Posts Tagged ‘fide world chess championship 2013’

World Chess Championship 2013: Anand Stops the Bleeding in Round 7

November 20, 2013
Anand managed to stop the bleeding in round 7. (phot courtesy of TheColor.com)

Anand managed to stop the bleeding in round 7. (phot courtesy of TheColor.com)

 

After two difficult losses in game 5 and game 6, Viswanathan Anand was able to regain his form and create a draw in round 7. To his fans, this was seen as a disappointing result. Anand’s many critics seem unable to comprehend that, “Sometimes, in order to win the war, you must first stop the bleeding.”

Below are my notes on round 7:

 

[Event “World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Chennai”]
[Date “2013.11.18”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Magnus Carlsen”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[Eco “C65”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 {Another Ruy Lopez, Berlin. If you are a regular reader of my blog you may just have a new line in your repertoir.}

The Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

The Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

4.d3 Bc5 5.Bxc6 {Anand has castled here in the past.}

( 5.O-O Nd4 6.Nxd4 Bxd4 7.c3 Bb6 8.Nd2 c6 9.Ba4 O-O 10.Nc4 Bc7
11.Ne3 d5 12.Qf3 d4 13.cxd4 Qxd4 14.Bc2 Be6 15.Rd1 Bb6 16.h3
Rad8 17.Bb3 Bxb3 18.axb3 Qb4 19.Nc4 Nd7 20.Bd2 Qxb3 21.Bc3 Bc5
22.Nxe5 Nxe5 23.Bxe5 Bd4 24.Bxd4 Rxd4 {…1/2-1/2, Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2817 – Kramnik Vladimir (RUS) 2781 , Moscow 9/ 2/2011 Memorial M.Botvinnik (active)}
)

dxc6

6.Nbd2 {“I chose a line that both of us had played quite a bit in the past. 6.Nbd2.”-Viswanathan Anand}
Bg4 {“He went for Bg4 instead. Then you get a slow kind of manoeuvring game after
the next three moves. White has two plans, which is, one is to play f4 and the
other like in the game which is to play on the h-file.”-Viswanathan Anand Perhaps Anand was hoping for one of these lines:}
( 6…Be6 7.O-O Bd6 8.b3 Nd7 9.Nc4 Bxc4 10.bxc4 O-O 11.Rb1 b6
12.g3 f5 13.exf5 Rxf5 14.Qe2 Nc5 15.Be3 Ne6 16.Nd2 Qf6 17.Qg4
Rf8 18.Ne4 Qf7 19.a4 h5 20.Qe2 Be7 21.a5 Qg6 22.axb6 axb6 23.Kh1
Rf3 24.Rbe1 Bb4 25.Ra1 Qg4 26.Qd1 {…1/2-1/2, Carlsen Magnus (NOR) 2843 – Aronian Levon (ARM) 2821 , Sao Paulo 9/28/2012 It “Final Masters” (cat.22)}
) ( 6…Nd7 7.O-O O-O 8.Nc4 Re8 9.Be3 Bxe3 10.fxe3 a5 11.a4 b6
12.Qe1 Ba6 13.Ncd2 Re6 14.Nh4 g6 15.Qg3 Qf8 16.Rf2 Qg7 17.Qh3
Rd8 18.g4 Rf6 19.Ndf3 Bc8 20.Kh1 Nc5 21.Qg3 Re8 22.b3 Re7 23.h3
Rd6 24.Kh2 h6 25.g5 h5 26.Nd2 {…1/2-1/2, Zvjaginsev Vadim (RUS) 2664 – Petrosian Tigran L (ARM) 2613 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club}
)

7.h3 {Nc4 was tried with success here.} ( 7.Nc4 Nd7 8.Be3 Bxe3
9.Nxe3 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 Qf6 11.Qxf6 Nxf6 12.Nc4 Nd7 13.O-O-O c5 14.Rdf1
Ke7 15.f4 f6 16.fxe5 fxe5 17.Ne3 Ke6 18.Nd5 Rac8 19.Rf5 c6 20.Ne3
Rcf8 21.Rhf1 g6 22.Rxf8 Rxf8 23.Rxf8 Nxf8 24.Kd2 Nd7 25.Ke2 Nf6
26.Kf3 b6 {…1-0, Libiszewski Fabien (FRA) 2509 – Michalczak Thomas (GER) 2320 , Reykjavik 3/11/2012 It (open)}
)

Bh5 {Magnus Carlsen’s move seems the most logical. If black captures he gets rid of
a good pin and helps white develop. Below is a game where white won after the bishop captures on f3:}
( 7…Bxf3 8.Qxf3 Nd7 9.Qg3 Qf6 10.Nc4 O-O 11.O-O Rfe8 12.a4
Nf8 13.Bg5 Qe6 14.Bd2 Ng6 15.b4 Bf8 16.Qg4 b6 17.g3 f6 18.Bc3
Bd6 19.Ne3 Kh8 20.Kg2 a6 21.Qf3 Ne7 22.h4 b5 23.Rfb1 Qd7 24.h5
h6 25.Qg4 Qxg4 26.Nxg4 Nc8 27.Bd2 {…1-0, Adams Michael (ENG) 2724 – Fressinet Laurent (FRA) 2693 , Germany 3/17/2012 Bundesliga 2011/12}
)

8.Nf1 {This is an innovation that has never been played at a high level before.
Amazing that on move 8, Anand introduces a new move to the world.}

By placing his knight on f1, Anand played an early innovation in the Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

By placing his knight on f1, Anand played an early innovation in the Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence.

Nd7

9.Ng3 {Viswanathan Anand faced a lot of criticism for his play in this game and the
match. I, for one, enjoy the fact that he has given white a new knight placement in the oldest of chess openings.}
Bxf3 10.Qxf3 {Anand has better development and a better pawn structure.}
g6 {Magnus Carlsen plays a slow move but one that takes key squares away from Anand’s knight.}
11.Be3 Qe7 12.O-O-O O-O-O 13.Ne2 {So far the only result from Anand’s new knight placement was causing black to
play g6. Since the knight has no future on g3, Anand will attempt to find a better location to justify his earlier innovation.}

Carlsen's pawn to g6 seems to have shut down Anand's earlier innovation.

Carlsen’s pawn to g6 seems to have shut down Anand’s earlier innovation.

Rhe8 {Other than his knight on d7, Magnus Carlsen has pretty good piece placement.}
14.Kb1 {Anand takes a moment to improve king safety a little. However, Carlsen wasn’t
threatening anything in particular. This is where his fans would like to see
him be a little more aggressive. Perhaps something like this:}
( 14.g4 Qe6 15.Kb1 Kb8 16.Bxc5 Nxc5 17.Qe3 b6 18.Rhf1 f5 19.exf5
gxf5 20.d4 {and white has a small advantage in a complex situation.} )
b6 {This move doesn’t look right. However, if the “Mozart of Chess” thinks his king should be on b7, who am I to argue?}
15.h4 {Anand honestly thought this would put pressure on his opponent.}

Anand's h-pawn embarks on a senseless expedition.

Anand’s h-pawn embarks on a senseless expedition.

Kb7

16.h5 {I really see no reason to believe that this plan should cause black any problems.}
Bxe3

17.Qxe3 {Anand is playing simply to stop the bleeding from his last two losses. If he
had been playing for a win, Anand would have taken with the f-pawn.}
Nc5

18.hxg6 hxg6 19.g3 {Viswanathan Anand just wants a draw to break his losing streak.}
a5 {!?} {Magnus Carlsen signals that he is willing to try and make it three wins in a
row. Safer and should I say more proper would be to challenge Anand for the h-file by playing rook to h8.}
20.Rh7 Rh8 21.Rdh1 Rxh7 22.Rxh7 Qf6 23.f4 Rh8 24.Rxh8 Qxh8 {With the rooks off the board, the drawing chances are much higher. Anand must not blunder and then he will have achieved his unstated goal of a draw.}

If Anand can avoid blundering, he can achieve his draw.

If Anand can avoid blundering, he can achieve his draw.

25.fxe5 Qxe5 26.Qf3 f5 {Now Anand can trade away his pawn center as Carlsen allows Anand’s queen to become an equal to his own. ;-)}
27.exf5 gxf5 28.c3 {There is a 0% chance that Carlsen would allow Anand to fork his knight and queen with pawn to d4.}
Ne6 29.Kc2 Ng5 30.Qf2 Ne6 31.Qf3 Ng5 32.Qf2 Ne6 {The game is drawn by the threat of repitition. Magnus Carlsen showed a lot of maturity in this game while Anand showed very little fight.} 1/2-1/2

 

Fide World Chess Championship 2013:

Game 1 Analysis

Game 2 Analysis

Game 3 Analysis

Game 4 Analysis

Game 5 Analysis

Game 6 Analysis

 

 

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World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 3 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

November 4, 2013

In our third preview game of the 2013 World Chess Championship Match between Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen, we are going to examine a stunning defeat of Anand at the hands of the cunning Russian chess player, Alexander Morozevich. In my humble opinion, this game clearly illustrates what is perhaps the best strategy for Magnus Carlsen in his upcoming match with Anand. Put simply, Magnus Carlsen needs to control his nerves and play dynamic attacking chess as much as possible. Below, Alexander Morozevich shows us how this is done:

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand's king safety.

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand’s king safety?

 

[Event “It ‘Kremlin Stars'”]

[Site “Moscow (Russia)”]

[Date “1995”]

[Round “2”]

[White “Morozevich, Alexander (RUS)”]

[Black “Anand, Viswanathan (IND)”]

[Result “1-0”]

[Eco “C33”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

 

1.e4 e5

2.f4 exf4

3.Bc4 Nf6 ( 3…Qh4+ 4.Kf1 d6 5.Nf3 Qh5 6.d4

g5 7.h4 Bg4 8.Nc3 Nc6 {Is how a more aggressive player might handle the black pieces.}

)

4.Nc3 c6 {This move takes a lot of the key squares away from white’s developed pieces and prepares a pawn thrust to “d5.”}

5.Bb3 d5

6.exd5 cxd5

7.d4 Bb4 {

At this point, objectively, black looks a little better. Both sides have one

center pawn and two developed pieces. Black does have an extra pawn and is

ready to castle. However, things can change very quickly in the King’s Gambit.}

8.Nf3 O-O

9.O-O Bxc3 {

A smart maneuver for Anand. His bishop was pinning white’s knight to just “air”

while exchanging creates a pawn weakness which can easily be attacked.}

10.bxc3 Qc7 {

Anand is still a little better than Morozevich. Both sides have two pieces

developed and a pawn in the center. Black momentarily has an extra pawn.}

11.Qe1 {I believe this is game represents the first time this idea has been tried.}

( 11.Qd3 b6 12.Ne5 Ba6 13.c4 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Bxc4 15.Nxc4 Nd5 16.Ne5

Nc6 17.Nxc6 Qxc6 18.Bxf4 Rac8 19.Qa3 Rfe8 20.Qf3 Nb4 21.Qxc6

Rxc6 22.Rae1 Rxe1 23.Rxe1 f6 24.Re8+ Kf7 25.Ra8 a5 26.Ra7+ Kg6

27.Rc7 Rxc2 28.Rxc2 Nxc2 29.Bc7 b5 30.d5 Kf7 {…0-1, Eberth Zoltan (HUN) 2198  – Vujosevic Vladimir (MNE) 2430 , Gyor 1997 It (open) “Nyar”}

) Nc6

12.Qh4 {Morozevich just wants to get Anand’s king. But isn’t that the real objective in chess?}

( 12.Ne5 Nxe5 13.Bxf4 Qc6 14.Bxe5 Ne4 15.Rf4 Be6 16.c4 dxc4 17.Qxe4

Qxe4 18.Rxe4 cxb3 19.axb3 Bf5 20.Re2 Rfe8 21.Rf2 Bg6 22.c4 a6

23.Bc7 Re3 24.d5 Rae8 25.Raf1 f6 26.Rf3 Kf7 27.Bb6 Rxf3 28.Rxf3

Ke7 29.Kf2 Kd7 30.Rg3 Rg8 31.Ke3 Re8+ {…1-0, Charbonneau Pascal (CAN) 2490  – Roussel-Roozmon Thomas (CAN) 2425 , Montreal  8/??/2004 It (cat.12)}

) Ne7

13.Bxf4 {Morozevich takes “f4” but will give Anand “c3.” Now who do you think is better? I would rather play with the white pieces.}

Qxc3

14.Bd2 {!?} {

Is this move brilliant or a mistake? Morozevich could have also played the more

natural looking “Bg5” or the “Qe1” retreat. However, Morozevich is not in the

mood to retreat and has a reputation for playing slightly outlandish moves.}

Qc7 {Anand retreats his queen to the most useful square he can find.}

15.Ne5 {Morozevich’s knight wastes no time finding its outpost.}

Nf5

16.Qf4 {The best choice for Morozevich but now his knight is pinned to an unattractive exchange of the queens.}

Be6 {Anand places his bishop on a bad square in order to unify his rooks.}

17.Bb4 {Forcing the rook from “f8” becomes important much later in the game.}

Rfc8

18.g4 {!} {It is now or never for Morozevich.}

Nd6

19.Rae1

{Morozevich has, more or less, all his pieces involved in the attack.}

Nfe4

20.c4 {!} {This move will eliminate the outpost for the black knight on “e4” as well as create more action for Morozevich’s light bishop.}

dxc4

21.Bc2 Nf6

22.g5 {!} {

When all your pieces are involved in the attack, sometimes it is up to the

pawns to create the final weaknesses in your enemy’s camp.}

Nh5{?} {Morozevich again proves that the best way to deal with Anand is to attack.

Viswanathan Anand should have played something like this:}

( 22…Nd5 23.Bxh7+ Kxh7 24.Qh4+ Kg8 25.Bxd6 Qxd6 26.g6 fxg6

27.Nxg6 Bf5 28.Qh8+ Kf7 29.Rxf5+ Nf6 30.Qh5 Qxd4+ )

23.Qf3 {!}

{Severe punishment is in store for Anand’s crime.}

g6

24.Nxg6{!} hxg6

25.Bxg6 {!} fxg6

26.Rxe6 Qf7

27.Qd5 {!} Nf5

28.Rxf5{!} {There is no defense for Anand now and he appropriately resigns.} 1-0


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