Posts Tagged ‘Jerome Gambit’

More Useful Junk

December 16, 2015

It’s nice to have friends who appreciate fun chess. Rick Kennedy  recently featured one of my swashbuckling victories on his blog about the Jerome Gambit.

Readers of this blog probably remember Chris Torres. He hosts the Chess Musings blog. He presented the Jerome gambit game Amateur – Blackburne, London as “The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!” He followed up with “Another Lesson in the Jerome Gambit”, giving one of his own games….

Read the full article via http://ift.tt/1mmHq4w

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Useful Junk: The Jerome Gambit

January 2, 2013

Below is another interesting game where I played the Jerome Gambit against my student, Iddo Zohar. The Jerome Gambit is an unsound specialty of mine which I like to categorize as “useful junk.” Iddo Zohar is a very talented junior chess player who you will definitely here more about in future posts.

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Bxf7+ {This is the Jerome Gambit.}

 

The Jerome Gambit

The Jerome Gambit

4…Kxf7

5. Nxe5+ Nxe5 {White is two pieces down but can get one back for sure.} 6.

Qh5+ Ng6 7. Qd5+ {Its better to delay the capture of the bishop for one

move.} Kf8 8. Qxc5+ d6 9. Qe3 Nf6 10. Nc3 Kf7 {Black wants to get his rook

on e8.} 11. d4 Re8 12. O-O {White is down material but controls the center

and has better king safety.} d5 13. f3 {This maintains a pawn grip on the

center and hurts the influence of the knight on f6.} c6 14. e5 Nd7

 

Position after 14...Nd7.

Position after 14…Nd7.

15. Ne4!? {15. f4 would have given white plenty of compensation for his

material disadvantage.} dxe4 16. Qb3+ Kf8 17. fxe4+ Nf6 {This was black’s

best move but it allows white to regain a piece when he chooses.} 18. Be3

Be6 19. Qxb7 Rb8 20. Qxc6 Rxb2 {I definately prefer white here. However,

the position is roughly even.} 21. exf6 gxf6? {Black needed to play Qc8.}

22. d5! {White’s superior pawn center provides the winning advantage.}

22. d5!

22. d5!

22…Bd7 23. Rxf6+ {It’s all about tactics now.} Kg7 24. Rxg6+! hxg6 25. Qc3+ Kh7

26. Qxb2 Rxe4 27. Bf2 Bf5 28. Qb3 Qh8 29. Rd1 Rg4 30. Qh3+ {White has a

winning endgame so it is time to end black’s attack and trade.} Kg8 31.

Qxh8+ Kxh8 32. d6 Rb4 33. Bxa7 Rb2? 34. Bd4+ {After this fork, black

resigns.} 1-0

To learn more on the Jerome Gambit you should visit my friend’s Jerome Gambit blog.

Another Lesson in the Jerome Gambit

June 9, 2010

I received so much positive feedback after I presented “The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!” that I decided to provide my readers with another Jerome Gambit lesson.  If you are intrigued by the Jerome Gambit I suggest you visit Rick Kennedy’s web page on the gambit here: http://jeromegambit.blogspot.com/ 

Have fun and study at your own risk!

[Event “lesson”]
[Site “Cupertino”]
[Date “2009.05.05”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Torres, Chris”]
[Black “Zhang, Lunxi”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Jerome Gambit”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Bxf7+ {The questionable and dangerous
Jerome Gambit.} Kxf7 5. Nxe5+ Nxe5 6. Qh5+ Kf8 {This move and Ke6 are both
known to be strong replies and leave black in a technically better but very
dangerous situation.} 7. Qxe5 d6 8. Qg3 {I avoid playing Qf4 as black can
reply Qf6 and suggest a trade of queens or gain a strong attack if I try
9.Qg3 h5!} Nf6 9. O-O Nxe4 10. Qf4+ Nf6 11. b4 {From this position I have
always won.} Bb6 12. Bb2 Bd7 13. Nc3 Bc6? {This move looks strong at first
but black forgot about white’s “b” pawn.} 14. b5! {Black is forced to
retreat and loose time.} Bd7 15. Ne4 Kf7 16. Rae1 {The gambiteer must keep
developing with purpose.} Bxb5? {A tempting mistake. Rf8 would have been
much better.} 17. Bxf6! {The rook on f1 is of no concern as it is my only
piece not involved in attacking black’s king.} gxf6 18. Ng5+ {This is how a
professional uses tactics.} Kg6? {Kg8 would be better.} 19. Ne6 Qd7??
{Black needs to play Qg8 and defend perfectly.} 20. Qg3+ Kh6 21. Qh3+? {I
missed an easy mate in 6 starting with Re4.} Kg6 22. Qg4+ Kh6 23. Qf5 Qf7
24. Re4! {I finally spot the winner.} Bd7 25. Rh4+ Qh5 26. Rxh5# 1-0

The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!

May 8, 2009

This fantastic game from 1880 is perhaps the most violent chess game ever played.

[Event "Jerome Gambit"]
[Site "England"]
[Date "1880.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "Joseph Henry Blackburne"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "28"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.Bxf7+
Kxf7 5.Nxe5+ Nxe5 6.Qh5+
{Note - d4 also regains a piece and deserves attention}
 g6 7.Qxe5 d6 8.Qxh8
Qh4 9.O-O Nf6 10.c3{Note - This is too slow as it does not stop Ng4.
 White should have tried Qd8
pinning the knight on f6.} Ng4 11.h3 Bxf2+ 12.Kh1 Bf5 13.Qxa8 Qxh3+
14.gxh3 Bxe4# 0-1

notes by Chris Torres

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