh7 26.Rea1
Qc7 27.Qd2 bxc4 28.bxc4 Rb4 29.b3 Rab8 {…1/2-1/2, Dominguez Lenier (CUB) 2716 – Karjakin Sergey (UKR) 2717 , Moscow 11/16/2009 It “World Blitz”}
)

Be6

11.Nbd2 h6 12.Bh4 Bxb3 13.axb3 {Viswanathan Anand’s rook on a1 is all of a sudden developed without ever moving.}
Nb8 {Explaining all the reasoning behind this move would take too much space in the
context of analyzing this game. However, it is quite common to redeploy the
knight to d7 in the Breyer System of the Ruy Lopez. Clearly this is what Magnus intends.}
( 13…Bb6 14.Nf1 g5 15.Bg3 d5 16.exd5 Qxd5 17.Ne3 Qd7 18.h3
Rad8 19.Rxa6 Qxd3 20.Qc1 Re6 21.Kh2 Ne4 22.Rxb6 cxb6 23.Rd1 Qe2
24.Re1 Qd3 25.Rd1 Qe2 26.Re1 Qd3 {1/2-1/2, Spraggett Kevin (CAN) 2580 – Fedorchuk Sergey A (UKR) 2645 , Metz 4/19/2007 It (open)}
)

14.h3 {Viswanathan Anand is creating a whole so he can redeploy his knight as well.}
Nbd7

15.Nh2 Qe7 {Magnus Carlsen has completed my three opening goals: 1. Pawn in the center, 2. Castle, 3. Unify rooks.}
16.Ndf1 {This is not for defence. Viswanathan Anand want his knight on e3 where it would see d5 and f5.}
Bb6 {Magnus Carlsen gets his bishop out of the way so that he can play c5 and prevent Anand from playing pawn to d4.}
17.Ne3 Qe6 {This stops the threats surrounding Nd5 and also places tthe queen on a more active square.}
18.b4 a5 19.bxa5 Bxa5 20.Nhg4 {Viswanathan Anand has succesfully redeployed both his knights.}
Bb6

21.Bxf6 Nxf6 22.Nxf6+ Qxf6 23.Qg4 {?} {A slight inaccuracy which give Carlsen some rope to work with. Better was something along the lines of:}
( 23.Qe2 Bxe3 24.Qxe3 c5 25.b4 Qe7 26.Reb1 cxb4 27.cxb4 Ra4 28.Rxa4
bxa4 29.b5 Rb8 30.b6 a3 31.Ra1 d5 32.exd5 Qd6 )

Bxe3

24.fxe3 Qe7 25.Rf1 c5 {Magnus Carlsen has an advantage in space and pawn structure.}
26.Kh2 c4 {Magnus is trying to make something happen because he has a small advantage,
Really, this game should be a draw. But, I could say that about the starting position as well.}
27.d4 Rxa1 {I didn’t expect Magnus Carlsen to give up control of the a-file.}
28.Rxa1 Qb7 {Afther this, the a-file is rather useless for Anand anyways.}
29.Rd1 {Anand is pushing toward complications because he is behind in the match. An easier draw can be had after playing pawn to d5.}
Qc6 {I think Magnus is kind of offering a draw by coaxing Anand to play pawn to d5.}
30.Qf5 {Viswanathan Anand still is hoping for something.}

exd4

31.Rxd4 Re5 32.Qf3 Qc7 {Magnus Carlsen thrives in endgame complications.}

33.Kh1 {Viswanathan Anand’s instincts are to take his king off of the same diagonal as
his opponents queen so that he does not lose the game to tactics.}
Qe7

34.Qg4 Kh7 35.Qf4 g6 36.Kh2 Kg7 {Should the pieces come off the board the kings want to be as close to the action as possible.}
37.Qf3 Re6

Anand plays 38.Qg3 which simply blunders a pawn.

Anand plays 38.Qg3 which simply blunders a pawn.

38.Qg3 {?} {Anand blunders a pawn without explanation.}
Rxe4

39.Qxd6 Rxe3 40.Qxe7 Rxe7 41.Rd5 Rb7 {A pawn up, Magnus Carlsen is definitely in the drivers seat in a “drawish” rook and pawn endgame.}
42.Rd6 f6 43.h4 Kf7 {“At this point I missed the whole h5 idea. I didn’t really think you could give up a pawn like that.”-Magnus Carlsen}

Magnus Carlsen admits to missing Anand's next idea of pawn to h5.

Magnus Carlsen admits to missing Anand’s next idea of pawn to h5.

44.h5 gxh5 45.Rd5 Kg6 46.Kg3 Rb6 {Magnus Carlsen keeps placing his rook in the same rank as his king so that he
can move pawns forward without annoying checks by Anand.}

47.Rc5 f5 48.Kh4 Re6 49.Rxb5 Re4+ 50.Kh3 Kg5 51.Rb8 {Viswanathan Anand’s rook wants to have checking distance.}
h4 {“Now it’s a draw but I had one little trap, Kf4 to Ke3. Well fortunately, he went for it.”-Magnus Carlsen}

Magnus Carlsen has "one little trap" left.

Magnus Carlsen has “one little trap” left.

52.Rg8+ Kh5 53.Rf8 Rf4 54.Rc8 {One of the players would need to make a huge blunder for this game to result into a full point for someone.}
Rg4

55.Rf8 Rg3+ 56.Kh2 Kg5 57.Rg8+ {This is where Anand wrongly believed he lost the game. “Here I gave
this check…. Rc8 is just a draw.”-Viswanathan Anand}

This is where Anand feels he lost the game.

This is where Anand feels he lost the game.

 

Kf4

58.Rc8 Ke3 59.Rxc4 {“I thought he was going to go for Rg4 or a similar idea and then I’m OK. But I just blundered into f4.”-Viswanathan Anand}
f4

60.Ra4 {??} {This is the real location of Viswanathan Anand’s fatal error. I am sure he knows this now.}
( 60.b4 h3 61.gxh3 Rg6 62.Rc7 f3 63.Re7+ Kf4 64.Rf7+ Ke4 65.c4
Rg2+ 66.Kh1 Rc2 67.c5 Rc1+ 68.Kh2 Ke3 69.Re7+ Kf4 70.Rf7+ Ke3
71.Re7+ Kf4 72.Rf7+ Ke3 {and this is the three-fold repition draw.} )

This is where Anand really lost the game.

This is where Anand really lost the game.

h3 {!}

61.gxh3 Rg6 {Perfect technique by Magnus Carlsen.}

62.c4{?} {Ra7 had a better chance for a draw.} ( 62.Ra7 f3 63.b4 Rg2+
64.Kh1 Re2 65.Re7+ Kd2 66.Rd7+ Ke1 67.Ra7 Kf1 68.c4 f2 69.Kh2
Re1 70.Rf7 Ke2 71.Kg3 f1=Q {But Carlsen still would have won.} )

f3

63.Ra3+ Ke2 64.b4 f2 65.Ra2+ {Anand keeps trying to avoid another loss in front of his fans, but his defeat is inevitable.}
Kf3

66.Ra3+ Kf4 67.Ra8 Rg1 {A very solem Anand resigned as white for his second consecutive loss.}
0-1

Game 1 Analysis

Game 2 Analysis

Game 3 Analysis

Game 4 Analysis

Game 5 Analysis

World Chess Championship 2013: Carlsen Wins Game 5!

November 15, 2013
Magnus is all smiles after winning round 5. (Photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

Magnus is all smiles after winning round 5. (Photo courtesy of http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/)

In Round 5 of the 2013 Fide World Chess Championship Match, Magnus Carlsen delivered a figurative punch to the gut of the Champion, Viswanathan Anand. It has become clear that Magnus Carlsen respects Viswanathan Anand’s  opening knowledge much more than he respects his actual chess skills. Carlsen’s plan with the white pieces has been to get Anand “out of book” and then outplay the champion in unconventional positions. That is precisely what Magnus did in round 5.

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.15”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Black “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “D31”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

1.c4 e6 2.d4 d5 {This is the Queen’s Gambit Declined(1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6.)}
3.Nc3 c6 {Semi-Slav variation.}

4.e4 {Most common here is Nf3. Carlsen is quickly trying to steer this game into lesser known variations.}
dxe4

5.Nxe4 Bb4+ 6.Nc3 {Another uncommon move. Bishop to d2 is the standard reply.}
c5

7.a3 Ba5 8.Nf3 {This move has only been played 12 times before. I give the more common move and variation below.}
( 8.Be3 Nf6 9.dxc5 Qxd1+ 10.Rxd1 Ne4 11.Nge2 Nxc3 12.Nxc3 Bxc3+
13.bxc3 Bd7 14.Be2 Bc6 15.O-O Nd7 16.Rd2 O-O-O 17.Rb2 e5 18.f4
Rhe8 19.fxe5 Nxe5 20.Bd4 f6 21.Rfb1 Be4 22.Rd1 Nc6 23.Kf2 Re7
24.Rbd2 Red7 25.Bg4 f5 26.Re2 Bxg2 27.Bxf5 Rf8 {…1-0, Piskov Yury (RUS) 2442 – Dreev Alexey (RUS) 2711 , Yurmala 1982 Ch URS (juniors)}
)

Nf6

9.Be3 {Be2 is also playable.} ( 9.Be2 O-O 10.O-O cxd4 11.Nb5
e5 12.Nxe5 Bb6 13.b4 a6 14.c5 axb5 15.cxb6 Qxb6 16.Bb2 Rd8 17.Qd3
Be6 18.Rfd1 Nc6 19.Nxc6 bxc6 20.Bxd4 Qc7 21.Qe3 Ne8 22.Bb6 Rxd1+
23.Rxd1 Qe7 24.Bf3 Rc8 25.h3 Nf6 26.Bc5 Qe8 27.Rd6 Nd5 28.Qg5
h6 {…1-0, Dziuba Marcin (POL) 2556 – Guichard Pauline (FRA) 2277 , Warsaw 12/21/2008 Ch Europe (active)}
)

Nc6 ( 9…O-O 10.Qc2 cxd4 11.Bxd4 Nc6 12.Bc5 Bxc3+ 13.Qxc3
Ne4 14.Qe3 Nxc5 15.Qxc5 Qf6 16.O-O-O Qf4+ 17.Qe3 Qxe3+ 18.fxe3
e5 19.Be2 f6 20.Rd6 Kf7 21.Rhd1 Ke7 22.c5 Be6 23.Bb5 Rac8 24.Bxc6
bxc6 25.e4 Rc7 26.R1d3 Rb8 27.Ne1 Rb5 28.b4 a5 29.Nc2 {…0-1, Mester Gyula (HUN) 2400 – Hajnal Zoltan (HUN) 2225 , Miskolc 1998 It (open) “Avas”}
)

10.Qd3 {This is the first time this position has occurred in recorded chess history.}
( 10.Be2 Ne4 11.Rc1 cxd4 12.Nxd4 Nxc3 13.bxc3 Nxd4 14.Bxd4 O-O
15.O-O Bd7 16.Bf3 {1/2-1/2, Mellado Trivino Juan (AND) 2460 – Korneev Oleg (RUS) 2605 , Manresa 1995 It (open)}
) ( 10.dxc5 Bxc3+ 11.bxc3 Qa5 12.Qc2 Ng4 13.Qc1 O-O 14.Be2 Nxe3
15.Qxe3 Ne7 16.O-O Nf5 17.Qe4 Qxc5 18.Rfd1 f6 19.Bd3 g6 20.h4
Ng7 21.Qd4 Qxd4 22.cxd4 Bd7 23.Be4 Rab8 24.Rab1 Rfc8 25.Bxb7
Rxc4 26.d5 Rc7 27.dxe6 Bxe6 28.Be4 Rxb1 29.Rxb1 Nf5 {…1/2-1/2, Polgar Zsuzsa (USA) 2545 – Portisch Lajos (HUN) 2585 , Budapest 1993 Zt}
) ( 10.d5 exd5 11.Bxc5 Ne4 12.Qe2 Be6 13.O-O-O Nxc5 14.cxd5 Qf6
15.dxe6 Nxe6 16.Nd5 Qh6+ 17.Kb1 O-O 18.Qb5 Rab8 19.Ne7+ Nxe7
20.Qxa5 Nc6 21.Qf5 g6 22.Qf6 Qg7 23.Qxg7+ Kxg7 24.Bc4 Kf6 25.Bxe6
fxe6 26.Rd7 h6 27.Rhd1 Rbd8 28.Kc2 Rxd7 29.Rxd7 Rf7 {…1/2-1/2, Kubala Martin (CZE) 2295 – Splosnov Sergei (BLR) 2350 , Frydek-Mistek 1998 It (cat.4)}
)

cxd4

11.Nxd4 Ng4 {This position looks dead even. Now it will be up to the better chess player to win.}
12.O-O-O {Castling queen-side is a signal that Magnus Carlsen is confident playing for the win.}
Nxe3 {Viswanathan Anand isolates one of Carlsen’s pawns and gets rid of his bishop pair.}
13.fxe3 Bc7 {?} {If Anand had played Qe7 instead he would have stopped the trade of queens and
made playing pawn to b4 rather tricky for Carlsen. Play might have continued as follows:}
( 13…Qe7 14.Kb1 O-O 15.Qc2 Rd8 16.Bd3 g6 17.Nf3 Bd7 {And Viswanathan Anand would have a solid position in a flavor he feels comfortable with.}
)

14.Nxc6 bxc6 15.Qxd8+ Bxd8 16.Be2 Ke7 {?} {Anand’s play is not aggressive enough. It is better to develop with threats and play Bb6.}
17.Bf3 {Magnus Carlsen is more than happy to attack weak and pinned targets.}
Bd7

18.Ne4 Bb6 {?} {It is too late for this move to work now. Magnus can just play pawn to c5.}
19.c5 f5 {Nice, but now Anand loses his bishop pair.}

20.cxb6 fxe4 21.b7 {!} {I am fairly confident that Anand missed this move when he played 18… Bb6.}
Rab8

22.Bxe4 Rxb7 {White has, “a better bishop and a better pawn structure.”-Magnus Carlsen}

White has, "a better bishop and a better pawn structure."-Magnus Carlsen

White has, “a better bishop and a better pawn structure.”-Magnus Carlsen

23.Rhf1 {and “two open files.”-Chris Torres}

Rb5 {It is not stated as often as it should be that, “rooks on open ranks are pretty good too.”}
24.Rf4 {!?} {Magnus goes about forming a rook battery in not the safest of ways but I
believe the intent is to trick Anand into replying with pawn to g5.}
g5 {Most everybody who is anybody would have played as Anand. Is the “Mozart of Chess” tricking the world?}
25.Rf3 h5 26.Rdf1 Be8 {Obviously this stops Rf7+.}

27.Bc2 {Clearly Carlsen wants Anand to play Rc5.}
Rc5 {Anand does not let Carlsen’s desires stop him from playing strong moves.}
28.Rf6 h4 {Now Magnus Carlsen’s king side pawns can’t move without creating unnecessary
weaknesses or allow the rook on h8 to become a powerful contributor.}
29.e4 {Blocks the bishop but gains the center.}

a5

30.Kd2 {The king must be active in the endgame.}
Rb5

31.b3 {Magnus Carlsen’s bishop is now blocked on both diagonals by its own pawns yet his position it still clearly better.}
Bh5 {Anand now has a clearly superior bishop.}

32.Kc3 Rc5+ {This puts a stop to the white king’s incursions.}
33.Kb2 Rd8 {?} {This move looks so good Anand failed to see that it was a key mistake. Better was:}
( 33…g4 34.R6f2 Rd8 35.g3 hxg3 36.hxg3 Bg6 {And Anand is fine.} )

Moving the rook to "d8" looks so good that Anand failed to see that it was a key mistake.

Moving the rook to “d8” looks so good that Anand failed to see that it was a key mistake.

34.R1f2 {Carlsen takes away Anand’s chances of gaining “the seventh.”}
Rd4 {Anand considers this his “decisive mistake” and believes he should have played
Rg8 instead. It is worth noting that the computers disagree with his opinion of
this move being a mistake, so it is likely that Anand did not quite know where he lost the game.}
35.Rh6 {Carlsen is playing with purpose.}

Bd1

36.Bb1 {!} {Trading bishops here would have resulted in another draw. Play would have followed something like:}
( 36.Bxd1 Rxd1 37.Rg6 Kd6 38.Rg7 Rd3 39.Ka2 Rd4 40.Re2 Re5 41.Kb2
Rdxe4 42.Rxe4 Rxe4 43.Rxg5 )

Rb5

37.Kc3 {Here comes the king again.}
c5

38.Rb2 e5 39.Rg6 a4 {?} {Anand should have discovered this:}
( 39…g4 40.Bd3 Rxb3+ 41.Rxb3 Bxb3 42.Rxg4 c4 43.Be2 Kd6 {Is an easy draw.}
)

Anand misses an easier way to draw.

Anand misses an easier way to draw.

40.Rxg5 Rxb3+ 41.Rxb3 Bxb3 42.Rxe5+ Kd6 43.Rh5 Rd1 44.e5+ Kd5
45.Bh7 {Carlsen is obviously planning Bishop to g8+.}

Rc1+ {??}{Anand is not looking his best today.} ( 45…Ra1 46.Bg8+ Kc6
47.Bxb3 Rxa3 {and Anand is fine.} )

Anand is not looking his best today.

Anand is not looking his best today.

46.Kb2 Rg1 47.Bg8+ Kc6 48.Rh6+
Kd7 49.Bxb3 axb3 50.Kxb3 Rxg2 51.Rxh4 {Three passed pawns against one is not good odds for Anand.}
Ke6

52.a4 Kxe5 53.a5 Kd6 54.Rh7 {Carlsen is using good technique but we would not expect otherwise.}
Kd5 55.a6 c4+ 56.Kc3 Ra2 57.a7 Kc5 58.h4 {Viswanathan Anand resigns.} 1-0

Round 1 analysis

Round 2 analysis

Round 3 analysis

Round 4 analysis


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