Posts Tagged ‘Peter Leko’

Tal Memorial: Anand vs. Leko

November 11, 2009

One of the strongest chess tournaments ever assembled moved to Russia’s Red Square today. Viswanathan Anand demonstrated to the world that he is not satisfied to “rest on his laurels” but is willing to use whatever means necessary to defeat his challengers at the Tal Memorial. The first 21 moves are considered book.  It is very difficult to tell exactly where Leko went wrong and how Anand’s 30.h3 clinched the victory.  Please enjoy our current World Chess Champion at his finest.

[Date “2009.11.10”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “5”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Peter Leko”]
[ECO “D43”]
[WhiteElo “2788”]
[BlackElo “2752”]
[PlyCount “90”]

1. d4 d5{notes by Chris Torres} 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8.
Bg3 b5 9. Be2 Bb7 10. O-O Nbd7 11. Ne5 Bg7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bd6 a6 14. a4
e5 15. Bg4 exd4 16. e5 c5 17. Re1 Nxe5 18. Bxe5 O-O 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Ne2
f5 21. Bh5 f4 22. Nxd4{a rarely played idea invented by Kasimdzhanov} cxd4 23. Re6 Bc8{23…Bc8 seems to be good enough to draw. Rf6 is the alternative which could lead to 24.Qe1  Rxe6  25.Qxe6  Qc7  26.Re1  d3  27.Re5  d2  28.Rf5  d1Q+  29.Bxd1  Rf8  30.Rxf8  Kxf8 which is complicated but equal} 24. Rg6+ Kh7 25. axb5 Rf6 26. Rxf6
Qxf6 27. Qc2+ Bf5 28. Qxc4 Rc8 29. Qd5 axb5 30. h3{The little move which changes it all. All of a sudden Anand is winning.}  Kh8{Rc7 is an alternative. However… if Anand continues 31.Ra8  Be6  32.Qd6 31. Qxb5 Rf8 32. Ra6 Rd7  33.Qc6  Re7  34.Ra6  d3  35.Qd6  Kg7  36.Bg4  d2  37.Qxd2 he will still win} 31. Qxb5 Rf8 32. Ra6 Qg7 33. Rd6{Anand uses fantastic technique for the remainder of the game to seal Leko’s fate.} d3 34. Qb6 Qe5 35. Bg6 d2 36. Bxf5 Qxf5 37. Qd4+ Kh7 38. Qxd2
Rf7 39. f3 h5 40. Rd5 Qg6 41. Qa5 Rg7 42. h4 Qb1+ 43. Kh2 Qxb2 44. Rxg5
Rxg5 45. Qxg5 1-0

Team Kramnik

October 15, 2008

For the 2008 World Chess Championship match in Bonn, Germany, Vladimir Kramnik has selected these players as his “Seconds.” I hope my readers will visit again tomorrow to view my coverage for game 1 of the 2008 World Chess Championship Match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik.

 
Name: Peter Leko
Date of birth: 09-08-1979
Country: Hungary
Current Rating: 2763
Description: Leko became the youngest grandmaster in the history of chess in 1994, at 14  years of age. Peter went on to win the Dortmund Super Tournament in both 1999 and  2002 defeating very strong opponents in both events. In 2004d Leko came extremely  close to becoming Hungary’s first World Champion. Leko lead Kramnik by one point  going into the final game of heir match. Kramnik won this game and retianed his   title by having a split score with Leko.
Notable Game:

[Event “Classical World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Brissago SUI”]
[Date “2004.01.09”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “8”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Peter Leko”]
[ECO “C89”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “64”]

1. e4 {Notes by Raymond Keene.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4
Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 {The dangerous
Marshall Gambit, which Kramnik had avoided in earlier games.}
9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4
14. g3 Qh3 15. Re4 g5 {This was first played in the game
Petrosian-Averbakh, Moscow 1947. That game saw 16 Nd2 Bf5 17
Qe2 Nf6 18 Re5 Bxe5 19 dxe5 Ng4 and Black went on to win. The
point of 15 … g5 is to prevent Rh4, while 16 Bxg5 fails to
16 … Qf5.} 16. Qf1 Qh5 17. Nd2 Bf5 18. f3 Nf6 19. Re1 Rae8
20. Rxe8 Rxe8 21. a4 Qg6 22. axb5 {Starting on the road to
perdition. White must play 22 Ne4 Nxe4 23 fxe4 when 23
… Bxe4 24 axb5 axb5 (24 … Bd3 fails to 25 Bxf7+) 25 Bxg5
is in White’s favour. In this line Black must play 22 Ne4 Bxe4
23 fxe4 Nxe4 with approximate equality.} Bd3 23. Qf2 Re2
24. Qxe2 {This was played quickly in the evident belief that
White was winning. In fact White must now turn his thoughts to
survival by 24 bxa6 Rxf2 25 Kxf2 Qh5 26 Ke3 Bxa6 27 Rxa6 Qxh2
when there is still some fight left in the game. In this line
26 Kg1 loses to 26 … Qh3 27 a7 Bxg3 28 a8=Q+ Kg7 29 hxg3
Qxg3+ 30 Kh1 g4 31 Qxc6 Qh3+ 32 Kg1 g3} Bxe2 25. bxa6 Qd3 {The
key move which Kramnik and his team had underestimated before
the game. If now 26 a7 Qe3+ 27 Kg2 Bxf3+ 28 Nxf3 Qe2+ 29 Kg1
Ng4 30 a8=Q+ Kg7 31 Qxc6 Qf2+ 32 Kh1 Qf1+ 33 Ng1 Nf2
mate. Alternatively 30 Be3 Nxe3 31 a8=Q+ Kg7 32 Nh4 gxh4 33
Qxc6 hxg3 34 hxg3 Bxg3 and mate follows. White can also play
26 Bc4 which is refuted by 26 … Qe3+ 27 Kg2 g4 28 f4 Ne4 29
a7 Qf2+ 30 Kh1 Nxd2 31 a8=Q+ Kg7 and White is defenceless.}
26. Kf2 Bxf3 27. Nxf3 Ne4+ 28. Ke1 Nxc3 {Much stronger than 28
… Qxf3. This final sacrifice lays White’s position to
waste.} 29. bxc3 Qxc3+ 30. Kf2 Qxa1 31. a7 h6 32. h4 g4 {At
the end of the game Kramnik said, sportingly: “a beautiful
game that will be remembered in the history of chess.”} 0-1

 

Name: Sergey Rublevsky
Date of birth: 10-15-1974
Country: Russia
Current Rating: 2702
Description: Rublevsky won the 2004 Aeroflot Open, the 2005 Russian Championship and  Aerosvit Foros 2006. In addition, he has represented Russia in five Olympiads and  two World Team Championships. During his successful career, Sergey defeated both  Anatoli Karpov and Garry Kasparov in tournament games.
Notable Game:

[Event “20th European Club Clup”]

[Site “Izmir TUR”]

[Date “2004.10.04”]

[EventDate “2004.10.03”]

[Round “2”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Sergei Rublevsky”]

[Black “Garry Kasparov”]

[ECO “B30”]

[WhiteElo “2649”]

[BlackElo “2813”]

[PlyCount “113”]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. O-O Nge7 5. c3 a6 6. Ba4 c4
7. Qe2 b5 8. Bc2 Ng6 9. b3 Qc7 10. bxc4 Nf4 11. Qe3 bxc4
12. Ba3 Be7 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Na3 O-O 15. Rab1 f5 16. Qb6 Qxb6
17. Rxb6 fxe4 18. Bxe4 d5 19. Bc2 Neg6 20. Bxg6 Nxg6 21. Nc2
e5 22. Ne3 Bf5 23. Nxf5 Rxf5 24. Rfb1 Raf8 25. Rxa6 e4 26. Nd4
Rxf2 27. Ne6 R2f6 28. Nxf8 Rxa6 29. Nxg6 hxg6 30. Kf2 Rxa2
31. Ke3 Kf7 32. Rb7+ Kf6 33. Rb6+ Kf7 34. Rd6 Ra5 35. h4 g5
36. hxg5 Ke7 37. Rc6 Ra1 38. Kd4 Rd1 39. Kxd5 e3 40. Re6+ Kd7
41. Rxe3 Rxd2+ 42. Kxc4 Rxg2 43. Re5 Kd6 44. Ra5 Rg4+ 45. Kb3
Rg1 46. Kb4 Rb1+ 47. Kc4 Ke6 48. Ra6+ Kf5 49. g6 Rg1 50. Kb5
Ke5 51. c4 Rb1+ 52. Kc6 Rg1 53. Kd7 Rd1+ 54. Ke7 Rb1 55. Ra5+
Kd4 56. Kf8 Rb7 57. Rf5 1-0

 

Name: Laurent Fressinet
Date of Birth: 11-01-1981
Country: France
Current Rating: 2673
Description: Fressinet has a very impressive overall record of +161 -82 =243. However, he  still lacks the major tournament victories to make him a household name in the chess  world.
Notable Game:

[Event “Victor Ciocaltea Mem”]

[Site “Bucharest ROM”]

[Date “2001.03.13”]

[EventDate “2001.03.04”]

[Round “10”]
[Result “1-0”]

[White “Laurent Fressinet”]

[Black “Constantin Ionescu”]

[ECO “C65”]
[WhiteElo “2581”]

[BlackElo “2504”]

[PlyCount “51”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Bc5 5. Nxe5 Nxe5 6. d4
a6 7. Be2 Be7 8. dxe5 Nxe4 9. c4 O-O 10. Qc2 Nc5 11. Be3 c6
12. Nc3 Qc7 13. f4 a5 14. Rae1 f6 15. Kh1 fxe5 16. Bxc5 Bxc5
17. Bd3 exf4 18. Bxh7+ Kh8 19. Bg6 Qd8 20. Re5 d6 21. Qd1 f3
22. Rxf3 Bg4 23. Rh5+ Kg8 24. Bh7+ Kh8 25. Rxf8+ Qxf8 26. Bf5+
1-0

My Friends are Better Than Yours… Anand and Kramnik Get Seconds

October 13, 2008
In under 2 days Anand will play Kramnik!

In under 2 days Anand will play Kramnik!

   The upcoming 12 game World Championship match between Anand and Kramnik is creating internet rumors faster than Alexandra Kosteniuk makes blitz moves in China. Most of these rumors seem to be speculation on opening choices and who is going to be the “Second” for Anand and Kramnik. A “Second” refers to a chess players choice of another strong chess player to help him/her prepare for a particular opponent. Generally this early preparation focuses on finding new ideas and weaknesses in an opponent’s opening repertoire. The role of the Second was arguably much more important in the time before large chess databases and strong computer engines. With the onset of the computer dominated age of chess, we are also seeing match play that has a much shorter structure and therefor less games to try prepared innovations. The upcoming match between Anand and Kramnik is only scheduled for 12 rounds. I am confident that both Anand and Kramnik are capable of coming up with six very good ideas as to what to try with each color. For the upcoming Anand vs. Kramnik match, a Second’s primary role will likely be acting as the flashy Rybka yielding intimidator in a world champion contender’s entourage. Basically a “my friend is stronger than your friend” ornament meant to impress upon the chess world that the player that attracts friends/disciples with higher ratings must be the next chess messiah.
   So who have Anand and Kramnik chosen for this critical role? Viswanathan Anand’s Second is very likely to be the 2786 rated Grand Master from Norway, Magnus Carlsen. Born in 1990 in Tønsberg, Magnus played his first tournament at the age of eight and was coached at the Norwegian High School for Top Athletes by the country’s top player, Grandmaster (GM) Simen Agdestein. On 26 April 2004 Carlsen became a Grandmaster at the age of 13 years, 4 months, and 27 days, the third youngest Grandmaster age in history. Carlsen and Anand are reported to get along very well and have been seen dining together as well as reinacting scenes from Monty Python’s Flying Circus. If for no other reason, Magnus is a good choice because he will likely be able to keep Viswanathan Anand more relaxed than any other top ten rated player. Even still, it seems odd to have Anand’s Second be higher rated than Anand.
   Vladimir Kramnik’s Second is confirmed to be the 2747 former World Championship Match participant from Hungary, Peter Leko. Leko was born on September 8, 1979 in Subotica, Yugoslavia. He became a grandmaster in 1994 at the age of 14 years and in doing so became the youngest grandmaster ever. This choice makes sense for Kramnik as Leko’s style is very similar to Kramnik’s solid play. The choice seems a little odd in that from September 25-October 18, 2004 Leko was attempting to take the World Chess Champion title from Kramnik in a match of their own. Leko led by a point with just one game left to play. Kramnik managed to win the last game, tying the match 7-7 (+2 -2 =10), which entitled him to remain the reigning “classical” world champion.

1 day and 21 hours left until the World Chess Championship 2008 begins!


%d bloggers like this: