Posts Tagged ‘Norway chess’

Tromso 2014: Hikaru Nakamura Raises a Stink About Toilettes

August 7, 2014

As if on cue, Hikaru Nakamura waited until after the Kramnik – Topalov match to publicly blast the organizers of the 41st Chess Olympiad in Tromso, Norway on the restroom conditions at the chess venue. One would think the American Grandmaster would be used to win – loos situations at chess tournaments. Then again, this is supposed to be a chess tournament for elite players… not a game of thrones.

Below is the tweet concerning Toiletgate 2014:

@GMHikaru: One favor for all future Olympiads; can we please have real toilets and not portable toilets?? This is absolutely disgusting!

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GM Karsten Müller Breaks Down Endgames from Carlsen, Karjakin and Aronian

June 21, 2014

Today is the perfect day to learn from the chess games of Norway Chess 2014. GM Karsten Müller examines three key games of Karjakin, Carlsen, Aronian and Agdestein for your learning pleasure.

Why You Should Care About the Upcoming World Chess Championship Match

November 6, 2013
FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2013

FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2013

On November 9, 2013 the world is going to stop. Billions of people around the globe will be watching live as two titans clash in what may be the greatest chess match ever played. Viswanathan Anand, the Pride of India, will be taking on the charismatic “Mozart of Chess,” Magnus Carlsen.  By the end of November, the player who utterly destroys his opponent will be crowned “The King of Chess.”

Viswanathan Anand at the chess board.

Viswanathan Anand at the chess board.

Viswanathan Anand is more than a World Chess Champion. He is the greatest sportsmen ever produced from the second most populous country in the world. “Vishy,” as his friends call him, became India’s first grandmaster in 1988. Anand was also first to receive the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award in 1992. In 2007, he was awarded the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian honor. Viswanathan Anand has also won the coveted Chess Oscar a total of six times! Indeed, historians tell us that chess has its roots in ancient India, but it was not until Viswanathan Anand became World Champion that chess took a hold of the sub-continent’s imagination.

The charismatic "Mozart of Chess."

The charismatic “Mozart of Chess.”

Many consider Magnus Carlsen to be for chess, what Mozart was for music. In the long and distinguished history of chess prodigies, Magnus may be the greatest of them all. Magnus Carlsen, who started chess at the age of five, became a chess Grand Master at thirteen and the number one rated player in the world before the age of twenty. A short while later, Carlsen established the highest rating ever in the game of chess and in doing so surpassed his former teacher, Garry Kasparov. Often mentioned in the same class as Paul Morphy, Jose Raul Capablanca and Bobby Fischer, Magnus is missing only the title of World Champion to establish his residency on Mount Olympus.

Throughout human history, there have been certain events which demonstrate the greatness of human achievement. The Hammurabi Code of 1750 B.C., the dawn of Democracy in 594 B.C., The Wright Brothers taking flight in 1903 are important events on the timeline comparable to what, I believe, will result from the FIDE World Chess Championship of 2013. Chess is about to become “cool” again and our world may never be the same.

Don’t miss the event:

The Official Site for the Anand-Carlsen World Chess Championship Match of 2013

Watch live on you Android device.

Watch live on your iphone or ipad.

Get Norway’s perspective on the Anand-Carlsen World Chess Championship Match of 2013

See what India feels about Anand’s play against Carlsen.

Blogs covering the 2013 World Chess Championship:

World Chess Championship Blog

Susan Polgar’s Blog

Alexandra Kosteniuk’s Blog

Chris Torres’ Blog

Chessdom

 

World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 3 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

November 4, 2013

In our third preview game of the 2013 World Chess Championship Match between Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen, we are going to examine a stunning defeat of Anand at the hands of the cunning Russian chess player, Alexander Morozevich. In my humble opinion, this game clearly illustrates what is perhaps the best strategy for Magnus Carlsen in his upcoming match with Anand. Put simply, Magnus Carlsen needs to control his nerves and play dynamic attacking chess as much as possible. Below, Alexander Morozevich shows us how this is done:

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand's king safety.

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand’s king safety?

 

[Event “It ‘Kremlin Stars'”]

[Site “Moscow (Russia)”]

[Date “1995”]

[Round “2”]

[White “Morozevich, Alexander (RUS)”]

[Black “Anand, Viswanathan (IND)”]

[Result “1-0”]

[Eco “C33”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

 

1.e4 e5

2.f4 exf4

3.Bc4 Nf6 ( 3…Qh4+ 4.Kf1 d6 5.Nf3 Qh5 6.d4

g5 7.h4 Bg4 8.Nc3 Nc6 {Is how a more aggressive player might handle the black pieces.}

)

4.Nc3 c6 {This move takes a lot of the key squares away from white’s developed pieces and prepares a pawn thrust to “d5.”}

5.Bb3 d5

6.exd5 cxd5

7.d4 Bb4 {

At this point, objectively, black looks a little better. Both sides have one

center pawn and two developed pieces. Black does have an extra pawn and is

ready to castle. However, things can change very quickly in the King’s Gambit.}

8.Nf3 O-O

9.O-O Bxc3 {

A smart maneuver for Anand. His bishop was pinning white’s knight to just “air”

while exchanging creates a pawn weakness which can easily be attacked.}

10.bxc3 Qc7 {

Anand is still a little better than Morozevich. Both sides have two pieces

developed and a pawn in the center. Black momentarily has an extra pawn.}

11.Qe1 {I believe this is game represents the first time this idea has been tried.}

( 11.Qd3 b6 12.Ne5 Ba6 13.c4 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Bxc4 15.Nxc4 Nd5 16.Ne5

Nc6 17.Nxc6 Qxc6 18.Bxf4 Rac8 19.Qa3 Rfe8 20.Qf3 Nb4 21.Qxc6

Rxc6 22.Rae1 Rxe1 23.Rxe1 f6 24.Re8+ Kf7 25.Ra8 a5 26.Ra7+ Kg6

27.Rc7 Rxc2 28.Rxc2 Nxc2 29.Bc7 b5 30.d5 Kf7 {…0-1, Eberth Zoltan (HUN) 2198  – Vujosevic Vladimir (MNE) 2430 , Gyor 1997 It (open) “Nyar”}

) Nc6

12.Qh4 {Morozevich just wants to get Anand’s king. But isn’t that the real objective in chess?}

( 12.Ne5 Nxe5 13.Bxf4 Qc6 14.Bxe5 Ne4 15.Rf4 Be6 16.c4 dxc4 17.Qxe4

Qxe4 18.Rxe4 cxb3 19.axb3 Bf5 20.Re2 Rfe8 21.Rf2 Bg6 22.c4 a6

23.Bc7 Re3 24.d5 Rae8 25.Raf1 f6 26.Rf3 Kf7 27.Bb6 Rxf3 28.Rxf3

Ke7 29.Kf2 Kd7 30.Rg3 Rg8 31.Ke3 Re8+ {…1-0, Charbonneau Pascal (CAN) 2490  – Roussel-Roozmon Thomas (CAN) 2425 , Montreal  8/??/2004 It (cat.12)}

) Ne7

13.Bxf4 {Morozevich takes “f4” but will give Anand “c3.” Now who do you think is better? I would rather play with the white pieces.}

Qxc3

14.Bd2 {!?} {

Is this move brilliant or a mistake? Morozevich could have also played the more

natural looking “Bg5” or the “Qe1” retreat. However, Morozevich is not in the

mood to retreat and has a reputation for playing slightly outlandish moves.}

Qc7 {Anand retreats his queen to the most useful square he can find.}

15.Ne5 {Morozevich’s knight wastes no time finding its outpost.}

Nf5

16.Qf4 {The best choice for Morozevich but now his knight is pinned to an unattractive exchange of the queens.}

Be6 {Anand places his bishop on a bad square in order to unify his rooks.}

17.Bb4 {Forcing the rook from “f8” becomes important much later in the game.}

Rfc8

18.g4 {!} {It is now or never for Morozevich.}

Nd6

19.Rae1

{Morozevich has, more or less, all his pieces involved in the attack.}

Nfe4

20.c4 {!} {This move will eliminate the outpost for the black knight on “e4” as well as create more action for Morozevich’s light bishop.}

dxc4

21.Bc2 Nf6

22.g5 {!} {

When all your pieces are involved in the attack, sometimes it is up to the

pawns to create the final weaknesses in your enemy’s camp.}

Nh5{?} {Morozevich again proves that the best way to deal with Anand is to attack.

Viswanathan Anand should have played something like this:}

( 22…Nd5 23.Bxh7+ Kxh7 24.Qh4+ Kg8 25.Bxd6 Qxd6 26.g6 fxg6

27.Nxg6 Bf5 28.Qh8+ Kf7 29.Rxf5+ Nf6 30.Qh5 Qxd4+ )

23.Qf3 {!}

{Severe punishment is in store for Anand’s crime.}

g6

24.Nxg6{!} hxg6

25.Bxg6 {!} fxg6

26.Rxe6 Qf7

27.Qd5 {!} Nf5

28.Rxf5{!} {There is no defense for Anand now and he appropriately resigns.} 1-0


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