Posts Tagged ‘Fried Liver Attack’

So I was just playing a game of #Chess and then this happened… 5

July 7, 2018

Black to move and mate in 3.

Black to move and mate in 3.

 

 

The complete game is a rather nifty Traxler Counter Attack(Wilkes-Barre) that ended up checkmating white’s Fried Liver dreams in just 13 moves!

 

imb_aesbid

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The Fried Morra Attack

July 27, 2017

“Fried Morra” was served at our Southern California Summer Chess Camp!

 

Sometimes in chess themes from one opening can directly apply to another seemingly unrelated system. Below is a game in which I tried to play a Smith-Morra Gambit but after black plays an early e5 the game takes on a Fried Liver flavor. Caution should be used when blending these two spicy openings together as the resulting dish can be quite overpowering.

 

[Event “Summer Chess Camp”]
[Site “Glendale, California”]
[Date “2017.7.4”]
[Round “”]
[White “Chris Torres”]
[Black “Student”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “B32”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ SICILIAN def. Fried Morra var.]}

1.e4 c5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 cxd4

4.c3 {I do not recapture but instead steer the game into Smith-Morra Gambit territory(1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 Nc6 5.Bc4 e6 6.Nf3.)}

FriedMorra

Position after 4. c3.

4… e5 {?!} {My opponent declines capturing on c3 and thus my invitation to the Smith-Morra.}

5.Bc4 {With black’s pawn on e5 instead of e6 I am free to target the belly Button(f7) with my bishop.}

5… Nf6

6.Ng5 {I seize the opportunity to play a Fried Liver style attack.}

FriedMorra2

Position after 6. Ng5.

6… d5 {As in the Fried Liver Attack, black can not block the knight’s attack on f7 but can block the bishop with d5.}

7.exd5 Nxd5 {Black’s most solid choice is 7… Na5 and that also holds true at this junction in the Fried Liver.}

8.Nxf7! {Exposing black’s king and creating a new target out of the pinned knight on d5. }

FriedMorra3

Position after 8. Nxf7.

8… Kxf7

9.Qf3+ Ke6

10.O-O  Nce7 {?} {Either 10… Na5 or Be7 would have been better for black.}

( 10…Na5 11.Bd3 Nf6 12.cxd4 Qxd4 13.Nc3 Bd7 14.Bf5+ Kf7 15.Rd1 Bc6 16.Rxd4 Bxf3 17.Ra4 Nc6 18.gxf3 Nd4 19.Be4 Nxe4 20.fxe4 Bc5 21.Be3 Nc2 22.Rd1 Nxe3 23.fxe3 Bxe3+ 24.Kg2 Rhd8 25.Rc4 Bb6 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.Nd5 Rd7 28.b4 Bd4 29.a4
a6 30.b5 {…0-1, Vysochin Spartak (UKR) 2520 – Munoz Pantoja Miguel (PER) 2480 , Internet 4/ 4/2008 Dos Hermanas Internet Final})

( 10…Be7 11.cxd4 Nxd4 12.Qe4 b5 13.Re1 bxc4 14.Qxd4 Bf6 15.Qxc4
Qc7 16.Qd3 Bb7 17.Na3 Kf7 18.Bd2 Rad8 19.Rac1 Qd7 20.Qb3 Rhe8
21.Nb5 Re6 22.Ba5 Rc8 23.Rxc8 Qxc8 24.Bb4 Nxb4 25.Qxb4 Be7 26.Qb3
Qc5 27.h3 Bd5 28.Qd3 Bc4 29.Qf3+ Rf6 30.Qh5+ {…0-1, Fomina Tatyana (EST) 2214 – Azarova Nadezhda (BLR) 2308 , Beijing 10/15/2008 World Mindsports Games (Active Team w)})

FriedMorra4

Position after 10… Nce7?

11.Re1 {I would have also been doing well had I played 11. cxd4.}

( 11.cxd4 Kd7 ( 11…exd4 12.Rd1 b5 13.Bb3 Bb7 14.Rxd4 Nf5 15.Rd3 Bb4 16.g4 Nfe7 17.Bg5 ) 12.dxe5 Ke8 13.Bg5 )

11… Kd6

12.cxd4 exd4

13.Bf4+ {?} {Missing the correct square for the bishop by just one square has the potential to throw away all of white’s advantage.}

( 13.Bg5! h6 14.Rxe7 Nxe7 15.Qa3+ Kd7 16.Qa4+ Nc6 17.Bxd8 )

FriedMorra8

Position after 13. Bf4+?

13… Kc5 {??} {Deep Blue would have played 13…Nxf4 and been fine.}

( 13…Nxf4 14.Qxf4+ Kc6 15.Nc3 a6 16.Rad1 Qd6 17.Qe4+ Kb6 18.Rxd4 Qh6 )

FriedMorra5

Position after 13… Kc5??

14.Rc1 {I missed playing 14. Qa3+ which is objectively best as it is the first step in a mate in 9.}

( 14.Qa3+ Nb4 15.Re5+ Ned5 16.Rxd5+ Qxd5 17.Qa5+ Kxc4 18.Nd2+
Kd3 19.Qa3+ Kc2 20.Nf3 Nd3 21.Ne1+ Nxe1 22.Rc1# )

14… Nxf4

15.Bf7+ {!} {My choice for the best move of the game is this beautiful discovered check which places black’s king immediately into his death march.}

FriedMorra6

Position after 15. Bf7+.

15…Kb6

16.Qb3+ Ka5

17.Rc5+ b5

18.Qxb5# 1-0

FriedMorra7

Position after 18. Qxb5#

A Variation on a Theme by Morphy

June 22, 2012

Todays lesson examines the Morphy Variation of the Two Knights Defense (Fried Liver Attack.) Adi Kisieu is a talented young chess player from Oakland, California who, in this game, invented an interesting theoretical novelty on move 15 of a very frequently played opening. Unfortunately for his novelty, Adi used unfocused aggression and ended up giving his teacher a nice attack on the “g2” focal point. I am publishing this game in hopes that Adi’s “15. Nc3” is correctly attributed to him.

[Event “Chess Lesson”]

[Date “2012.06.21”]

[White “Kisieu, Adrian (Adi)”]

[Black “Torres, Chris”]

[Result “0-1”]

[ECO “C58”]

[Opening “Two Knights”]

[Variation “Morphy Variation”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {White tries for the Fried Liver Attack.} d5 {This is the most common defensive system.} 5. exd5 Na5 6. d3 {The Morphy Variation gets its name by being the favorite of Paul Morphy.} (6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Be2 h6 9. Nf3 e4 10. Ne5 Qd4 11. f4 Bc5 12. Rf1 Bb6 {Is another common continuation.}) 6. .. h6 7. Nf3 e4 {This is the best move and is rarely played in scholastic chess.} 8. Qe2 Nxc4 9. dxc4 Bc5 10. O-O O-O 11. Nfd2 (11. Ne5? Bd4 {and white’s mistake costs him a knight.}) 11. .. Bg4 12. Qe1 {White has a much better prospects for an endgame but black has better development right now.} Re8 13. Nb3 {This is a very nice move. I was expecting Nc3.} Qe7 {Black doesn’t want to trade but I was afraid of white playing h3 or c5.} 14. Nxc5 Qxc5 {So far our game is an exact copy of Stefanie Schultz vs Leonid Krugljakow, 2004.} 15. Nc3 {Adi Kisieu invents an interesting innovation. Adi is willing to give back a pawn on c4 in order to gain initiative and development.} Qxc4 16. b3 Qc5 17. Be3 {Adi develops with threats.} Qd6 18. Nb5 {A little too aggressive. The simple h3 keeps the initiative for white and is less of a commitment.} Qd7 19. Qa5 {Adi is being aggressive but lacks real purpose.} b6 20. Qa6 {Now that his queen and knight are tied up, I decide to have a go at Adi’s king.} Bf3 {“g2” is a nice focal point.} 21. gxf3 {In our game, I had calculated far enough to see if I win after this recapture by checkmate. To be honest, the line continued beyong where I could visualize.} exf3 22. Kh1 Qh3 23. Rg1 Rxe3 {It is all about analyzing checks, captures and threats.} (23. .. Ng4 24. Rxg4 Qxg4 25. Rg1 {and white survives.}) 24. fxe3 Ne4 {Threatening Nf2#.} 25. Raf1 f2 {Another easy threat to spot.} 26. Rg2 Ng3+ {Analyze checks first.} 27. Rxg3 Qxf1+ 28. Rg1 Qxg1# 0-1

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. d3 h6 7. Nf3 e4 8. Qe2 Nxc4 9. dxc4 Bc5 10. O-O O-O 11. Nfd2 11. Bg4 12. Qe1 Re8 13. Nb3 Qe7 14. Nxc5 Qxc5 15. Nc3 a new move by Adi Kisieu.

Fremont Chess Camp Miniature

August 31, 2010

Below is a fun example of the exciting chess played in Fremont, California.

[Event “Fremont Summer Chess Camp”]
[Site “Mission San Jose Elementary School”]
[Date “2010.06.30”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Zhao, Luke”]
[Black “Zhang, Joseph”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C57”]
[Opening “Two Knights”]
[Variation “Fritz Variation, Main Line”]
[Comment “An example of the exciting chess played in Fremont, California.”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {White tries
for a Fried Liver Attack.} d5 5. exd5 Nd4 {The tricky Fritz Variation.} 6.
d6 (6. c3 {I have played this variation on occasion.} b5 7. cxd4 bxc4 8.
dxe5 Qxd5 9. O-O Bb7) 6. .. Qxd6 7. Nxf7? {I like d3 here.} Qc6 8. Nxh8??
{White should not be so greedy.} Qxg2 9. Rf1 Qe4+ 10. Be2??? {The final
mistake.} Nf3# *

Fremont Second Grader Wins at 2010 National Elementary Chess Championship

May 22, 2010

Second grader Ojas Arun played a very nice game in round three at the 2010 Burt Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship. Ojas is another up and coming talent at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont, California. 

[Event “National Elementary Chess Championship”]
[Site “Atlanta, Georgia “]
[Date “2010.05.08”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Arun, Ojas”]
[Black “Paggart, Chandler”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C54”]

1. e4 {notes by Chris Torres} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {Trying for the Fried-Liver Attack} Bc5 {The wonderfully dangerous Wilkes-Barre variation.} 5. O-O {Ojas could have tried
5.Nxf7 or my favorite 5.Bxf7+. Instead he opted for the most conservative
route.} O-O 6. Nc3 h6 7. Nf3 d6 8. d3 Be6 9. Bxe6 {Taking here allows black
to have a happy rook on f8. However, I feel it is Ojas’ best move.} fxe6
10. Na4 {This is very professional . Knights on the rim are grim but Ojas’
knight can trade for black’s dark bishop.} Bb4? {This just allows c3 with
tempo.} 11. c3 Bc5 {Oh dear. Black should have played bishop a5. Now if
white plays the obvious 12.Qb3 black is in trouble.} {?!} 12. Nxe5 {This is
very tactical and I am impressed that Ojas spotted the move. However, if
black continues 12…Nxe5 13.d4 Ng6 14.dxc5 b5 he should be fine. Better
was simply playing the fork of 12.Qb3! Qc8 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.Qb5 and white is
clearly better.} Nxe5 13. d4 Neg4? {This mistakes fails to punish white’s
overly ambitious play. Now white is better.} 14. dxc5 d5 15. f3 b5? {This
is not very good as Ojas can play cxb6 en passent.} 16. fxg4? {Ojas
admitted he forgot about en passent.} bxa4 17. g5 {I would have played
17.exd5 Qxd5 18.Qxd5 Nxd5 19.Bd2 with a winnable endgame. Ojas chooses to
play the more tactical plan of exposing his opponent’s king.} Nxe4 18. gxh6
Rxf1+ 19. Qxf1 gxh6 20. Bxh6 Nxc5? {Qe7 would have been much better as
protecting the king is far more important than winning the pawn.} 21. Qf2?
{21.Qf4! Qe7 22.Qg4+ would have been much better and avoided any problems
with 21.Qf2 Ne4.} Nd3?? {This is a terrible mistake and allows Ojas to fork
the king and knight.} 22. Qd4 {I would have played Qg3+.} Qe7 23. Qxd3 Qf6
24. Qg3+ Kf7?? {Kh8 would have avoided dropping the queen.} 25. Rf1 {Game
over!} Qxf1+ 26. Kxf1 Rb8 27. Qxc7+? {27.Qg7 is a simple mate in three.}
Kg6 28. Qg7+ Kf5 29. Qg5+ Ke4 30. Qf4+? {30.Qg4 is a mate in two. Ojas
needs to work on closing out won games more accurately rather than
unintentionally torturing his opponent.} Kd3 31. Qd4+ {Ojas should just
take the rook. Perhaps his opponent would resign.} Kc2 32. Qd2+ Kb1 33.
Qd1+ Kxa2 34. Qxa4+ Kxb2 35. Qxa7 Rb3 36. Bg7 Kc2 37. Qa2+ Rb2 38. Qxb2+
Kxb2 39. h4 Kb3 40. h5 Kc4 41. h6 d4 42. cxd4 Kd5 43. h7 Ke4 44. h8=Q Kf5
45. Qh4 Kg6 46. Qf6+ Kh7 47. Bh8 Kg8 48. Qg7# 1-0

Summer Chess Camp

June 23, 2009

   Today was the start of the TCAMA Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont.  So far we have over 30 students signed up for this three week camp. The camp which runs from 9:00 am until 3:00 pm features instruction from TCAMA chess coaches Joe Lonsadale, Tans Hylkema, and Chris Torres. The format includes lectures, rated play and one on one analysis. Its nice to see so many students from the rival schools of Mission San Jose Elementary and Weibel coming together to increase their chess skills and create lasting friendships. Below is a game from day 1 with light analysis:

[Event “Summer Camp”]

[Site “MSJE”]

[Date “2009.06.22”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Arun, Sagar”]

[Black “Zhang, Joseph”]

[Result “0-1”]

[PlyCount “22”]

[TimeControl “g90”]

1. e4 e5 {notes by Chris Torres}  2. Nf3 Nc6  3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 {The Fried Liver Attack is always a popular choice!} 5. exd5 Nd4 {This line is exceptionally tricky. NCO recomends 6. c3 b5 7. Bf1 Nxd5 8. cxd4 Qxg5 9. Bb5+ Kd8 10. Qf3 Bb7 11. 0-0 Rb8 12. Qg3 Qxg3  } 6. d6 {an alternative worth studying} Qxd6  7. Nxf7 [White feel for a trap. Bxf7 is correct] Qc6 8. Nxh8 {perhaps 0-0?} Qxg2 {Such a beautiful attack from a young player. This move leaves white with no real chances.} 9. Bf1 Qe4+ 10. Be2 Nf3+ 11. Kf1 Bh3+ 0-1

 


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