Posts Tagged ‘Chris Torres’

My Favorite #Chess Games: The Evergreen Game

June 22, 2018
anderssen

Karl Ernst Adolf Anderssen (July 6, 1818 – March 13, 1879)

I keep returning to the combination of artistry, complexity and romanticism that is the Evergreen Game. The freshness of ideas that occur with close analysis continues to intrigue and inspire each new generation of chess players who choose to explore this breathtaking game. In fact, the actual moves of Adolf Anderssen and Jean Dufresne are just the beginning, the true beauty of The Evergreen Game lies in the endless possibilities surrounding blacks infamous 19th move. Had Jean Dufresne chosen better there, I remain confident that the game would still be evergreen. In my notes below I include all of my discoveries from two decades of teaching the game. For ease of study, I recommend copying the text and pasting it into your favorite chess program. Enjoy!

 

imb_nvxeo7

 

[Event “The Evergreen Game”]
[Site “Berlin (Germany)”]
[Date “1852”]
[Round “”]
[White “Anderssen Adolf (GER)”]
[Black “Dufresne Jean (GER)”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C52”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ EVANS gam.,C52] Anderssen Adolf (GER) +20 =0 -7 Dufresne Jean (GER) +1 =0 -7
Anderssen Adolf (GER)-Dufresne Jean (GER) +6 =0 -1} 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3
Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 {
The Evans Gambit is an aggressive choice named after the Welsh sea Captain
William Davies Evans. Here white gladly offers a pawn so he/she can open the
center and develop faster than in the Giuoco Piano(1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5
4.c3 Nf6 5.d4) by not having to spend a tempo on playing pawn to c3.}
Bxb4 {Although I recommend accepting the gambit, Black can also chose to decline it as seen below.}
( 4…Bb6 5.a4 a6 6.Bb2 d6 7.b5 axb5 8.axb5 Rxa1 9.Bxa1 Na5 10.Be2
Nf6 11.Nc3 O-O 12.O-O c6 13.d4 Qe7 14.dxe5 dxe5 15.Na4 Bd8
( 15…Bc7 {?} 16.b6 Bb8 17.Qd2 $18 ) 16.Bxe5 Nxe4 17.Bd3 Ng5
( 17…Nf6 18.Bd6 {!} ) 18.Bd4 Ne6 19.Be5 Bc7 20.Qe1 cxb5 21.Bxb5
Nc6 22.Bxc6 bxc6 23.Qc3 Bb7 24.Bxc7 Qxc7 25.Nc5 Bc8 26.Ne5 Re8
27.Ned3 Nf4 28.Nxf4 Qxf4 29.Re1 Rxe1+ 30.Qxe1 Kf8 31.Nd3 Qd6
32.Qe4 h6 33.h3 Be6 34.Ne5 Qd5 35.f3 Qxe4 36.fxe4 Ke7 {?}
( 36…c5 37.Nd3 c4 38.Nc5 Ke7 39.e5 f6 40.exf6+ Kxf6 41.Kf2
Bd5 42.g3 Ke5 {=} ) 37.Nxc6+ Kd6 38.Nd4 Ke5 39.Nxe6 fxe6 40.Kf2
Kxe4 41.Ke2 Kd4 42.Kd2 g5 ( 42…h5 43.c3+ Ke4 44.h4 e5 45.Ke2
Kf4 46.Kd3 g5 47.hxg5 Kxg5 48.Ke4 Kf6 49.Kd5 {!} $18 ) 43.c3+
Kc4 44.g4 Kd5 45.Kd3 Kc5 46.Ke4 {1-0, Breyer Gyula (HUN) – Nyholm Gustaf (SWE), Baden-Baden 1914 It}
) 5.c3 {Attacking Black’s bishop again while preparing to play d4.}
Ba5 {White must also be prepared for 5… Bc5 and 5… Be7. See below.}
( 5…Bc5 6.d4 exd4 7.O-O d6 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Nc3 Na5 10.Bg5 f6 11.Bh4
Nxc4 12.Qa4+ Qd7 13.Qxc4 Qf7 14.Nd5 Nh6 ( 14…Be6 15.Qa4+ Bd7
16.Qa3 {!} ) 15.Rad1 Bg4 16.Qc1 {!} Bxf3 17.gxf3 O-O 18.Kh1 Qh5
19.Qf4 Kh8 ( 19…g5 {?} 20.Nxf6+ Rxf6 21.Qxf6 Qxh4 22.Rg1 Nf7
23.Rg4 Qh6 24.Rxg5+ Qxg5 25.Rg1 $18 ) ( 19…c6 {!} 20.Nxf6+
Rxf6 {!} 21.Bxf6 gxf6 22.Qxf6 Nf7 $13) 20.Nxf6 {!} $16Qf7 21.e5
dxe5 22.dxe5 Ng8 ( 22…Rad8 23.Qe4 ) 23.Rg1 {!} gxf6
( 23…Nxf6 24.exf6 gxf6 25.Rd7 {!} Qe6 26.Qh6 $18 ) 24.Rxg8+
{!} Rxg8 ( 24…Qxg8 25.Rg1 Qe6 26.Qh6 $18 ) 25.Bxf6+ Rg7 26.Rg1
Rag8 27.Qh6 {!} $18 Bc5 ( 27…Bxf2 28.Rg4 {! ‘with the idea’ e6,e7} $18 {}
) 28.e6 Qf8 29.f4 Be7 30.Ba1 b5 31.f3 c5 32.f5 b4 33.Rg3 c4 34.Qxh7+
{1-0, Chigorin Mikhail I (RUS) – Yakubovich N (RUS), Russia 1879 corr.}
) ( 5…Be7 6.d4 Na5 7.Be2 {!} {
7. Ne5 – Kasparov – Short, London (active) 1993 7. Bf7 – Losev – Baikov,
Moscow 1989 7. Bd3 – Losev – A.Alekhin, Leningrad 1987}
( 7.Nxe5 Nxc4 8.Nxc4 d5 9.exd5 Qxd5 10.Ne3 Qd8 11.O-O Nf6 12.c4
O-O 13.Nc3 c6 14.Rb1 Re8 15.Bb2 Qc7 16.Qf3 Bd7 $13 )
( 7.Bxf7+ Kxf7 8.Nxe5+ Kf8 ( 8…Ke8 9.Qh5+ g6 10.Nxg6 Nf6 11.Qh4
$40 ) 9.Qf3+ Nf6 10.g4 d6 11.g5 dxe5 12.gxf6 Bxf6 13.dxe5 Nc4
14.exf6 Qxf6 15.Qxf6+ gxf6 16.Bh6+ Kf7 17.Rg1 Rg8 {=} )
( 7.Bd3 d6 8.dxe5 dxe5 9.Nxe5 Nf6 10.O-O O-O 11.Qc2 c5 12.f4
c4 {!} 13.Nxc4 Nxc4 14.Bxc4 Bc5+ 15.Kh1 Ng4 16.g3 Qb6 17.Na3
Re8 $45 ) exd4 {?} { 7… d6! – Melts – Finocchiaro, corr. 1991}
( 7…d6 {!} 8.Qa4+ c6 9.dxe5 dxe5 10.Nxe5 Nf6 11.O-O b5 {!}
( 11…O-O 12.Rd1 Qc7 13.Bf4 Bd6 14.Rxd6 Qxd6 15.Ng6 $16 )
( 11…Qc7 12.Nf3 O-O 13.e5 $14 ) 12.Qc2 O-O ( 12…Qc7 13.Nf3
Bg4 14.Nbd2 Rd8 15.a4 a6 16.axb5 axb5 17.Ba3 $14 ) 13.a4 Qc7
( 13…b4 14.cxb4 Bxb4 {=} ) 14.Nf3 a6 {=} {(B) Belloskus – Melts, corr. 1983 (C) Melts – Jankind, corr. 1991}
) 8.Qxd4 {!} {8. cd – Melts – Usatchy, corr. 1989-91}
( 8.cxd4 Nf6 9.Qa4 b6 10.Nc3 Bb7 11.d5 O-O 12.O-O Re8 13.Bb2
c6 14.Rad1 d6 $13 ) Nf6 ( 8…d6 9.Qxg7 Bf6 10.Qg3 Ne7 11.Bg5
$16 ) 9.e5 Nc6 10.Qh4 { 10. Qf4 – Melts – Gajewski, URS 1981}
( 10.Qf4 Nh5 11.Qa4 g6 12.Bh6 $16 ) Nd5 11.Qg3 {!} g6 12.O-O
Nb6 13.c4 d6 14.Rd1 {} $16 {} Nd7 15.Bh6 Ncxe5 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Nc3
f6 18.c5 {!} Nf7 19.cxd6 cxd6 20.Qe3 Nxh6 21.Qxh6 Bf8 22.Qe3+
Kf7 23.Nd5 Be6 24.Nf4 Qe7 25.Re1 {[ S. ABRAMOV ]} {1-0, Kasparov Garry (RUS) 2795 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2725 , Riga 1995 Memorial M.Tal (cat.17)}
) 6.d4 {A wise old man once said of the opening, “Always play to gain control of the center.”}
exd4 {Cracking the center open may be playing into white’s plans but the alternatives are even more difficult for black.}
( 6…d6 7.Qb3 Qd7 8.dxe5 Bb6 9.Nbd2 Na5 ( 9…dxe5 10.Ba3 Na5
11.Qb4 c5 12.Qb2 Nxc4 13.Nxc4 f6 14.Rd1 Qe6 15.Nd6+ Ke7 16.O-O
Nh6 17.c4 Nf7 18.Nxc8+ Raxc8 19.Rd5 $44 {Christiansen – Gretarsson, Yerevan (ol) 1996}
) 10.Qb4 Nxc4 ( 10…Ne7 {!?} 11.exd6 Nec6 $13 {Maeder – Heinz, Amsterdam 1969}
) 11.Nxc4 Bc5 12.Qb3 Ne7 13.O-O O-O 14.exd6 cxd6 15.Ba3 {!} {x d6}
Qc7 16.Nd4 Bxa3 17.Nxa3 Nc6 18.Rfe1 Qe7 19.Rab1 Ne5 20.c4 a6
21.Nac2 Be6 22.Ne3 b5 {%09} 23.Nd5 {!} {%09} Bxd5 24.cxd5 {} $16 { x c6}
Qf6 25.Nc6 Rfe8 26.Rbc1 g6 27.h3 h5 28.Nxe5 Rxe5 29.Rc6 Qe7 30.f3
g5 31.Qb4 Rd8 32.Rxa6 f5 33.Qa5 fxe4 34.Ra7 Rd7 35.Rxd7 Qxd7
36.fxe4 g4 37.hxg4 hxg4 38.Qc3 Qa7+ 39.Qe3 Qxe3+ ( 39…Qxa2
{!?} {} ) 40.Rxe3 Kf7 41.Kf2 Kf6 42.Re2 Re8 43.Ke3 g3 44.Kf4
Ra8 45.Rb2 Ra5 46.a3 Rxa3 47.Rxb5 Ra2 48.Rb6 Rxg2 49.Rxd6+ Kf7
50.Kf3 Rg1 51.Re6 {[ A. MITENKOV ]} {1-0, Short Nigel D (ENG) 2660 – Huebner Robert Dr (GER) 2580 , Dortmund 1997 It (cat.18)}
) 7.O-O {Castling out of the pin is the obvious plan for white.}
d3 {A clever push that has the intended consequence of leaving the c3 square
unavailable for white’s knight while trying to slow down white’s development. 7… Nge7 should also be strongly considered.}
( 7…dxc3 8.Qb3 Qf6 9.e5 Qg6 10.Nxc3 Nge7 11.Ne2 Bb6 12.Ba3
O-O 13.Rad1 Re8 14.Nh4 Qh5 15.Ng3 Qxh4 16.Bxf7+ Kf8 17.Bxe8 Kxe8
18.Rfe1 Qf4 19.Re4 Qf7 20.Qc2 Nd8 21.Rd3 Ne6 22.Rf3 Qg6 23.Qb3
c5 24.h4 h5 25.Kh2 Bc7 26.Rd3 b6 27.Bc1 {…0-1, Anderssen Adolf (GER) – Dufresne Jean (GER), Berlin 1851}
) ( 7…d6 8.Qb3 Qf6 9.cxd4 Bb6 10.Bb5 Kf8 11.e5 dxe5 12.Ba3+
Nge7 13.Nc3 Kg8 14.Ne4 Qf4 15.d5 Qxe4 16.dxc6 Be6 17.Qb2 Nxc6
18.Rfe1 Qd5 19.Bxc6 Qxc6 20.Nxe5 Qa4 21.Bb4 Rd8 22.Bc3 f6 23.Nf3
Kf7 24.Rac1 Qxa2 {0-1, Mieles Palau Daniel (ECU) 2486 – Granda Zuniga Julio E (PER) 2637 , Salinas 2/23/2005 It (cat.8)}
) ( 7…Nge7 8.Ng5 d5 9.exd5 Ne5 10.Bb3 O-O 11.Nxh7 Kxh7 12.Qh5+
Kg8 13.Qxe5 Nf5 14.Bd2 c5 15.dxc6 bxc6 16.Re1 Bc7 17.Qe4 Qf6
18.Bf4 {1/2-1/2, Short Nigel D (ENG) 2677 – Adams Michael (ENG) 2755 , Sarajevo 2000 It (cat.19)}
) 8.Qb3 {Developing the queen with a major threat to the belly button.}
Qf6 {Developing the queen onto a dangerous diagonal while providing a much needed defender to f7.}
9.e5 {Threatening the guard. Black can not capture the pawn because his uncastled
king would allow white to pin and win the knight with Re1.}
( 9.Re1 Nge7 ( 9…Bb6 10.e5 Qg6 11.Qd1 Nh6 12.Bxd3 Qh5 13.h3
Ne7 14.Nbd2 d5 15.exd6 cxd6 16.Nc4 Bc5 17.Bg5 f6 18.Nxd6+ Bxd6
19.Bb5+ Kf8 20.Qxd6 Nhf5 21.Qd8+ Kf7 22.Rxe7+ Nxe7 23.Ne5+ {1-0, Anderssen Adolf (GER) – Dufresne Jean (GER), Berlin 1855}
) 10.Bg5 Qg6 11.Bxe7 Kxe7 12.e5 Kf8 13.Nbd2 Bb6 14.Ne4 Nd8 15.Qa3+
Ke8 16.Nf6+ {1-0, Anderssen Adolf (GER) – Rosenthal Samuel (POL), Vienna 1873 It (matches)}
) Qg6 {Qf5 was also a possibilty.} ( 9…Qf5 10.Ba3
( 10.Rd1 Nge7 11.Bxd3 Qh5 12.Nbd2 {is also possible.} ) Nge7
11.Nd4 Qh5 12.Nxc6 Nxc6 13.Nd2 Bb6 14.Rae1 a5 15.Ne4 Nxe5 {?}
16.Nd6+ {!} cxd6 17.Qxb6 O-O 18.Qxd6 Ng6 19.Bxd3 Rd8 20.Bxg6
Qg5 21.Qc7 hxg6 22.Be7 {1-0, Eskelinen Aarno (FIN) 2191 – Tapaninen Jukka, Finland 1989}
) 10.Re1 {White’s attack is so powerful he has three strong choices.}
( 10.Ba3 Nge7 11.Nd4 Bb6 12.Nd2 Bxd4 13.Bxe7 Bxc3 14.Qxc3 Nxe7
15.Bxd3 Qc6 16.Qa3 Qe6 17.Bc4 d5 18.exd6 Qxd6 19.Qf3 O-O 20.Ne4
Qg6 21.Rfe1 Bg4 22.Qf4 Nc6 23.Qxc7 Rac8 24.Qd6 Bf5 25.Qf4 Nb4
26.Nd6 Bh3 27.g3 Nc2 28.Nxc8 Bxc8 29.Re7 Be6 {…1-0, Kuijpers Frans A (NED) 2375 – Von Saldern Ruediger (GER) 2143 , Les Dicqs 2002 It (open)}
) ( 10.Rd1 Nge7 11.Bxd3 Qh5 12.Nbd2 O-O 13.Ba3 d6 14.exd6 cxd6
15.Bxd6 Rd8 16.Nc4 Be6 17.Qa3 Bxc4 18.Bxc4 Nf5 19.Bf4 Qg4 20.Bxf7+
Kxf7 21.Qb3+ Kf8 22.Ng5 Nh6 23.Nxh7+ Ke8 24.Re1+ Ne7 25.Rxe7+
Kxe7 26.Re1+ {1-0, Wan Yunguo (CHN) 2487 – Zeng Chongsheng (CHN) 2456 , Beijing 9/18/2012 Zt}
) Nge7 {Black would obviously like to get castled.} 11.Ba3
( 11.Nbd2 O-O 12.Ne4 d5 13.exd6 cxd6 14.Bxd3 d5 15.Nc5 Qh5 16.Bg5
Ng6 17.Bd2 Bb6 18.Qb5 Bg4 19.Ng5 h6 20.h3 hxg5 21.hxg4 Qxg4 22.Be2
Qf5 23.Bd3 Qf6 24.Be3 Nge5 25.Be2 Rfe8 26.Rad1 Rad8 27.Qb3 Na5
28.Qb5 Qc6 29.Bd4 Nec4 30.Qb4 Nd6 {…1-0, Conquest Stuart (ENG) 2539 – Narciso Dublan Marc (ESP) 2476 , Pamplona 2002 It (cat.14)}
) ( 11.Qd1 d5 12.exd6 cxd6 13.Bxd3 Qh5 14.Bg5 Bd8 {-0.04 CAP} )
b5 {?} {Insatead of castling, Black decides to sacrifice a pawn to allow his rook and
bishop to enter into the battle quickly. This plan ends up being overly aggressive. Better was:}
( 11…d5 12.exd6 cxd6 13.Nbd2 O-O ) ( 11…O-O 12.Rd1 d2 13.Nbxd2
d6 14.exd6 cxd6 15.Be2 Be6 ) 12.Qxb5 {!} Rb8 13.Qa4 Bb6
( 13…O-O {?} 14.Bxe7 ) 14.Nbd2 {?} ( 14.Qd1 O-O 15.Bxd3 f5
16.Nbd2 ) Bb7 {?} ( 14…O-O 15.Ne4 d5 16.exd6 cxd6 17.Bxd3 Bg4
18.Nxd6 Qxd3 19.Qxg4 Qxc3 20.Nf5 Nxf5 21.Bxf8 Qb2 22.Kh1 Bxf2
23.Rec1 g6 24.Qe4 Rxf8 25.Qxc6 Bb6 26.Qc3 Qxc3 27.Rxc3 Rd8 )
15.Ne4 {!} Qf5 {?} {Lasker’s suggested improvement is 15… d2.}
( 15…d2 16.Nexd2 O-O ) 16.Bxd3 Qh5 17.Nf6+ gxf6 18.exf6 Rg8
19.Rad1 {!?} {A clever trap but black is not forced to accept it.}
Qxf3 {??} {
The key mistake at the key moment in the game. I could probably write an entire
book on the complexities of the alternatives. Below is some analysis worthy of a chessboard.}
( 19…Bd4 {!} {This move is definately good enough for the draw.} {%08DA}
20.cxd4 ( 20.Nxd4 {%08DA} Rxg2+ 21.Kxg2 Nxd4+ 22.Re4 Bxe4+ 23.Bxe4
Qg4+ 24.Kf1 Qe2+ 25.Kg1 Qxe4 26.Qxd4 Qxd4 27.Rxd4 Ng6 )
( 20.Bf1 {%08DA} Qxf3 21.Rxd4 Ne5 22.Qxd7+ Nxd7 23.Rxe7+ Kd8
24.Rdxd7+ Kc8 25.Rxc7+ Kd8 26.Rcd7+ Kc8 27.Rc7+ Kd8 28.Rcd7+ )
{%09DB} Qxf3 {%09DB} 21.Be4 Rxg2+ 22.Kh1 Rxh2+ 23.Kxh2 Qxf2+
24.Kh1 Qh4+ 25.Kg1 Qg4+ 26.Kh1 Qh3+ 27.Kg1 Qg4+ ) ( 19…Qh3
{!?} {Probably good enough for the draw and has more winning chances for black than 19… Bd4.} {%08DA}
20.Bf1 ( 20.g3 {??} Rxg3+ 21.hxg3 Qxg3+ 22.Kh1 Qxf3+ 23.Kh2 Ne5
24.Qxd7+ Kxd7 25.Be2+ Nd5 26.Bxf3 Nxf3+ 27.Kg3 Nxe1 28.c4 Rg8+
29.Kh4 Bxf2+ 30.Kh5 Rg3 31.Kh6 Rxa3 {and white is crushed.} )
Qf5 21.Kh1 {Eventually leads to a draw but with plenty of opprtunities for each color to play a game losing move.}
( 21.Bxe7 {?} Qxf3 22.Bc5+ Kd8 23.Re7 d6 ( 23…Bc8 {?} 24.Bxb6
Rxb6 ( 24…Qxf6 25.Bxa7 Ra8 26.Re3 Rxa7 27.Qe4 Bb7 28.Rde1 )
25.Rxf7 Qh5 26.Rg7 Rxg7 27.fxg7 Qg6 {and you have to like black’s chances.}
) 24.Bxb6 axb6 25.Rxf7 Qf5 26.Re1 Ne5 27.Rg7 Bd5 28.f4 Rxg7 29.fxg7
b5 30.Qd4 Nc6 31.Qe3 Qf7 32.g3 Ne7 33.Bg2 Bc4 34.Qa7 Rc8 35.Qd4 )
Qxf6 22.Bxe7 Nxe7 23.Rxd7 Kf8 24.Rexe7 Qxf3 25.Rxf7+ Qxf7 26.Rxf7+
Kxf7 27.Qf4+ Ke7 28.Qe5+ Kd8 29.Qf6+ Kd7 30.Qf5+ Kd6 31.Qf4+
Kc6 32.Qf3+ Kd7 33.Qf5+ ) ( 19…Rg4 {?} {A most interesting move that leads to a small advantage for white.} {%08DA}
20.Re4 {!} ( 20.Bc4 {?} {A clear second best to 20. Re4.} Qf5
21.Rxd7 Rxg2+ 22.Kxg2 Qg4+ 23.Kf1 Qh3+ 24.Ke2 Qxd7 25.fxe7 Nd4+
26.Nxd4 Qxa4 27.Bb5+ Qxb5+ 28.Nxb5 Be4 29.c4 Bg6 30.Rd1 c5 31.Rd5
Kxe7 ) Rxe4 21.Qxe4 d6 22.Re1 Qg6 23.Qxc6+ Bxc6 24.Bxg6 hxg6
25.Rxe7+ Kf8 26.Ne5 dxe5 27.Rxc7+ Ke8 28.Rxc6 Bc5 29.Bb4 Bxb4
30.cxb4 Rxb4 31.g3 Ra4 32.Rc7 Rxa2 33.Re7+ Kf8 34.Rxe5 Ra6 35.Re7
Rxf6 36.Rxa7 Kg7 {After all the excitement black is left 1 pawn down in a rook and pawn ending.}
) ( 19…Qg4 {??} {%08DA} 20.Qxg4 Rxg4 21.Bf5 Rf4 22.Bxd7+ Kf8
23.fxe7+ Nxe7 24.Bxe7+ Kg7 25.Nd4 Re4 26.Nf5+ Kg8 27.Bf6 Bc5
28.h3 Bd5 29.Rxe4 Bxe4 30.Nh6+ Kf8 31.Bf5 Bxf5 32.Nxf5 {White would win easily from here.}
) ( 19…Nb4 {??} {Mate in 4.} {%08DA} 20.Qxd7+ Kxd7 21.Bb5+
Kc8 22.Bd7+ Kd8 23.fxe7# ) ( 19…Ne5 {??} {Black gets a lot of checks but white will come out on top if he/she defends accurately.} {%08DA}
20.Rxe5 Rxg2+ 21.Kf1 Bxf3 22.Rxh5 Bc6 23.Qb4 Rxf2+ 24.Ke1 d6
25.Rxh7 Rxf6 26.Rh8+ Kd7 27.Rxb8 Re6+ 28.Kd2 ) ( 19…Rxg2+ {?!}
{A tempting move that certainly gives white plenty of opportunities to blunder.
However, it’s just not accurate enough to be a legitimate alternative.} {%08DA}
20.Kxg2 Ne5 21.Qxd7+ {!} Kxd7 22.Bg6+ Ke6 23.Bxh5 Rg8+ 24.Kh3
N7g6 25.Bg4+ Kxf6 26.Nxe5 Nxe5 27.Be7+ Kxe7 28.Rxe5+ Kf6 29.Rf5+ )
( 19…d6 {?} {
This was once suggested by a student as a means of interfering with the scope
of the dangerous a3 bishop. This may be true but white will still get a winning game after this mistake.} {%08DA}
20.Be4 {!} Kf8 21.fxe7+ Nxe7 22.Bxb7 Qg6 23.Nh4 Qf6 24.Bf3 Ng6
25.Nxg6+ hxg6 26.Re2 Rh8 27.Qc6 Kg7 28.h3 Rh4 29.Bg4 {and white has a winning material advantage.}
) 20.Rxe7+ {!} Nxe7 {?} {Setting up one of the most beautiful mating combinations every played! White to move and mate in 4.}
( 20…Kd8 21.Rxd7+ {!} Kc8 22.Rd8+ {!} Kxd8 23.Be4+ Nd4 24.Bxf3
Bxf3 {Is painful but still preferable over being checkmated.} )
{%09DB} 21.Qxd7+ {!!} {%09DB} Kxd7 22.Bf5+ Ke8 23.Bd7+ Kf8 24.Bxe7# 1-0

Advertisements

My Favorite #Chess Games: The Opera House Game

June 12, 2018

The Opera House Game is perhaps the most famous chess game to have ever been played. It’s title is derived from the fact that the great American chess master Paul Morphy defeated the Duke Karl of Brunswick and the Count Isouard while all the parties involved were watching Norma being performed from the box seats at the Paris Opera House. I show this game several times a year to demonstrate the art of attacking in chess. Included below the game are my lesson notes.

 

paul-morphy-b283cfd9-dd4e-4a18-82cc-0d3c1c55ad2-resize-750

 

imb_s1xk6p

The Opera House Game

 

[Event “The Opera House Game”]
[Site “Paris (France)”]
[Date “1858”]
[Round “”]
[White “Morphy Paul”]
[Black “Duke Karl of Brunswick and the Count Isouard”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C41”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ PHILIDOR’S def.,C41] Morphy Paul +8 =1 -1 Duke Karl Count Isouard +0 =0 -1 Morphy Paul-Duke Karl Count Isouard +1 =0 -0}
1.e4 {Paul Morphy’s favorite way to start a game.} e5 2.Nf3 {Knights before bishops.}
d6 {Philidor’s Defense was quite popular during the time of Paul Morphy’s European
adventures and he was quite adept with either color of it.} {%08DA}
3.d4 {Paul Morphy choses to place a second pawn in the center. Of course, developing
a second piece with a move like Bc4 is also good.} Bg4 {?!} {
A questionable choice for black. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to bring
out a knight before the bishop. Here black could have played Nf6 or Nd7. Also
fine is exchanging pawns with exd4. Below are sample games for each move.}
( 3…exd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Be7 6.g3 d5 7.e5 Ng4 8.Bg2 O-O 9.Nxd5
Bc5 10.c3 c6 11.Ne3 Nxe5 12.O-O Re8 13.b4 Bb6 14.a4 a5 15.Bb2
Na6 16.bxa5 Bxa5 17.Qc2 Qf6 18.Rad1 Qg6 19.Be4 Qh5 20.c4 Nc5
21.Bg2 Bh3 22.f4 Bxg2 23.Kxg2 {…0-1, Carlsen Magnus (NOR) 2837 – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar (AZE) 2726 , Astana 7/10/2012 Ch World (blitz) (final)}
) ( 3…Nf6 4.Nc3 Nbd7 5.Bc4 Be7 6.O-O {?} ( 6.Bxf7+ Kxf7 7.Ng5+
$40 ) O-O 7.Qe2 c6 8.Bg5 ( {‘better is’} 8.a4 {‘better is’} )
h6 9.Bh4 Nh5 10.Bg3 Nxg3 11.hxg3 b5 12.Bd3 a6 13.a4 Bb7 14.Rad1
Qc7 15.axb5 axb5 16.g4 Rfe8 17.d5 b4 18.dxc6 Bxc6 19.Nb1 Nc5
20.Nbd2 Qc8 21.Bc4 g6 ( 21…Qxg4 22.Bxf7+ {!} $18 ) 22.g3 Kg7
23.Nh2 Bg5 24.f3 Qc7 25.Rfe1 Rh8 26.Ndf1 h5 27.gxh5 Rxh5 28.Bd5
Rah8 29.Bxc6 Qxc6 30.Qc4 Qb6 31.Kg2 Ne6 32.Re2 Nd4 33.Ree1 Qb7
{!} 34.Rxd4 ( 34.c3 bxc3 35.bxc3 ( 35.Qxc3 Rc8 $41 ) Qb2+ $19 )
exd4 35.Ng4 ( 35.Qxd4+ Bf6 36.Qxd6 Rd8 ) Qb6 36.f4 Be7 37.Rd1
f5 38.Nf2 fxe4 39.Qxd4+ Qxd4 40.Rxd4 d5 41.g4 Bc5 {!} 42.Rd1
Rh4 43.Rxd5 Bxf2 44.Kxf2 Rxg4 45.Ke3 Rc8 46.Kxe4 Rc4+ 47.Kd3
Rcxf4 48.Ne3 Rg3 49.Re5 Kf6 50.Re8 Kf7 51.Re5 Rf6 52.c4 b3 53.Ke4
Re6 54.Rxe6 Kxe6 55.Nd5 g5 {0-1, Teichmann Richard (GER) – Nimzowitsch Aaron, San Sebastian 1911 It}
) ( 3…Nd7 4.Bc4 c6 5.dxe5 dxe5 6.Be3 Be7 7.Nc3 Qc7 {‘better is’ Ng8-f6, 0-0, Rf8-e8}
8.a4 Nc5 9.b4 {?} ( {‘better is’} 9.Ng5 {‘better is’} Nh6 10.h3
{!} {=} ) Ne6 10.Rb1 Nf6 11.O-O O-O 12.Ne1 ( 12.Ba2 {!?} )
( 12.Be2 {!?} {(B) Alekhin} ) b5 {!} 13.Bb3 a5 14.axb5
( 14.bxa5 b4 15.Ne2 Qxa5 $17 ) axb4 {} $17 {} 15.b6 Qb7 16.Ne2
c5 17.c3 {!} Bd7 ( 17…Nxe4 {?!} 18.cxb4 cxb4 19.Nc2 {=} ) 18.cxb4
cxb4 19.Ng3 Nc5 20.Bc4 Ncxe4 21.Nxe4 Nxe4 22.Bd5 ( 22.Qd5 $13
Bc6 ( 22…Qxd5 23.Bxd5 Nc3 24.Bxa8 Nxb1 25.Be4 ) 23.Qxe5 Bd6
24.Qf5 Rae8 {} ) Bc6 23.Bxc6 Qxc6 24.Qh5 Nc3 $18 25.Rb2 Qb5 {!}
26.Nf3 ( 26.g3 Ra1 $18 ) Ne2+ 27.Rxe2 Qxe2 28.Qxe5 Bf6 29.Qc5
b3 30.Bf4 Rfe8 {!} 31.b7 Qxf1+ 32.Kxf1 Ra1+ 33.Bc1 b2 {0-1, Von Bardeleben Kurt (GER) – Alekhine Alexander A (RUS), Dusseldorf 1908 It}
) 4.dxe5 {Paul Morphy aims to punish his opponents’ last move.}
Bxf3 {Practically forced because otherwise:} ( 4…dxe5 5.Qxd8+
Kxd8 6.Nxe5 Be6 {and black is a pawn down and has lost their right to castle.}
) 5.Qxf3 {It is fine for Morphy to develop his queen to f3 as it does not block the
already exchanged knight that originated on g1. However, this didn’t stop
Steinitz from criticizing Morphy play here. Steinitz, who enjoyed finding
“mistakes” in Morphy’s games suggested the following:}
( 5.gxf3 dxe5 6.Qxd8+ Kxd8 7.f4 Nf6 8.fxe5 Nxe4 9.Bg2 Nc5 10.b4
{This is obviously good for white but history prefers Morphy’s method.}
) {%09DB} dxe5 {An interesting position where both sides have one pawn in the center and active queens.} {%09DB}
6.Bc4 {White develops with a Scholar’s Mate style threat. However, here Morphy’s
success is not dependent on poor play from his opponent as is the case with the actual Scholar’s Mate.}
Nf6 7.Qb3 {!} {A very powerful move which threatens both the pawn on b7 and the belly-button.}
Qe7 {The Duke and the Count wisely decide to defend the pawn that is attached to their king safety.}
8.Nc3 {Paul Morphy had three good choices here. The butcher’s choice would be to play
“8. Qxb7 Qb4+ 9. Qxb4 Bxb4” and grind out a long endgame victory. A robot could
evaluate 8. Bxf7+ as best and win in a cold fashion. However, it took Paul
Morphy to recognize that 8. Nc3 was the only move with potential to make the game a true artistic masterpiece.}
( 8.Qxb7 Qb4+ 9.Qxb4 Bxb4+ 10.Bd2 Bxd2+ 11.Nxd2 O-O 12.f3 Nc6
13.c3 Rab8 14.O-O-O Na5 15.Be2 h6 16.Nc4 Nxc4 17.Bxc4 Rb6 18.Rd2
Rc6 19.Bb3 a5 20.Rhd1 a4 21.Bxa4 Ra6 22.Bb3 c5 23.Rd8 Ne8 24.R1d7
Rf6 25.Bc4 g6 26.a4 Ng7 27.a5 Nh5 {…1-0, Kunte Abhijit (IND) 2517 – Akshay Vijayan (IND) 1766 , Jalgaon 11/23/2010 It (open)}
) ( 8.Bxf7+ Qxf7 9.Qxb7 Bc5 10.O-O O-O 11.Qxa8 c6 12.Nc3 Qc7
13.Nd5 cxd5 14.exd5 Qb6 15.Be3 Ng4 16.Bxc5 Qxc5 17.b4 Qb6 18.c4
Na6 19.Qc6 Qxc6 20.dxc6 Nxb4 21.h3 Nf6 22.c7 Rc8 23.Rab1 Na6
24.Rb7 Rxc7 25.Rxc7 Nxc7 26.Rb1 a6 27.Rb7 Nfe8 28.f3 Kf7 29.Kf2
Ke7 30.Ke3 Kd7 31.Rb2 Kc6 32.Kd3 Ne6 33.Rc2 Nd6 34.Rb2 Nc5+ 35.Ke2
Nxc4 36.Rb8 Kd5 37.Rd8+ Nd6 38.Rg8 Nf5 39.g4 Nd4+ 40.Ke3 Nde6
41.h4 h6 42.Rb8 Kc4 43.Rb6 Nf4 44.Kf2 a5 45.Rb8 Ncd3+ 46.Kg3
Kd4 47.Ra8 Ke3 48.Rxa5 Ne2+ 49.Kg2 Ne1+ 50.Kf1 Nxf3 51.Ra3+ Kf4
52.Kxe2 Nxh4 53.Ra4+ Kg3 54.Rb4 Ng6 55.Rb7 Nf4+ 56.Ke3 Nd5+ 57.Kd3
Kxg4 58.Rxg7+ Kf5 59.a4 e4+ 60.Kd4 Nb4 61.Rf7+ Ke6 62.Rh7 Kf5
63.Rxh6 Nc2+ 64.Kc3 Ne3 65.a5 Kf4 66.a6 Ng4 67.Rh4 e3 68.Kd3
{1-0, Moeller Stefan – Hertel-Mach Frank, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern 12/11/2005 Landesliga 2005/06}
) c6 {Now the black queen defends her pawn on b7. Additionally, the pawn on c6 guards
d5 and b5 from being accessed by Morphy’s knight, bishop or queen.
Unfortunately, it is also another slow pawn move for black which gives Morphy
an opportunity to add to his lead in development.} 9.Bg5 {
Momentarily stopped on the queenside, Morphy deploys another piece. Now he has
four pieces in the game versus a pinned knight and an oddly placed queen.}
b5 {?} {This is overly ambitious. Even players well below Morphy’s level would not
hesitate to sacrifice the knight for two pawns and the check.}
( 9…Na6 {Is an improvement over the move the Duke and the Count played.}
10.Bxa6 bxa6 11.O-O Qb4 {Black has prospects to enter a difficult endgame against white.}
) {%09DB} 10.Nxb5 {Of course Paul Morphy does not retreat his bishop.} {%09DB}
cxb5 11.Bxb5+ {The Queen could also capture on b5 with check but why use a $9 piece to do the work of a $3 piece?}
Nbd7 {The Duke and the Count must block with the knight as stepping into the open file with the king would be suicide.}
( 11…Kd8 12.O-O-O+ Kc8 13.Rd3 ) 12.O-O-O {Castling queenside adds the rook’s power to the pinned knight on d7.} {%08DA}
Rd8 {The Duke and Count place the rook on d8 because Knight on f6 and Queen on e7
are not really defending d7. Black’s King is in full turtle mode.}
13.Rxd7 {!} {Paul Morphy fires the cannon for the first time!}
Rxd7 {The only logical response.} 14.Rd1 {Paul Morphy takes advantage of the fact that Black’s rook on d7 is pinned and reloads the cannon.} {%08DA}
Qe6 {This move does a lot of good things for black. First, it threatens to trade
queens and thus take the heat off of the black king. Second, it unpins the
knight on f6 while still having the queen defend the rook on d7. Thirdly, it
creates a roadway for the bishop on f8 and thus gives the black king an escape
rout by castling. Unfortunately for the Duke and the Count, it does not work.}
15.Bxd7+ {!} {The start of a beautiful combination.} Nxd7 {%08DA}
16.Qb8+ {!!} {The shot heard round the world.} Nxb8 17.Rd8# {Paul Morphy only has the bishop and the rook but in the end, that was all that he needed.}
1-0

 

 

Don’t Bring Your Queen Out Too Early

June 8, 2018

Here is a game I played last week against a new student that clearly illustrates the dangers of bringing the queen out too early. I gave my young opponent a three move start with the white pieces and he played 1. e4, 2. Bc4 and 3. Qh5. After blocking the attempted Scholars Mate, I develop easily while chasing his queen around the board. Subsequently, the queen ends up trapped after being moved six times in the opening.

imb_rqe9xn-3

 

TCAMA Summer Chess Skills Development Programs for Summer 2018

June 8, 2018

Don’t let your child spend another month stuck at their current rating level! Help them to grow in chess and prepare for success.

 

In one week of training with Chris Torres your child will gain:

  • The Valuable tools and skills needed to excel as a chess player.
  • An extraordinary chess camp experience with a top-tier chess instructor.
  • The confidence and motivation necessary to surpass their chess goals and fast track improvement.

 

Chris Torres has been teaching chess in the Bay Area since 1998. For 20 years his meticulous approach has paved the way for the success of his students regardless of their entry skill level. A true leader in California chess, Chris Torres creates unique a curriculum perfectly suited for each and every class he teaches. View his resume here: https://chessmusings.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/chris-torres-chess-resume/

 

The Torres Chess and Music Academy’s week-long chess skills development program helps equip elementary and middle school aged chess players with the ideal balance of foundational skills and advanced knowledge necessary to achieve sustainable improvement in chess. Sign up for these chess camps and get connected with the leading chess coach who is passionate about creating winners in every student he teaches. Classes are limited to just 10 students so every child receives personal attention. Each week long program is only $150!

Program Dates Times Location Address
P1 June 25-29 3:30 to 6:30 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P2 July 9-13 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P3 July 9-13 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P4 July 16-20 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P5 July 16-20 4:00 to 7:00 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P6 July 23-27 1:00 to 4:00 Pleasanton 4460 Black Ave., Suite A, Pleasanton
P7 July 30-Aug 3 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P8 July 30-Aug 3 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont
P9 August 6-10 12:30 to 3:30 Newark 34904 Newark Blvd., Newark
P10 August 6-10 4:00 to 7:00 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P11 August 13-17 12:30 to 3:30 Warm Springs 46517 Mission Blvd., Fremont
P12 August 13-17 4:00 to 7:00 Fremont Hub 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont

Please contact Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com if you have any questions. Checks should be made payable to the TCAMA 16691 Colonial Trail, Lathrop, CA, 95330, OR visit http://www.chessandmusic.com to register online.

For more information on Nurture Kids (510) 364-9322 http://www.wenurturekids.com

Kevin Pan is Brilliant at 2018 USCF Elementary Championships

May 19, 2018

Round 7: Drew Justice vs. Kevin Pan

It is always my great pleasure to share the stories and achievements of California’s most outstanding young chess talents. Below is a remarkably brilliant game played by Mission San Jose Elementary School’s own Kevin Pan in route to a National Championship title both for Kevin and the MSJE Chess Team.

[Event “USCF National Elementary Championships”]
[Site “Nashville, TN”]
[Date “2018.5.13”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Pan, Kevin”]
[Black “Justice, Drew”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “B18”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ CARO-KANN,B18]}

1.e4 c6

2.d4 d5

3.Nc3 dxe4

4.Nxe4 Bf5

5.Ng3 Bg6

6.N1e2 {Kevin avoids the old stodgy 6. h4 line in favor of creating early complications for Drew. Mikhail Tal would be pleased…}

Pan-Justice1

Position after 6. N1e2

6… e6

7.Nf4 Bd6

8.Ngh5 {“Genius is initiative on fire!”-Holbrook Jackson}

( 8.c3 Qh4 9.Ngh5 Bxh5 10.Qxh5 Qxh5 11.Nxh5 g6 12.Bf4 Bxf4 13.Nxf4
Nf6 14.Nd3 Nbd7 15.g3 O-O 16.Bg2 Rfc8 17.a4 a5 18.Kd2 Kf8 19.Rhb1
Nb6 20.Nc5 Rc7 21.b4 Nfd5 22.bxa5 Nc4+ 23.Kd3 Nxa5 24.c4 Ne7
25.Bh3 Kg8 {1/2-1/2, Polgar Judit (HUN) 2665 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2795 , Haifa 1998 It (active)})

Pan-Justice2

Position after 8. Ngh5

8… Bxf4 {8…Bxh5 and Kf8 seem less tricky from black’s persepective.}

( 8…Bxh5 9.Nxh5 g6 10.Ng3 Nf6 11.Bc4 Nbd7 12.c3 Bf8 13.O-O
Bg7 14.Re1 O-O 15.Bg5 h6 16.Bf4 Nd5 17.Bd6 Re8 18.Bb3 Bf8 19.Ne4
N5f6 20.Bxf8 Rxf8 21.Qf3 Nxe4 22.Rxe4 Nf6 23.Re5 Kg7 24.Rae1
Nd5 25.g3 Qf6 26.Qg4 Rh8 27.h4 h5 28.Qe4 {…0-1, Guido Flavio (ITA) 2405 – Zelcic Robert (CRO) 2554 , Schwarzach 8/25/2012 It (open)})

( 8…Kf8 9.c3 Nd7 10.Qf3 Ngf6 11.Nxf6 Qxf6 12.Be2 Bc2 13.Qg4
Bf5 14.Qf3 Re8 15.Nh5 Qg6 16.Ng3 Bc2 17.Qg4 Qxg4 18.Bxg4 Nf6
19.Bd1 Bxd1 20.Kxd1 h5 21.f3 h4 22.Ne2 e5 23.h3 exd4 24.Nxd4
c5 25.Nf5 Bc7 26.Re1 Rd8+ 27.Kc2 Nh5 28.Ne3 {…0-1, Vydeslaver Alik (ISR) 2404 – Shengelia Davit (AUT) 2569 , Barcelona 8/29/2007 It (open)})

9.Nxf4 Ne7

( 9…Nf6 10.Nxg6 hxg6 11.Be2 Nbd7 12.c3 Qc7 13.g3
c5 14.O-O Rd8 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.Qc2 O-O 17.Be3 Nd5 18.Bd4 e5 19.Bxc5
Qxc5 20.Bf3 f5 21.Bxd5+ Rxd5 22.Qb3 Rfd8 23.Qxb7 e4 24.b4 Qc4
25.Qxa7 f4 26.gxf4 Rd3 27.Qc5 Qe6 28.Qg5 R8d5 29.Qg2 {…1-0, Finkel Alexander (ISR) 2455 – Adianto Utut (INA) 2610 , Bastia 1998 It (open) (active)})

10.h4 {Kevin will not stop applying pressure.}

( 10.c3 Qc7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.g3 c5 13.Bb5+ Nbc6 14.dxc5 Qe5+ 15.Be3 Nf5 16.Qf3
Nxe3 17.Bxc6+ Ke7 18.Bxb7 Nc4+ 19.Qe4 Rab8 20.Qxe5 Nxe5 21.c6
Nd3+ 22.Ke2 Nxb2 23.Rab1 Na4 24.c7 {1-0, Karpatchev Aleksandr (RUS) 2469 – Berg Peter (DEN) 2017 , Esbjerg 7/13/2007 Cup North Sea (open)})

10… h6

11.Nxg6 {And these two extremely talented combatants are discovering new territory in an old opening.}

11… Nxg6

12.h5 {In these kinds of positions you might as well push the pawn forward one more square to force the black knight to retreat.}

Pan-Justice3

Position after 12. h5

12… Ne7

13.Qg4 {Which in turn allows the queen to develop with threats.}

13… Nf5 {Black’s knight must provide protection to g7.}

14.Bd3 {Unfortunately for Drew Justice, the knight on f5 is also an easy target.}

14… Qxd4 {?} {Kevin Pan’s constant pressure finally causes Drew Justice to crack. 14…Nd7 and 14…0-0 are much better choices for black.}
( 14…Nd7 15.Bxf5 Qa5+ 16.c3 Qxf5 17.Qxg7 O-O-O )
( 14…O-O 15.c3 Nd7 )

Pan-Justice4

Position after 14… Qxd4?

15.Bxf5 {!} {Kevin spots the tactical punishment for Drew’s inaccuracy.}

15… Qe5+

16.Be4 f5

17.Qg6+ {Scissors beat paper and checks beat fork.}

17… Ke7

18.Be3 Nd7

19.O-O-O fxe4 {?}

( 19…Rag8 )

Pan-Justice5

Position after 19… fxe4?

20.Rxd7+{!} {It’s moves like these that win national championships!}

20… Kxd7

21.Qf7+ Kc8

22.Bf4 {Black resigns and Kevin Pan is a National Champion!}
1-0

Pan-Justice6

Position after 22. Bf4

 

 

Game pgn:

[Event “USCF National Elementary Championships”]
[Site “Nashville, TN”]
[Date “2018.5.13”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Pan, Kevin”]
[Black “Justice, Drew”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “B18”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ CARO-KANN,B18]} 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5 5.Ng3
Bg6 6.N1e2 {Kevin avoids the old stodgy 6. h4 line in favor of creating early complications for Drew. Mikhail Tal would be pleased…} {%08DA}
e6 7.Nf4 Bd6 8.Ngh5 {“Genius is initiative on fire!”-Holbrook Jackson}
( 8.c3 Qh4 9.Ngh5 Bxh5 10.Qxh5 Qxh5 11.Nxh5 g6 12.Bf4 Bxf4 13.Nxf4
Nf6 14.Nd3 Nbd7 15.g3 O-O 16.Bg2 Rfc8 17.a4 a5 18.Kd2 Kf8 19.Rhb1
Nb6 20.Nc5 Rc7 21.b4 Nfd5 22.bxa5 Nc4+ 23.Kd3 Nxa5 24.c4 Ne7
25.Bh3 Kg8 {1/2-1/2, Polgar Judit (HUN) 2665 – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2795 , Haifa 1998 It (active)}
) {%09DB} Bxf4 {8…Bxh5 and Kf8 seem less tricky from black’s persepective.} {%09DB}
( 8…Bxh5 9.Nxh5 g6 10.Ng3 Nf6 11.Bc4 Nbd7 12.c3 Bf8 13.O-O
Bg7 14.Re1 O-O 15.Bg5 h6 16.Bf4 Nd5 17.Bd6 Re8 18.Bb3 Bf8 19.Ne4
N5f6 20.Bxf8 Rxf8 21.Qf3 Nxe4 22.Rxe4 Nf6 23.Re5 Kg7 24.Rae1
Nd5 25.g3 Qf6 26.Qg4 Rh8 27.h4 h5 28.Qe4 {…0-1, Guido Flavio (ITA) 2405 – Zelcic Robert (CRO) 2554 , Schwarzach 8/25/2012 It (open)}
) ( 8…Kf8 9.c3 Nd7 10.Qf3 Ngf6 11.Nxf6 Qxf6 12.Be2 Bc2 13.Qg4
Bf5 14.Qf3 Re8 15.Nh5 Qg6 16.Ng3 Bc2 17.Qg4 Qxg4 18.Bxg4 Nf6
19.Bd1 Bxd1 20.Kxd1 h5 21.f3 h4 22.Ne2 e5 23.h3 exd4 24.Nxd4
c5 25.Nf5 Bc7 26.Re1 Rd8+ 27.Kc2 Nh5 28.Ne3 {…0-1, Vydeslaver Alik (ISR) 2404 – Shengelia Davit (AUT) 2569 , Barcelona 8/29/2007 It (open)}
) 9.Nxf4 Ne7 ( 9…Nf6 10.Nxg6 hxg6 11.Be2 Nbd7 12.c3 Qc7 13.g3
c5 14.O-O Rd8 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.Qc2 O-O 17.Be3 Nd5 18.Bd4 e5 19.Bxc5
Qxc5 20.Bf3 f5 21.Bxd5+ Rxd5 22.Qb3 Rfd8 23.Qxb7 e4 24.b4 Qc4
25.Qxa7 f4 26.gxf4 Rd3 27.Qc5 Qe6 28.Qg5 R8d5 29.Qg2 {…1-0, Finkel Alexander (ISR) 2455 – Adianto Utut (INA) 2610 , Bastia 1998 It (open) (active)}
) 10.h4 {Kevin will not stop applying pressure.} ( 10.c3 Qc7
11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.g3 c5 13.Bb5+ Nbc6 14.dxc5 Qe5+ 15.Be3 Nf5 16.Qf3
Nxe3 17.Bxc6+ Ke7 18.Bxb7 Nc4+ 19.Qe4 Rab8 20.Qxe5 Nxe5 21.c6
Nd3+ 22.Ke2 Nxb2 23.Rab1 Na4 24.c7 {1-0, Karpatchev Aleksandr (RUS) 2469 – Berg Peter (DEN) 2017 , Esbjerg 7/13/2007 Cup North Sea (open)}
) h6 11.Nxg6 {And these two exteremely talented combatants are discovering new territory in an old opening.}
Nxg6 12.h5 {In these kinds of positions you might as well push the pawn forward one more square to force the black knight to retreat.} {%08DA}
Ne7 13.Qg4 {Which in turn allows the queen to develop with threats.}
Nf5 {Black’s knight must provide prtotection to g7.} 14.Bd3 {Unfortunately for Drew Justice, the knight on f5 is also an easy target.}
Qxd4 {?} {Kevin Pan’s constant pressure finally causes Drew Justice to crack. 14…Nd7 and 14…0-0 are much better choices for black.}
( 14…Nd7 15.Bxf5 Qa5+ 16.c3 Qxf5 17.Qxg7 O-O-O )
( 14…O-O 15.c3 Nd7 ) {%09DB} 15.Bxf5 {!} {Kevin spots the tactical punishment for Drew’s inaccuracy.} {%09DB}
Qe5+ 16.Be4 f5 17.Qg6+ {Scissors beat paper and checks beat fork.}
Ke7 18.Be3 Nd7 19.O-O-O fxe4 {?} ( 19…Rag8 ) {%09DB} 20.Rxd7+
{!} {It’s moves like these that win national championships!} {%09DB}
Kxd7 21.Qf7+ Kc8 22.Bf4 {Black resigns and Kevin Pan is a National Champion!}
1-0

MSJE Chess Team Again Wins Big at Nationals!

May 17, 2018

Coach Joe’s Report on the 2018 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships (Photos by Hui Wang):

On the weekend of May 11th to 13th more than 2200 Elementary school students competed in the National Elementary School Chess Championships in Nashville, TN. This was the tenth straight year that a strong group of Mission San Jose Elementary School (MSJE) chess players traveled from Fremont, California to attend these championships and once again they brought back an impressive collection of plaques and trophies.

The overall elementary school championship is the K-6 Championship section. MSJE has won this section three times in the last five years (2013, 2015, & 2016) and four times in the past nine years (also 2009). We decided to arrange our players to maximize the chances of winning this section again. This meant moving our two top fifth graders (Aghilan Nachiappan and Allyson Wong) into K-6.  This move left us without a full team in K-5, but our two second grade stars (Kavya Meiyappan and Jason Liu) agreed to move up and play in K-5 since we did not have a full team in K-3.  (Four players is a full team.  The team score is the sum of the scores of the top four players on the team.

This left us with a K-6 team with one super star and five very strong players and a K-5 team that had a reasonable shot at a top 10 finish.

We have had a great K-1 team and I fully expected them to finish in first. I was confident enough to mention this to Chuck Graves, the MSJE principal.  MSJE won K-1 in 2012 and this team was certainly stronger than our 2012 team.

As high as my expectations were for our K-1 team the team actually exceeded expectations.  They got off to a fast start and were never in any place but first.  There were 154 players in the K-1 section.  Only six players scored six or more points.  Our top three players Artham Pawar, Lucas Jiang, and Arnam Pawar all scored 6 out of seven.  Adirya Arutla scored 5/7, Sagwartha Selvan scored 3.5/7.  Sarvesh Maniv also competed for our K-1 team.  This team won by 4.5 points which is a gigantic margin. They could have not shown up for the seventh round and still won first place.

Our K-6 team was locked in a brutal battle with three powerhouse schools form New York all weekend. They went into the last round a half point behind Speyer and a half point ahead of Dalton. These are both perennial scholastic chess powerhouses.  Kevin Pan, our top player, with 5/6 was in a battle of the individual championship.  We gained a half point on Speyer, Dalton gained a half point on us and we ended up in a three-way tie for first place.  Kevin won his game and ended up in a tie for first place.

Our K-5 team of Kavya Meiyappan, (4/7) Ayan Kassamali, (3.5/7) Jason Liu (3/7) and Jolene Liu (2.5/7) tied for seventh place.  Zahaan Kassamali also competed in K-3 (4.5/7).

Congratulations to the chess team for a great result at the National Championships.

MSJE Chess Coaches: Joe Lonsdale, Meiyaps Sathappan, Terry and Cathy Liu, Hui Wang, Nachi Nachiappan, Chris Torres

New Chess Club Starting in Fremont

April 12, 2018

1374182_10151787887318611_113356610_n

New Chess Club Starting in Fremont

Where: Nurture Kids, 160 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont, CA 94538

When: April 14th through June 16th

Saturdays 11:00 AM – 1: 00 PM

Who: Open to all youth tournament chess players.

Instructor is Chris Torres!

Click on the application below to register online.

img_5744

Mission San Jose Elementary School Shines at the Calchess Scholastic Chess Championships

April 11, 2018

Coach Joe’ Report on the 2018 Calchess Scholastic State Championships (Photography by Hui Wang):

The 2018 Northern California Scholastic Chess Championships were held the weekend of April 7th & 8th at the Santa Clara convention center. Over 1200 students and more the 50 schools competed in these championships.  Mission San Jose Elementary school (MSJE) of Fremont was the big winner in the Elementary School Division. The MSJE Chess Team won two of the three major elementary school sections (K-3 & K-6) and Kevin Pan won the overall individual elementary school championship.

The top elementary school section at these championships is the K-6 Championship Division. Kevin Pan scored five wins in six rounds and took the first-place trophy. Other members of the MSJE team were Stephen He (4/6), Nicholas Jiang (4/6), Aidan Chen (3.5/6), and Nivedha Maniv (3/6). In the fourth round Aidan Chen won a critical game versus Weibel. This was the eighth straight year that MSJE has taken home the first place trophy in K-6.

The K-5 Championship section is the second highest elementary school section at the State Scholastic Chess Championships. This section was created in 2007 to give elementary schools without a grade 6 a fair chance to win a championship section. MSJE has won this section every year since it was created. Both MSJE and Weibel entered strong teams in the K5 Championship section. The MSJE team was led by Aghilan Nachiappan (5/6 2nd place) and Allyson Wong (4.5/6 8th place). The Weibel team scored 17 points and beat the MSJE team (16.5) by the smallest possible margin. Other top scorers on the MSJE K-5 team were Viabhav Wudaru (3.5/6 #19), Siddharth Arulta (3.5/6 #21) Arnav Lingannagari (3.5/6 #24), and Ayaan Kassamali (3.5/6 #27).  Jolene Liu, Saidivy Tunguturu, Aditya Sujay, Vividh Goenka, Mihit Puvvula, and Arna Gupta also competed for our K-5 team.

The K-3 Championship section is often called the primary school championship.  MSJE won the first-place team trophy in this section every year since 2008. In 2018 MSJE once again took home the first-place trophy in K-3 Championship.  Our K-3 team was led by first grader Lucas Jiang (4.5/6 #4), third grader Kayden jiang (4/6 #9) Jason Liu (3.5/6 #14) and Aditya Arulta (3.5/6 #19).  First graders Artham Pawar and Arnam Pawar also competed for our championship K-3 team.

MSJE also did very well in the other sections.  Isha Vanungare, Sarvesh Maniv, and Aditya Vanungare competed in the Kindergarten section and took home the third-place team trophy.  Neil Kumar, Prisha Agarwal, Pranav Rajit, Ranga Ramanujam, Edward Zeng, Dhritee Desia, Ashwin Jagan, Ruthvik Arumalla, SHreeya Hule, Shrihan Bolla, Kerrthana Gudi, and Aaditya Bisht competed in the K-3 beginner section.  Allen Yang, Swagatha Selvam, Pratyush Hule,  Ashwin Marimuthu, Zahaan Kassamali, Avkash Panwar, and Meghana Satish competed in the K-3 JV section.  Ardash Swamy, Nityasri Kolta, Maurya Arumalla and Pratyush Hule competed in the K-6 JV  section.

Congratulations to the Chess team for a great showing at the State championships.

Chess Coaches: Joe Lonsdale, Terry & Cathy Liu, Meiyaps Sathappan, Nachi Aghilan, and Chris Torres

#Chess Lesson of the Week: Fabiano Caruana vs. Robert Hess II (Argentina, 2001)

April 1, 2018

Big Thanks to Robert Hess for allowing me to share his Facebook post on this blog!

 

After seeing Robert Hess II’s post on Facebook, I became curious about his chess adventures with Fabiano Caruana in Argentina. After a quick search of my database, I found this superb chess game played by the two young chess prodigies. Below is the lesson from the game that I have prepared for my students this week.

[Event “Ch Pan-American”]
[Site “Guaymallen (Argentina)”]
[Date “2001”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Caruana, Fabiano (USA)”]
[Black “Hess, Robert L (USA)”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C57”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “”]

{[ TWO KNIGHTS’ def.,C57] Caruana Fabiano +1 =0 -0 Hess Robert L (USA) +0 =0 -1 Caruana Fabiano-Hess Robert L (USA) +1 =0 -0}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Bc4 Nf6

4.Ng5 d5

5.exd5 Nd4 {Robert Hess chooses the double-edged Fritz Variation.}

( 5…Nxd5 6.Nxf7 {The original Fried Liver Attack.} Kxf7 7.Qf3+
Ke6 8.Nc3 Nce7 9.d4 c6 10.Bg5 h6 11.Bxe7 Bxe7 12.O-O-O Rf8 13.Qe4
Rxf2 14.dxe5 Bg5+ 15.Kb1 Rd2 16.h4 Rxd1+ 17.Rxd1 Bxh4 18.Nxd5
cxd5 19.Rxd5 Qg5 20.Rd6+ Ke7 21.Rg6 {1-0, Polerio G – Dominiko V, Rome 1602})

Fabi-Hess1

Position after 5… Nd4

6.c3 b5

7.cxd4 {Another American chess prodigy preferred 7. Bf1 which is the main line.}

( 7.Bf1 Nxd5 8.cxd4 Qxg5 9.Bxb5+ Kd8 10.Qf3 e4 11.Qxe4 Bd6 12.O-O
Bb7 13.d3 Nf4 14.Bxf4 Qxb5 15.d5 Qxb2 16.Bxd6 cxd6 17.Re1 Qf6
18.Nc3 Rc8 19.Qb4 Re8 20.Qa5+ Kd7 21.Qa4+ {1-0, Fischer Robert J (USA) 2780 – NN (ITA), Montreal 1964 Simultan})

Fabi-Hess2

Position after 7. cxd4

7… bxc4

8.dxe5 Qxd5

9.exf6

( 9.O-O Bb7 10.Nf3 Nd7 11.Re1 O-O-O 12.Nc3 Qd3 13.Re3 Qg6 14.d4 cxd3 15.Rxd3 Bc5
16.Nd5 Qe4 17.Bg5 f6 18.exf6 gxf6 19.Be3 Rhg8 20.Ne1 Ne5 21.Bxc5
Bxd5 22.Rg3 Rxg3 23.hxg3 Bb7 24.Qb3 Nd3 25.Qc2 Nxc5 26.Qxc5 Re8
27.Nf3 Qc6 28.Qxa7 Qc2 {…1-0, Bollek Jan – Godena Michele (ITA) 2527 , Caorle 1982 It (open)})

( 9.Nf3 {?!} {Seems to favor black.} Qe4+ 10.Qe2
( 10.Kf1 Qd3+ 11.Kg1 Nd7 ) Qxe2+ 11.Kxe2 Nd5 )

Fabi-Hess3

Position after 9. exf6

9… Qxg5

10.Qe2+

( 10.Qf3 Rb8 11.O-O Qxf6 12.Re1+ Be7 13.Qxf6 gxf6 14.b3
cxb3 15.axb3 Rxb3 16.Ba3 Be6 17.Bxe7 Kxe7 18.f4 Kd7 19.Rxa7 Rb2
20.Rc1 Kd6 21.Nc3 f5 22.d4 c6 23.Ra6 Rc8 24.Ra5 Rd2 25.Ra6 Ke7
26.Ra4 Rd8 27.Ra7+ Kf6 28.Ra6 R8xd4 29.g3 Rc4 30.Ra3 Kg6 31.Raa1
Rb4 32.Rd1 Rc2 33.Rac1 Rbb2 34.Rxc2 Rxc2 35.Rd3 Kf6 36.h3 Ke7
37.Nd1 c5 38.Rc3 Rxc3 39.Nxc3 c4 40.Kf2 Kd6 41.Ke3 Kc5 42.Ne2
h5 43.Nc3 Kb4 44.Kd2 Kc5 45.Ke3 Bd5 46.Ne2 Bg2 47.h4 Kb4 48.Kd2
Bf1 49.Nc3 Bd3 50.Nd1 Kc5 51.Ke3 Bc2 52.Nc3 Bd3 53.Nd1 Kb4 54.Kd2
Kb3 55.Nc3 Be4 56.Ne2 Kb4 57.Nc3 Kc5 58.Ke3 Bc2 59.Ne2 Bd3 60.Nc3
Kb4 61.Kd2 Kb3 62.Nd1 Be4 63.Nc3 Bf3 64.Nb1 Kb2 65.Nc3 Kb3 66.Nb1
Kb4 67.Nc3 Bg4 68.Nb1 Kc5 69.Ke3 {1/2-1/2, Paramzina Anastasya (RUS) 1830 – Sunyasakta Satpathy (IND) 1899, Porto Carras (Greece) 2010.10.24})

10… Be6

11.Qe4 Rb8

12.O-O Qxf6 {Fabiano Caruana and Robert Hess are dead even in a position with some serious imbalances.}

Fabi-Hess4

Position after 12… Qxf6

13.Qc6+ {Fabiano takes away black’s ability to castle.}

13… Kd8 {Robert Hess has an exposed king but much better development.}

14.Nc3 Bd6

15.g3 {?!} {Fearing black’s tactics on h2, Caruana plays g3 which is dangerously slow in such a sharp position. Better was:}
( 15.Ne4 Qd4 16.Nxd6 Qxd6 17.Qe4 {Which forces black to exchange his dangerous dark bishop.})

15… h5 {!} {Robert Hess launches his h-pawn toward the newly created weakness and in doing so activates his final piece.}

Fabi-Hess5

Position after 15… h5

16.h4 {Fabiano’s best defense creates even more weak squares around his king.}
( 16.Ne4 {??} {No longer works.} Qf3 {!} 17.h4 Bh3 )

16… Qd4 {Threatening Bxg3.}

17.Qe4 {Fabiano’s strongest move which leaves Robert Hess with a complicated choice as to how to continue his attack.}

17… Qf6 {?!} {Placing the queen on the same diagonal as his king was not the best choice. Better was:} ( 17…Bc5 18.d3 {I’m sure Fabiano would’ve been willing to temporarily lose some material to obtain must needed development.}
cxd3 19.Bf4 Rxb2 20.Be5 Qxe4 21.Nxe4 Rc2 22.Bxg7 Rg8 23.Nxc5
Rxc5 24.Bh6 Bg4 {and it’s black who is playing for a win.} )

Fabi-Hess6

Position after 17… Qf6

18.d3 {!} {Fabiano takes the initiative by threatening to play Bg5!}

18… Qe5

19.dxc4 Qxe4

20.Nxe4 Bxc4 {?}

{Hess wins a pawn and attacks Caruana’s rook. However, Caruana can respond by
playing Nxd6! which threatens Nxf7+ forking Hess’ king and rook. An improvement
for black would have been playing 20… Be5 which creates a threat and preserves the bishop pair for the ensuing endgame.}
( 20…Be5 21.Rb1 ( 21.Re1 Re8 22.Rb1 Bxc4 ) Bxc4 )

Fabi-Hess7

Position after 20… Bxc4

21.Nxd6 {!} {Removing the bishop pair and threatening Nxf7+.}

21… cxd6

22.Rd1 {Fabiano develops his rook with a threat.}

22… Kc7 {?}

{Chess can be so brutal. Had Hess played his king to the adjacent square the result of the game would have been much different.}
( 22…Kd7 23.Bf4 Rb6 24.Rd2 Be6 25.Rc1 Ra8 {and black is fine.} )

Fabi-Hess8

Position after 22… Kc7

23.Bf4 {!}

{Developing the bishop to a diagonal that threatens a pawn with a pin to the king and the king with a skewer to the rook.}

23… Rhd8 {?} {Robert Hess tries in vain to hold onto the pawn. Better was abandoning it.}
( 23…Kb7 24.Bxd6 Rbc8 {and black still has trouble, though not nearly as severe.})

24.Rac1 {!} {All of Fabiano’s remaining pieces entered the game in the most brutal fashion.}

Fabi-Hess9

Position after 24. Rac1

24… Rxb2 {Hess might as well take a pawn as there is no way to defend his pinned bishop.}
( 24…Rb4 25.b3 Kb7 26.Rd4 {!} Rd7 27.Bd2 {!} Rb6 28.Rcxc4 )
25.Rxc4+ Kb7

26.Rxd6 Re8

27.Rd7+ Ka6

28.Rcc7 Ree2 {Even with a 99.9% chance of defeat, Robert Hess still manages to create one more threat.}

29.Rxa7+ Kb6

30.Rdb7+ Kc6

31.Rxb2 Rxb2

Fabi-Hess10

Final Position

{Black resigns. Truly a superb chess game played by two incredible young prodigies!}
1-0

 

Chris Torres’ Chess Résumé

January 24, 2018

Chris Torres teaching chess (summer 2017)

 

Chris Torres

(209) 323-0197

chesslessons@aol.com · chessmusings.wordpress.com

Chris Torres is a nationally renowned scholastic chess coach working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His classes have attracted players of strengths ranging from rank beginners to world champions. A chess professional since 1998, Chris is widely recognized as one of the main driving forces behind the explosion in popularity and sudden rise in quality of scholastic chess in California.

Experience

1998 – 2000

Chess Coach, Weibel Elementary School

During his first year as a chess coach, Chris Torres helped Weibel to win the state championship and also coached his first state champion student.

2000 – 2005

Director of Instruction/Vice President, Success Chess Schools

At Success Chess, Chris Torres designed curriculum for all levels of chess players, trained over 50 instructors, established programs at 60 Bay Area schools. Chris established a strong coaching reputation by training several individual state champions each year.

2005 – Present

President, Torres Chess and Music Academy

Through the Torres Chess and Music Academy, Chris Torres has brought world class instruction to California’s most talented young chess minds. Some of his accomplishments included running a “Chess Study” with the Kern County Superintendent of the Schools and U.C. Berkeley from 2006-2008. In addition to the study, Chris was able to educate the children in Kern County’s migrant farm worker community in chess and even coach them to prestigious Southern California regional chess titles. In the Bay Area, Chris was able to instruct several individual National Chess Champions as well as coach for the Mission San Jose Elementary School chess team, which in 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018 took first place at the USCF National Elementary Chess Championship. Before 2009, no school from California had ever won the Elementary Championship section at the USCF Nationals.  In 2015 and 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy organized the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys which awarded over $100,000 in scholarships and prizes to the top youth chess players in the United States. In 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy accomplishments were officially recognized by FIDE (the world chess organization) and the TCAMA was awarded the title of FIDE Academy.

Chess Titles

2015

Correspondence Chess Master, United States Chess Federation

2015

Arena International Master, FIDE

Skills

·         Event Planning

·         Individualized Curriculum Development

·         Program Management

·         Tournament Game Analysis

·         Tournament Selection and Preparation

·         Using Chess as a Confidence Building Tool


%d bloggers like this: