Posts Tagged ‘Vassily Ivanchuk’

World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 2 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

November 1, 2013

In our first preview game to the 2013 World Chess Championship, we studied a game where a young Magnus Carlsen demolishes his opponent. In preview two to the World Chess Championship Match between Anand and Carlsen, we will examine a game where our current World Chess Champion destroys Vassily Ivanchuk with style.

What is the best way for white to stop Anand's attack?

What is the best way for white to stop Anand’s attack?

 

[Event “It”]

[Site “Reggio Emilia (Italy)”]

[Date “1989”]

[Round “35”]

[White “Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR)”]

[Black “Anand, Viswanathan (IND)”]

[Result “0-1”]

[Eco “C42”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nf6 {This is called Petroff’s Defence or, simply, The Russian Game.}

3.Nxe5 d6 ( 3…Nxe4 4.Qe2 Nf6 5.Nc6+ {Is a famous Queen winning trap every chess player should know.}

)

4.Nf3 Nxe4

5.d4 {This is the classical Petroff Defence.}

( 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Be7 {Is another fun line which gives white easy development and a strong attack.}

) ( 5.Qe2 Qe7 6.d3 Nf6 7.Nc3 Qxe2+ 8.Bxe2 Be7 9.Nd4 O-O 10.Bf4

c6 11.O-O d5 12.Rfe1 Na6 13.Bf3 Bd8 14.a3 Bb6 15.Nb3 Re8 16.Na4

Bc7 17.Bg5 Bf5 18.Bxf6 gxf6 19.g3 Bd6 20.Na5 Rxe1+ 21.Rxe1 Rb8

22.Nc3 Bd7 23.Nb3 Nc5 24.Nxc5 Bxc5 {…1/2-1/2, Ivanchuk Vassily (UKR) 2775  – Wang Yue (CHN) 2697 , Beijing 12/16/2011 It “Sportaccord WMG” (blindfold)}

)

d5

6.Bd3 Be7 ( 6…Bd6 7.O-O O-O 8.c4 c6 9.Nc3 Nxc3 10.bxc3

dxc4 {Black can keep the symetry a little longer with this old line. The modern preference is as played by Anand.}

)

7.O-O Nc6

8.Re1 Bg4

9.c3 f5

10.Qb3 {This is a nice way to get rid of the pin.}

Qd6 {Viswanathan Anand plays a rare move which I have also employed with success.}

( 10…O-O 11.Nbd2 Na5 12.Qc2 Bd6 13.Ne5 Bh5 14.b4 Nc6 15.Ndf3

Re8 16.Bb2 Qf6 17.Qb3 Kh8 18.Be2 Rxe5 19.dxe5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 Bxe5

21.Bxh5 Bxh2+ 22.Kxh2 Qh4+ 23.Kg1 Qxf2+ 24.Kh2 {1/2-1/2, Leko Peter (HUN) 2751  – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2788 , Linares  2/25/2005 It (cat.20)}

)

11.Nfd2 O-O-O

12.f3 Bh4 {I like this move but Ne5 is also interesting.}

( 12…Ne5 13.Bxe4 dxe4 14.fxg4 Bh4 15.Re2 Qa6 16.Qd1 Nxg4 17.h3

Qd3 18.hxg4 e3 19.Na3 Rde8 20.Nc2 Bf2+ 21.Rxf2 exf2+ 22.Kxf2

fxg4 23.Qxg4+ Kb8 24.Nf3 Qxc2+ 25.Kg1 {+0.04 CAP} )

13.Rf1

( 13.Re2 Bh5 14.Nf1 Rhf8 15.Qc2 Kb8 16.Na3 f4 17.fxe4 f3 18.gxf3

Rxf3 19.e5 Rxf1+ 20.Kxf1 Qe6 21.Kg1 Rf8 22.Be3 Qh3 23.Qd2 Bf3

24.Nc2 g5 25.Rg2 g4 26.Bf1 g3 27.Rxg3 Qf5 28.Rxf3 Qxf3 29.Bg2

Rg8 30.Kh1 Qh5 31.Bxd5 Rd8 32.Bxc6 {1-0, Anka Emil (HUN) 2400  – Mosna Stefano (ITA) 2149 , Budapest 1996 It (cat.2)}

)

Bh3 {Viswanathan Anand is not known for this kind of aggression but is certainly capable of it.}

( 13…Bf2+ 14.Rxf2 Nxf2 15.Kxf2 Qxh2 16.Nf1 Qh4+ 17.Kg1 Bh5

18.Bxf5+ Kb8 19.Be3 Rdf8 20.Bd7 Rxf3 21.Nbd2 Rf6 22.Qxd5 Rd8

23.g3 Rg6 24.Qg2 Qe7 25.Bf5 Rgd6 26.Nc4 Rd5 27.Be4 Bf7 28.Bf4

Rh5 29.Bxc6 Bxc4 30.Bxb7 Rb5 31.Bc6 Ra5 32.Ne3 Bxa2 33.Nc4 {…1-0, Kovacevic Aleksandar (SRB) 2541  – Saric Ante (CRO) 2489 , Zadar 12/13/2006 It (open)}

) ( 13…Rhf8 14.Qc2 h5 15.Nb3 Rde8 16.Na3 f4 17.fxg4 hxg4 18.Bxe4

dxe4 19.Nb5 Qh6 20.Bxf4 Rxf4 21.Rxf4 Qxf4 22.g3 Bxg3 23.hxg3

Qxg3+ 24.Qg2 Qe3+ 25.Qf2 Qd3 26.Nc5 Qxb5 27.Qf4 {1-0, Bruzon Lazaro (CUB) 2534  – Andres Gonzalez Alberto (ESP) 2362 , Oviedo 2000 Tournament (team)}

) ( 13…Nxd2 14.Nxd2 Bh5 15.Bxf5+ Kb8 16.Qc2 Ne7 {+0.56 CAP} )

 

14.Qc2 ( 14.Nxe4 fxe4 15.fxe4 dxe4 16.Bxe4 Rhf8 17.Nd2 Rde8 18.Qb5

Rxf1+ 19.Qxf1 Bd7 20.Nc4 Qf6 21.Qxf6 gxf6 22.g3 Rxe4 23.gxh4

Ne7 24.Bd2 Nf5 25.Be1 Rg4+ 26.Bg3 Be6 27.Nd2 Nxg3 28.hxg3 Rxg3+

29.Kf2 Rh3 30.Ne4 Bd5 31.Nc5 b6 32.Na6 Rxh4 33.b3 Rh3 {…1/2-1/2, Woda Jacek (POL) 2383  – Ostrowski Leszek (POL) 2340 , Poznan 1987 It}

)

Qg6

15.Nb3 Rhf8

16.Na3 ( 16.Kh1 {+1.38 CAP} )

Rde8 {Ivanchuk must play Bf4 followed by Kh1 to survive Anand’s attack.}

17.Kh1 {??} ( 17.Bf4 {!} Nd8

( 17…Bg5 {+1.46 CAP} ) 18.Kh1 Ne6 19.Be5 $18 {Borriss – Camejo, Chile 1990}

Bf6 20.gxh3 Bxe5 21.dxe5 Nf4 22.fxe4 fxe4 23.Bb5 Rxe5 24.Nd4

c6 25.Rg1 Qh6 26.Be2 Nxh3 27.Bg4+ Kb8 28.Bxh3 Qxh3 29.Qg2 Qh5

30.Raf1 Rxf1 31.Rxf1 g6 32.Qg3 a6 33.Nf5 {1-0, Borriss Martin (GER) 2427  – Camejo Rui (POR) 2296 , Santiago 1990 Ch World (juniors) (under 20)}

)

Nf2+ {!} {Anand punishes Ivanchuk’s careless play.}

18.Rxf2 Bxg2+ {!} {There is nothing for Ivanchuk to do except resign.} 0-1

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Tal Memorial 2009: Round 7

November 13, 2009

In round 7 Vassily Ivanchuk punishes Boris Gelfand’s small inaccuracies with authority. Now Ivanchuk and Anand are just a half game behind Kramnik.  Below is Ivanchuk’s win followed by a game where the opening line was first played.

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “1:06:33-0:46:33”]
[Date “2009.11.12”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “7”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Ivanchuk”]
[Black “Gelfand”]
[ECO “A06”]

1.d4 d5{notes by Chris Torres} 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bg4 5.h3 Bxf3 6.Qxf3 e6 7.Nc3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Bd6 10.O-O O-O 11.e4 e5 12.d5 Nb6 13.Bd3 cxd5 14.exd5 h6 15.Be3 Rc8 16.Rac1 Nc4{This mistake will cost Gelfland the pawn on a7. Gelfland should have played 16…Bc5} 17.Bxc4 Rxc4 18.Qe2 Rc8 19.Bxa7 b6{Another error. Gelfland should have played 19…Qa5.} 20.Nb5 Rc5 21.Rfd1 Qd7 22.Nxd6{Ivanchuk should have continued with 22.Rxc5 Bxc5 23.a4 Qb7. 24.a5 with a powerful advantage. His slight error allows Gelfland more drawing chances.} Qxd6{Gelfland failed to find the best variation. 22…Rxc1 23.Rxc1 Qxd6 24.a4 Nxd5 25.Rd1 Qc6 26.Qb5 Qxb5 27.axb5 Ra8 seems to aim toward a draw.} 23.Rxc5 Qxc5 24.Qe3 Qc2 25.Qb3 Qxb3 26.axb3 Rd8 27.d6 b5 28.f3 Ra8 29.Be3 Nd7 30.Rd5 Rb8 31.f4 exf4 32.Bxf4 f6 33.Rd2 Kf7 34.Kf2 Ke6 35.Ke3 Rc8 36.Kd4 g5{36…b4 seems stronger. Play could continue 37.g4 Rc6 38.Re2 Ne5 39.Bxe5 fxe5 40.Rxe5 Kxd6. Ivanchuk punishes Gelfland’s small inaccuracies with authority.} 37.Re2+ Ne5 38.Bxe5 fxe5+ 39.Rxe5+ Kxd6 40.Rxb5 Rc2 41.g4 Rxb2 42.Rb6+ Kc7 43.Kc3  1-0

[Event “?”]
[Site “Pardubice”]
[Date “1994.??.??”]
[White “Murdzia,Piotr”]
[Black “Krasenkov,Mikhail”]
[Round “?”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “A06”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 c6 3. e3 Nf6 4. c4 Bg4 5. Nc3
e6 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 Nbd7 8. Bd3 Bd6 9. O-O
O-O 10. e4 dxc4 11. Bxc4 e5 12. d5 Nb6 13. Bb3
Nfd7 14. a3 c5 15. Qg4 Kh8 16. Bg5 f6 17. Bd2
c4 18. Bc2 Bc5 19. h4 Bd4 20. h5 Nc8 21. g3
Nd6 22. Rab1 b5 23. Ne2 a5 24. Kg2 Bc5 25. f4
f5 26. exf5 Nf6 27. Qg5 Nf7  0-1


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