Posts Tagged ‘perfect chess’

Perfect Game at the National Elementary Chess Championship

June 10, 2010

Luke Zhao, a first grader from Fremont, played a perfect chess game at the 2010 Bert Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship in Atlanta, Georgia. Below is his game with notes by his chess coach Chris Torres.

[Event “Bert Lerner National Elementary Chess Championship”]
[Site “Atlanta, Georgia”]
[Date “2010.05.08”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Jha, Kubair”]
[Black “Zhao, Luke”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C50”]
[Opening “Giuoco Pianissimo”]
[Variation “Canal, 6…h6”]

1. e4 {Notes by Chris Torres.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 {The Four Knights
Opening is frequently seen at scholastic chess tournaments.} 4. Bc4 {This
bishop is better placed on b5 to prevent the “Fork Trick” which continues
4… Nxe4! 5. Nxe4 d5. Black regains the sacrificed piece and maintains a
center pawn.} Bc5 {Luke chooses not to play the fork trick and instead
bring on an Italian Four Knights.} 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bxf6
Qxf6 9. Qd2? {This is a mistake. White should have taken the opportunity to
play Nd5 which forces the black queen to retreat to d8.} Bg4! {Black
threatens to capture on f3 and expose white’s king.} 10. Qe2?? {This move
is a disaster. Better would have been Nd5.} Nd4 11. Qd1?? {Rybka finds:
-1.40 11. Nxd4! Bxe2 12. Nxe2 Qg5 13. Bb3 Bb6 14. Rb1 c5 15. Nd1 Kh7.
Surprisingly white is still fighting after dropping the queen.} Nxf3+!
{Luke Zhao will now punish his opponent’s inaccuracies with perfect
tactics.} 12. gxf3 Bxf3 13. Qd2??? {White has to play Ne2 if he wants to
stay alive longer.} Qg6+ 14. Qg5 Qxg5# {Luke Zhao played yet another error
free game. This is a beautiful example of a first grader playing brilliant
chess.} 0-1


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