Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Moy’

World Youth Chess Championships 2012: Round 3 Preview

November 10, 2012

California’s top young chess stars are once again proving that the kids in the Golden State play world-class chess. Several remain undefeated and nearly all remain in contention for the gold after the first two rounds of the World Youth Chess Championships. Round 3 has some interesting match-ups. Here are the games to keep an eye on:

U8 Open

Board 18   Milind Maiti(California) vs  Mohan Kushagra

Board 34   Joaquin Perkins(California) vs Alexander Akhmetshin

Board 35   Andrea Becchi vs Ben Rood(California)

U12 Open

Board 1   Samuel Sevian(California) vs Timur Trubchaninov

Board 23  Martin Bergsjo  Ostby vs Kevin Moy(California)

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Chess Players in Fremont, California are the Best in the United States

May 16, 2012

Two Schools in Fremont, California won National Championships at the recent United States Chess Federation’s National Elementary (k-6) Championships in Nashville, Tennessee.  Both Mission San Jose Elementary School and Weibel Elementary School have reputations of excellence in chess due to being the dominate teams at both state and national events. After their incredible results at the 2012 National Elementary (k-6) Championships, both teams seem determined to put Fremont, California on the map for being the city with the strongest scholastic chess clubs in the United States.

It was not an easy path for Weibel Elementary School at the 2012 National Elementary Chess Championships. In order to clinch the k-6 national championship, Weibel had to make a stunning comeback after being in fifth place with just one round to go.  Head Coach Alan Kirshner informed his team that the only chance they had to win the national title was if all four members won their final round games. Team members Kevin Moy(National Chess Champion), Michael Wang, Anthony Zhou and Steven Li answered his call and did just that. In doing so, Weibel became the second school from California ever to win the National Elementary k-6 chess championship. The first school to do this, in 2009, was their rival Mission San Jose Elementary School.

Winning first place team chess trophies is a regular occurrence at Mission San Jose Elementary School. Having taken all the Team State Championship trophies possible at the Calchess State Championships, Mission San Jose Elementary headed out to Nashville Tennessee with another National Championship in mind. Head coach Joe Lonsdale knew his kids’ chances were good of bringing home another national championship but also was acutely aware of the many other strong teams present at the National Elementary Chess Championships. At the end of the weekend, his youngest players in the k-1 championship section proved themselves to be the big heroes of the chess club. Rishith Susarla won six of seven games and tied for third place.  Rishith took home the fourth place trophy.  Edwin Thomas won scored 5.5 points (five wins and a draw) and tied for 15th place.  Amulya Harish, Annapoorni Meiyappan, and Kevin Pan each scored four points. By winning the k-1 national chess championship for the school, these young MSJE players have signaled to the other scholastic chess teams in California that Mission San Jose Elementary School’s supreme dynasty is likely to continue for years to come.

It is worth noting that players from both schools regularly attend camps and classes put on by the Torres Chess and Music Academy. For more information on our summer chess camps please visit www.FremontChess.com

Calchess State Grade Level Championship: Eric Zhu Remains Undefeated

December 5, 2010

Fifth grader Eric Zhu remains undefeated after nearly conquering Kevin Moy and reaching a draw by agreement. Eric Zhu attends Mission San Jose Elementary and with this draw brings our team ever closer to another championship.

[Event “Calchess State Grade Level Championship”]
[Site “Stockton”]
[Date “2010.12.05“]
[Round “3”]
[White “Zhu, Eric”]
[Black “Moy, Kevin”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]

1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. d4 d5 4. Bd3 Nc6 5. Be3 e6 6. c3 bxc3 7. Nxc3 Bb4 8. Qc2 Qa5 9. Rc1 Nge7 10. Ne2 Bxc3+ 11. Nxc3 a6 12. O-O Nb4 13. Qd2 Nxd3 14. Qxd3 O-O 15. e5 b5 16. f4 Nf5 17. Rf3 Bb7 18. Rcf1 Rac8 19. Bd2 Rc4 20. Ne2 Qxa2 21. g4 Ne7 22. Rh3 g6 23. Qe3 Qc2 24. f5 Qe4 25. Qh6 Qxg4+ 26. Ng3 Qxd4+ 27. Kh1 Rfc8 28. Qxh7+ Kf8 *


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