Posts Tagged ‘Italian Game’

Hidden Gems Abound at the 2016 Chess Olympiads

September 4, 2016

One of my favorite hobbies is treasure hunting for beautifully instructive chess games during the annual Chess Olympiads. With more than 180 countries each sending their best male and female teams to compete in one event, the Chess Olympiads is a veritable mother load of chess gems. For hunting these chess treasures, I follow along at:

The official site for the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads

http://www1.bakuchessolympiad.com//

 

 

Chess Daily News

https://chessdailynews.com

 

ChessGames.com

http://www.chessgames.com/index.html

 

FM Qiu Zhou of Canada

FM Qiyu Zhou of Canada

And to illustrate just the kind of hidden gems I am talking about, I present Sindira Joshi (Nepal) vs. Qiyu Zhou (Canada) from round 1 of the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads. Enjoy…

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.2”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Joshi, Sindira”]
[Black “Zhou, Qiyu”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C54”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C54]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {The start to the Scotch.}

3… exd4

4.Bc4 Bc5

5.c3 {Transposing to a Giuoco Piano.}

5… Nf6

6.cxd4 Bb4+

7.Bd2 {White could have also chosen the equally popular Moeller Attack by playing Nc3 and gambitting the e-pawn.}

( 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 O-O 11.Rxe4 Ne7 12.d6
cxd6 13.Qxd6 Nf5 14.Qd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bxg5 16.Nxg5 Qxg5 17.Qxf7+
{1-0, Euwe Max (NED) – Van Mindeno A, Netherlands 1927 It “AVRO”} )

 

Position after 7. Bd2

Position after 7. Bd2

 

7… Nxe4

8.Bxb4 Nxb4

9.Bxf7+ Kxf7

10.Qb3+ d5 {Discovered by Gioachino Greco, this line is a mere 400 years old.}

 

Position after 10... d5

Position after 10… d5

 

11.Qxb4 {Greco preffered Ne5+ here.}

11… Rf8

12.Nc3 {So far so good for the much lower rated Sindira Joshi. Her chances are about equal here.}
( 12.O-O Ng5 13.Ne5+ Kg8 14.Nc3 c6 15.f4 Nf7 16.Ne2 Nd6 17.Ng3
a5 18.Qa3 a4 19.Qb4 a3 20.bxa3 Nb5 21.a4 Qd6 22.Rab1 Qxb4 23.Rxb4
Nc3 24.Rb3 Nxa4 25.Ne2 Ra6 26.g3 Nb6 27.Nc3 Na4 28.Ne2 Nb6 29.Nc3
Nc4 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Rb4 b5 {…1/2-1/2, Schaefer Markus (GER) 2390 – Postny Evgeny (ISR) 2595 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club})

12… Nxc3 13.bxc3 {?} {A slight innacuracy. Better was Qxc3 as seen in this game:}

( 13.Qxc3 Kg8 14.O-O Qd6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Rae1 Rae8 17.Re3 Re6 18.Rfe1
Ref6 19.b4 {1/2-1/2, Danilenko Dmitriy (UKR) 1992 – Pavlov Maxim (UKR) 2327 , Alushta 5/18/2006 Ch Ukraine (1/2 final)})

13… Kg8

14.Ne5 {?} {Another harmless looking mistake. Much better was h4 to prevent Qg5.}

 

Position after 14. Ne5

Position after 14. Ne5

 

14… Qg5 {Here comes trouble.}

15.g3 {?} {As dangerous as it looks, castling is to be preferred here.}

15… Rxf2 {!} {Qiyu Zhou starts her combination with a beautiful rook sacrifice.}

 

Position after 15.... Rxf2

Position after 15…. Rxf2

 

16.Kxf2 Qd2+

17.Kf3 Bh3 {Qiyu Zhou is putting on a tactical clinic.}

 

Position after 15... Bh3

Position after 15… Bh3

 

18.Rad1 {Sindira Joshi seems to be playing the most accurate responses but Qiyu Zhou continues to press her advantage.}

18… Bg2+

19.Kg4 Qe2+

20.Kh4 Bxh1 {Not just to win the exchange but also to set up a vicious fork.}

 

Position after 20... Bxh1

Position after 20… Bxh1

 

21.Rxh1 Qe4+ {and now Sindira Joshi’s only chance is to hope for a rare blunder from Qiyu Zhou.}

22.Kh3 Qxh1 {Qiyu Zhou concludes the prefectly executed 8 move combination.}

23.Qe7 {Sindira Joshi finally has a choice but it is to pick her own poison.}

( 23.Qxb7 Rf8 24.Qxc7 Qf1+ 25.Kh4 Qf6+ 26.Kh3 Qf5+ 27.g4 Qf1+
28.Kg3 Qf4+ 29.Kg2 g5 {seems very unpleasant for white.} ) {%09DB}

23… Qf1+ {Qiyu Zhou grabs the initiative again.}

 

Position after 23... Qf1+

Position after 23… Qf1+

 

24.Kh4 Qf6+ {Qiyu Zhou wisely choses to force an exchange of queens and head into a rook vs. knight endgame.}

25.Qxf6 gxf6

26.Nd7 Kf7

27.Nc5 b6

28.Nd3 Re8

29.Nf4 {Hats off to Sindira Joshi for continueing to play on and give us a chance to study good endgame technique.}

 

Position after 29. Nf4

Position after 29. Nf4

 

29… c6

30.Kg4 Re3

31.Kf5 {Nothing can be done to save white’s queenside pawns from a Qiyu Zhou’s rampaging rook.}

31… Rxc3

32.Nh5 Rc2

33.h4 Rxa2

34.Kf4 a5

35.Ke3 b5

36.Nf4 a4

37.Nd3 a3

38.Nb4 Rb2 {Sindira Joshi resigns as there is no hope left for white.} 0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nd4

June 12, 2010

Below is the infamous Blackburne Shilling Gambit.  The name of this variation in the Italian Game is utter nonsense do to the fact that Blackburne never played this line and it is not a gambit because white cannot take the pawn on e5 without losing material. Despite the terrible nomenclature, every student of chess should know this game.

 
[Site “Cologne”]
[Date “1912”]
[White “Muhlock”]
[Black “Kostics”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Italian Game”]
[Variation “Blackburne Shilling Gambit]
[PlyCount “14”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nd4 {This is the
Blackburne Shilling Gambit.} 4. Nxe5? {This mistake is what black is
hoping for. Better would be 4.0-0, 4.Nxd4, 4.c3 or even 4.d3. A rare line
is 4.0-0 b5 5.Bxf7+! White has an easy advantage with 4.c3 Nxc3 5. Qxc3 or
4.c3 Nc6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4. If white plays 4.Nxd4 exd4 5.c3 d5 6.exd5 Qe7+ 7.Kf1 he is also winning. It seems an injustice was done to Blackburne by naming 3…Nd4 after him.} Qg5 5. Nxf7?? {White needed to play 5.Bxf7+}
Qxg2 6. Rf1 Qxe4+ 7. Be2? {White chooses the quickest poison.} Nf3# 0-1

CalChess Grade Level Championship

November 22, 2009

This weekend I am enjoying my duties as a coach at the CalChess Grade Level Championship in Stockton. I will be posting tournament crosstables, games and photos both nights of the tournament. This blogger is extremely grateful that Calchess President Tom Langland performed the chief tournament director duties.

Below is a very instructional game played by  Srinath Goli (Mission San Jose Elementary School) who demonstrated to his opponent why masters prefer 4. c3 rather than 4. O-O in the  Italian Game. This game is a real gem and is the best performance I have seen from Srinath to date.

[Event “Grade Level Championship”]
[Site “Stockton”]
[Date “2009.11.21”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Li, Jack”]
[Black “Goli, Srinath”]
[Result “0-1”]
[PlyCount “84”]
[TimeControl “g60”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. d3 Bg4 7. Bg5 Nd4 8. Nd5 Nxf3+ 9. gxf3 Bh3 10. Re1 h6 11. Nxf6+ gxf6 12. Be3 Rg8+ 13. Kh1 Bg2+ 14. Kg1 Bxf3+ 15. Kf1 Bxd1 16. Raxd1 Bxe3 17. Rxe3 Qd7 18. b3 O-O-O 19. a4 f5 20. Bb5 Qe6 21. Bc4 Qf6 22. Rf3 f4 23. b4 Qh4 24. Bxf7 Rg7 25. Be6+ Kb8 26. Rh3 Qf6 27. Bf5
Rdg8 28. Ke2 Rg1 29. Rxg1 Rxg 30. f3 a6 31. Kf2 Rg5 32. c4 h5 33. b5 axb5 34. axb5 h4 35. Rxh4 Ka7 36. Rh3 Rxf5 37. exf5 Qxf5 38. Kg2 Qxd3 39. Rh8 Qxc4 40. h4 Qxb5 41. Kh3 Qd7+ 42. Kg2 Qg7+ 0-1


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