Posts Tagged ‘Chris Torres’

Important Announcement Regarding the 2017 SPFNO 

April 2, 2017


Dear Chess Community,

As a chess coach, there are times when I have had to make the difficult choice to pass one of my favorite students to another instructor in order to better serve his/her best interests. It is never a decision that is taken lightly, not least because of the close bond a student and teacher create when working for years together. But as a coach, our first priority has to be the best interest and growth of the child even if that means stepping down as their coach. 

Recently, I used the same rationale in regards to the future of the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys. Over the past three years, I have worked closely with Susan to plot a good course for the SPFNO. Now facing many new distractions unrelated to this event, I do not think it would be in the best interests of the SPFNO for me to steer it to its next destination. For this reason, I am stepping down as chief organizer and handing the helm over to my good friend Judit Sztaray of Bay Area Chess. I look forward to seeing the mission of the SPFNO continue under Judit Sztaray’s direction.


Sincerely,

Chris Torres

More Fighting Chess from the 2016 Chess Olympiad

September 6, 2016

Today’s featured game from the 2016 Chess Olympiad includes an attack straight out of a chess hustler’s playbook which leads to a victory in just 27 moves. Hats off to Bader Al-Hajiri (Kuwait) and Rodwell Makoto (Zimbabwe) for playing such an entertaining game. Enjoy…

 

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.5”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Al-Hajiri, Bader”]
[Black “Makoto, Rodwell”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C48”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ FOUR KNIGHTS’ GAME,C48]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Nc3 Nf6

4.Bb5 Bc5

5.Nxe5

 

Position after 5. Nxe5

Position after 5. Nxe5

 

5… O-O {!?}

( 5…Nxe5 6.d4 {The Fork Trick} Bd6 7.f4 (7.dxe5 Bxe5 8.Be3 c6 9.Be2 O-O) 8.  Nc6 8.e5 {The Fork Trick: Part Two} O-O 9.exd6 Re8+
{And oddly enough, black is fine.} )

( 5…Bxf2+ {?!} 6.Kxf2 Nxe5 7.d4 Ng6 ( 7…Nfg4+ 8.Ke1 c6 9.dxe5 d6 10.Be2 Nxe5 11.Bf4
{and white is winning.} ) ( 7…Neg4+ 8.Kg1 c6 9.Be2 d5 10.exd5
O-O 11.dxc6 bxc6 12.h3 Nh6 13.g4 {I’d be happy to play as white from here.}) 8.e5 c6 9.exf6 {!} Qxf6+ 10.Qf3 Qxf3+ 11.gxf3 cxb5 12.Re1+
Kd8 13.Nxb5 {and white is better.} )

6.Nf3

( 6.O-O Nxe5 7.d4 Bd6 8.f4 Nc6 9.e5 Bb4 10.exf6 Qxf6 11.Nd5 Qxd4+ 12.Be3 Qxd1 13.Raxd1
Bd6 14.f5 f6 15.Bf4 Ne5 16.Bxe5 fxe5 17.f6 c6 18.Ne7+ Bxe7 19.fxe7
Re8 20.Bc4+ d5 21.Rxd5 cxd5 22.Bxd5+ Be6 23.Bxe6+ Kh8 24.Rf7
h5 25.Kf2 Kh7 {…1-0, Kulaots Kaido (EST) 2581 – Roiz Michael (ISR) 2652 , Plovdiv 3/22/2012 Ch Europe})

( 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.Nf3 Nxe4 8.Nxe4 Re8 9.d3 f5 10.O-O fxe4 11.dxe4
Bg4 12.Qe2 )

6… Nd4

7.Nxd4 ( 7.Be2 Nxe2 8.Qxe2 d5 9.d3 Bb4 10.e5
Re8 11.O-O Bg4 {Looks like a fun position for both colors.} )

7… Bxd4

8.Ne2 {?} {Bader Ali-Hajiri is asking for trouble with this move. Better was:}
( 8.O-O Re8 9.Be2 Bxc3 10.dxc3 Nxe4 )

 

Position after 8. Ne2

Position after 8. Ne2

 

8… Bxf2+ {!} {Rodwell Makoto responds with fire.}

9.Kxf2 Nxe4+

10.Ke1 Qf6 {Attacks like these are usually reserved for the street chess hustlers. I’m taking notes.}

11.Rf1 Qh4+

12.Ng3 Re8 {Threatening a discovered check with Nc3 which wins the queen.}

 

Position after 12... Re8

Position after 12… Re8

 

13.Be2 Nxg3 {Not sure I agree with voluntarily trading pieces here. Black is attacking and
therefor should be looking to bring in more force not remove it.}

14.hxg3 Qxg3+

15.Rf2 {Bader Al-Hajiri has done a fine job weathering Rodwell Makoto’s creative attack.}

15… d5

16.Kf1 {?} {Unpinning the rook and bishop by stepping aside is tempting but now when
black’s queen moves to h2 white will be in serious trouble. Much better was:}
( 16.d4 Qh2 17.Bf4 Qg1+ 18.Rf1 Qxg2 19.Rf2 Qg1+ 20.Rf1 Qg2 {draw by repetition.})

 

Position after 16. Kf1

Position after 16. Kf1

 

16… Qh2 {!}

17.Rf3 Bg4 ( 17…d4 18.d3 Bg4 19.c3
Re6 20.Bf4 Qh1+ 21.Kf2 Rxe2+ 22.Qxe2 Qxa1 {is another way to go about the attack.})

18.a4 {?} {Trying to make up for his earlier mistakes, Beder Al-Hajiri will try to get
both of his rooks unified in the third rank. This is a very unusual plan and unfortunately, for Al-Hajiri, not very effective.}

( 18.Re3 {Exchanging the queens and freeing the pieces was a much better plan for white.}
Qh1+ 19.Kf2 Qxd1 20.Bxd1 Bxd1 21.d4 c6 22.c3 f6 23.Bd2 )

18… Re6

19.Raa3 {Bader Al-Hajiri has accomplished his goal behind playing 18. a4.}

 

Position after 19. Raa3

Position after 19. Raa3

 

19… d4 {!} {With one pawn push, Rodwell Makoto takes away his opponent’s chances of placing
a rook into the open e-file. This is a crushing blow to white.}

20.Rh3 {Bader Al-Hajiri tries to resurrect some purpose for his rooks being in the third rank.}

20… Rf6+

21.Rhf3 ( 21.Raf3 Bxh3 22.gxh3 Rg6 23.Ke1 Re8 {is even worse for black.})

21… Re8 {Rodwell Makoto has four pieces left and they are all involved in the attack on Bader Al-Hajiri’s king.}

22.Kf2 Qh4+

23.Kg1 Rfe6

24.g3 Qh5

25.Bf1 {?} {Its impossible to defend against such force with such a disorganized position. However, Rfe3 was the more accurate choice.} ( 25.Rfe3 Bxe2 26.Qxe2 Qxe2 27.Rxe2 Rxe2 28.Rf3 )

 

Position after 25. Bf1

Position after 25. Bf1

 

25… Re1{!} {Just crushing.}

26.Rae3 R8xe3

27.Rxe3 Rxe3 {and Bader Al-Hajiri resigns as his queen is trapped.}
0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Hidden Gems Abound at the 2016 Chess Olympiads

September 4, 2016

One of my favorite hobbies is treasure hunting for beautifully instructive chess games during the annual Chess Olympiads. With more than 180 countries each sending their best male and female teams to compete in one event, the Chess Olympiads is a veritable mother load of chess gems. For hunting these chess treasures, I follow along at:

The official site for the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads

http://www1.bakuchessolympiad.com//

 

 

Chess Daily News

https://chessdailynews.com

 

ChessGames.com

http://www.chessgames.com/index.html

 

FM Qiu Zhou of Canada

FM Qiyu Zhou of Canada

And to illustrate just the kind of hidden gems I am talking about, I present Sindira Joshi (Nepal) vs. Qiyu Zhou (Canada) from round 1 of the 2016 FIDE Chess Olympiads. Enjoy…

[Event “Chess Olympiad”]
[Site “Baku, Azerbaijan”]
[Date “2016.9.2”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Joshi, Sindira”]
[Black “Zhou, Qiyu”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “C54”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

{[ ITALIAN GAME & HUNGARIAN def.,C54]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {The start to the Scotch.}

3… exd4

4.Bc4 Bc5

5.c3 {Transposing to a Giuoco Piano.}

5… Nf6

6.cxd4 Bb4+

7.Bd2 {White could have also chosen the equally popular Moeller Attack by playing Nc3 and gambitting the e-pawn.}

( 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 O-O 11.Rxe4 Ne7 12.d6
cxd6 13.Qxd6 Nf5 14.Qd5 d6 15.Bg5 Bxg5 16.Nxg5 Qxg5 17.Qxf7+
{1-0, Euwe Max (NED) – Van Mindeno A, Netherlands 1927 It “AVRO”} )

 

Position after 7. Bd2

Position after 7. Bd2

 

7… Nxe4

8.Bxb4 Nxb4

9.Bxf7+ Kxf7

10.Qb3+ d5 {Discovered by Gioachino Greco, this line is a mere 400 years old.}

 

Position after 10... d5

Position after 10… d5

 

11.Qxb4 {Greco preffered Ne5+ here.}

11… Rf8

12.Nc3 {So far so good for the much lower rated Sindira Joshi. Her chances are about equal here.}
( 12.O-O Ng5 13.Ne5+ Kg8 14.Nc3 c6 15.f4 Nf7 16.Ne2 Nd6 17.Ng3
a5 18.Qa3 a4 19.Qb4 a3 20.bxa3 Nb5 21.a4 Qd6 22.Rab1 Qxb4 23.Rxb4
Nc3 24.Rb3 Nxa4 25.Ne2 Ra6 26.g3 Nb6 27.Nc3 Na4 28.Ne2 Nb6 29.Nc3
Nc4 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Rb4 b5 {…1/2-1/2, Schaefer Markus (GER) 2390 – Postny Evgeny (ISR) 2595 , Plovdiv 10/19/2010 Cup European Club})

12… Nxc3 13.bxc3 {?} {A slight innacuracy. Better was Qxc3 as seen in this game:}

( 13.Qxc3 Kg8 14.O-O Qd6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Rae1 Rae8 17.Re3 Re6 18.Rfe1
Ref6 19.b4 {1/2-1/2, Danilenko Dmitriy (UKR) 1992 – Pavlov Maxim (UKR) 2327 , Alushta 5/18/2006 Ch Ukraine (1/2 final)})

13… Kg8

14.Ne5 {?} {Another harmless looking mistake. Much better was h4 to prevent Qg5.}

 

Position after 14. Ne5

Position after 14. Ne5

 

14… Qg5 {Here comes trouble.}

15.g3 {?} {As dangerous as it looks, castling is to be preferred here.}

15… Rxf2 {!} {Qiyu Zhou starts her combination with a beautiful rook sacrifice.}

 

Position after 15.... Rxf2

Position after 15…. Rxf2

 

16.Kxf2 Qd2+

17.Kf3 Bh3 {Qiyu Zhou is putting on a tactical clinic.}

 

Position after 15... Bh3

Position after 15… Bh3

 

18.Rad1 {Sindira Joshi seems to be playing the most accurate responses but Qiyu Zhou continues to press her advantage.}

18… Bg2+

19.Kg4 Qe2+

20.Kh4 Bxh1 {Not just to win the exchange but also to set up a vicious fork.}

 

Position after 20... Bxh1

Position after 20… Bxh1

 

21.Rxh1 Qe4+ {and now Sindira Joshi’s only chance is to hope for a rare blunder from Qiyu Zhou.}

22.Kh3 Qxh1 {Qiyu Zhou concludes the prefectly executed 8 move combination.}

23.Qe7 {Sindira Joshi finally has a choice but it is to pick her own poison.}

( 23.Qxb7 Rf8 24.Qxc7 Qf1+ 25.Kh4 Qf6+ 26.Kh3 Qf5+ 27.g4 Qf1+
28.Kg3 Qf4+ 29.Kg2 g5 {seems very unpleasant for white.} ) {%09DB}

23… Qf1+ {Qiyu Zhou grabs the initiative again.}

 

Position after 23... Qf1+

Position after 23… Qf1+

 

24.Kh4 Qf6+ {Qiyu Zhou wisely choses to force an exchange of queens and head into a rook vs. knight endgame.}

25.Qxf6 gxf6

26.Nd7 Kf7

27.Nc5 b6

28.Nd3 Re8

29.Nf4 {Hats off to Sindira Joshi for continueing to play on and give us a chance to study good endgame technique.}

 

Position after 29. Nf4

Position after 29. Nf4

 

29… c6

30.Kg4 Re3

31.Kf5 {Nothing can be done to save white’s queenside pawns from a Qiyu Zhou’s rampaging rook.}

31… Rxc3

32.Nh5 Rc2

33.h4 Rxa2

34.Kf4 a5

35.Ke3 b5

36.Nf4 a4

37.Nd3 a3

38.Nb4 Rb2 {Sindira Joshi resigns as there is no hope left for white.} 0-1

 

Final Position

Final Position

Fremont Summer Chess Camp 2016

May 9, 2016

Come train with the 2015 and 2016 National Elementary Chess Champions at MSJE!

IMG_3217

This camp will feature chess instruction by:

  • GM Susan Polgar (Former World Champion and Current Head Coach for the National Collegiate Chess Champions at Webster University)
  • NM Eric Schiller (The world’s most prolific chess author)
  • Jay Stallings (Acclaimed author, chess coach and developer of Coach Jay’s Chess Academy)
  • Chris Torres (President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy)
  • Joe Lonsdale (Head Coach of the National Champions at Mission San Jose Elementary School)
  • James Paquette (Director of Instruction for the Torres Chess and Music Academy)
Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

Don’t miss out on the best chess opportunity of the summer! Our coaches will use their decades of chess teaching experience to create a summer camp that is fun, competitive and educational.  Attendees will receive the best training available and take part in USCF rated tournaments with awards given at the end of each week.  All students who complete four weeks of camp will receive a commemorative camp T-shirt, a special 1 on 1 follow up lesson by TCAMA instructors, and hand signed diploma awarded to be awarded by Susan Polgar!

 

Camp will meet from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM,

Mondays through Thursdays,

July 5 to July 28

At Mission San Jose Elementary School (43545 Bryant St. Fremont, CA 94539.)

1374182_10151787887318611_113356610_n

To apply online, or for more information on the TCAMA, please visit CHESSANDMUSIC.COM, or contact Chris Torres at chesslessons@aol.com.

The checks should be made payable to The TCAMA Inc. The fees for the chess program are nonrefundable after the class has begun. No refunds will be given for unscheduled student absences.

Please make the checks out to TCAMA Inc. and Mail them to:

The Torres Chess and Music Academy, 16691 Colonial Trail, Lathrop, CA 95330

Name of child: ___________________________________________

Parents (Guardian) name(s): ________________________________

Date of birth: ___/___/_____ Grade: ____ School: _________________

Address: _______________________________________________

City: ___________________________ California Zip: __________

Telephone: (___)_________ E-mail: __________________________

I AM PAYING My Child Will Go
  $222.00 FOR ONE WEEK   7/5-7/7
  $414.00 FOR TWO WEEKS   7/11-7/14
  $606.00 FOR THREE WEEKS   7/18-7/21
  $750.00 FOR FOUR WEEKS   7/25-7/28

There will be a $50 refund the week of 7/5 because there is only 3 days due to the 4th of July holiday

Susan Polgar, GM

Guest Lecturer 7/25-7/28

To summarize Susan Polgar‘s chess accomplishments is nearly an impossible task. Susan was the winner of four Women’s World Chess Championships, is a five time Olympic champion with over 10 medals earned, became the number one ranked woman in the world at the age of fifteen, became the first chess player ever to be a World Champion at Blitz, Rapid and Classical time controls. In addition, Susan Polgar was the first woman to be awarded a men’s Grandmaster title in chess, win the U.S. Open Blitz Championship, be awarded the Grandmaster of the year honor, serve as the head coach of a men’s division 1 NCAA team that won a National Collegiate Championship, serve as the head coach of a number one ranked men’s division one collegiate team, serve as the Head Coach of Men’s Division 1 Teams from two different schools to win the Final Four National Collegiate Championship, serve as Head Coach of a Men’s Division I Team to win the National Collegiate Championship 3 straight years and be named coach of the year for a men’s collegiate team. Further accomplishments of Susan Polgar are too numerous to list but even this small sample of work as both a world champion of chess and a world class chess teacher easily rank her as the best chess teacher in the United States.

 

Eric Schiller Ph.D.

Guest Lecturer

The Torres Chess and Music Academy is pleased to have Eric Schiller as a coach for the 2014 Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School. Eric Schiller Ph.D. is the author of over 100 chess books and the personal chess coach to many talented young players. When he is not playing in major chess tournaments, Eric is a sought after International Arbiter who has organized and directed an impressive list of chess tournaments and matches. Eric Schiller has stated that he looks forward to making the “best chess camp even better in 2014.”

Jay Stallings

Guest Lecturer/Coach Jay’s Chess Academy

Coach Jay Stallings is ranked as an Expert with the United States Chess Federation. He founded the California Youth Chess League in 1996. With programs including after school and evening classes, tournaments, camps, free chess play, and special events year round, the CYCL makes chess incredibly accessible in the Santa Clarita Valley. Through the years, under Coach Jay’s leadership, CYCL has taught chess to over 20,000 young players in and around Santa Clarita.

 

Chris Torres

President

Chris Torres is a nationally renowned scholastic chess coach working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His classes have attracted players of strengths ranging from rank beginners to world champions. Working as a professional chess instructor since 1998, Chris is widely recognized as one of the main driving forces behind the explosion in popularity and sudden rise in quality of scholastic chess in California. Currently, Chris Torres has the ranking of candidate master and serves as the President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy. Mr. Torres’ hobbies include playing classical guitar and getting his students to appear on the national top 100 chess rating lists.

 

Joe Lonsdale

Head Coach MSJE

If ever there was an official Hall of Fame for California chess coaches, Joe Lonsdale would be a first ballot inductee. Joe Lonsdale started the MSJE (Mission San Jose Elementary School, Fremont) chess team in 1990 when his oldest son was a third grader at MSJE. It didn’t take long for Joe’s chess team to rise to the top.  In 1992 Coach Joe led MSJE to win its first grade level National Championship. They won the overall National Elementary School Championship in  2009, in 2013, 2015 and 2016. At the 2012 Elementary School Nationals MSJE was the only team in the country to finish in the top four in every Elementary school championship section (K-1, K-3, K-5, & K-6). Joe Lonsdale’s goal in chess is to make MSJE the strongest scholastic chess program in the nation and the recent evidence of their success would suggest that he is succeeding.

James Paquette

Director of Instruction

James Paquette has everything we look for in a great chess teacher and more. A former chess student of Chris Torres, James now teaches chess professionally while attending a prestigious local university to study law. James Paquette has several years of experience managing small children which he gained while achieving his black belt in Taekwondo. While an undergrad honor roll student, James was a star football player at the college level and uses his experience from the field to teach children the level of commitment necessary to become a champion.  James Paquette relates to children of all backgrounds extremely well and is now one of the most popular coaches at the Torres Chess and Music Academy.

Puzzle Worthy Position 19

May 5, 2016

Black is just one move away from mate. What should white play?

White to move and win.

Puzzle Worthy Position 18

May 4, 2016

Easy puzzle tonight from a fun victory. What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move?

Complete game:
[Event “SocialChess”]

[Site “Internet”]

[Date “2016.05.03”]

[Round “-“]

[White “Chris Torres”]

[Black “okun’ok (1574)”]

[Result “1-0”]
 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Nc3 O-O 5. d3 Nc6 6. Bg5 h6 7. h4 hxg5 8. hxg5 Nh7 9. Nd5 Nxg5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Qh5 f6 12. Nxf6# 1-0

Reader Submitted Question on Spielmann – Capablanca (1928)

May 1, 2016
Rudolf Spielmann

Rudolf Spielmann

Chris,

(Child’s name) and I were playing this game and couldn’t figure out why Spielmann won the game (Jose Raul Capablanca vs Rudolf Spielmann 1928) , since it’s not forced mate.

Thank you.

Best regards,
(Parent)

 

 

Answer:

 

Good question! Capablanca is one of my heroes but Spielmann is possibly the most overlooked chess genius in history. Unfortunate for Mr. Spielmann, he reached his peak in a very difficult time (the 1930’s) for chess players. In this period, sponsors for major events were hard to find and Europe was racing down the road toward WWII. Even still, Spielmann obtained a lifetime even record against the great Capablanca which modern chess players constantly marvel in envy at.

Now for the specifics of your question… The final position of Capablanca – Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928 looked like this:

 

Final position of Capablanca - Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928

Final position of Capablanca – Spielmann, Bad Kissingen 1928

 

The first thing we notice is that Rudolf Spielmann is threatening a mate in one with Qxg2#. To avoid mate, Capablanca could play (a)Qf3 or (b)pawn to f3. If Q f3:

After 40. Qf3.

After (a)40. Qf3.

Black responds with Qe1+ and Capablanca will aslo lose his queen.

White is in check and will lose his queen.

White is in check and will lose his queen.

 

So now for option (b):

Position after 40. f3.

Position after (b)40. f3.

This is a much better alternative to choice (a) but Capablanca would still lose. Immediately, I spot a nice fork that will win an additional pawn for black.

Position after 40... Qb1+.

Position after 40… Qb1+.

After 41. Kh2 Qxb5 42. Kg3 Qc4 black is ahead by a solid three points of material in an endgame and will eventually be able to convert his material advantage into a win.

Position after 42... Qc4.

Position after 42… Qc4.

Here, Capablanca would avoid trading queens and play something like:

43. Qd2 Qc5 44. Kh2 Be6 45. Kg3 g5 46. Kh2 Kg7 47. Qb2+ Kg6 48. Qd2 Qd5 49. Qc3 Qc4 50. Qe1
Qd4 51. Qb1+ Kg7 52. Kg3 Qe5+ 53. Kf2 Qc5+ 54. Kg3 Qxa5 and black should be able to use his extra force to win the endgame.

Position after 54... Qxa5.

Position after 54… Qxa5.

Capablanca respected Spielmann enough not to waste any extra energy on a forgone conclusion. Even still, I would be very disappointed if one of my students resigned as white where Capablanca did. Queen endgames are notoriously difficult to play properly and resigning in positions like these result in far fewer miraculous comebacks and more importantly the resigning player misses out entirely on important learning opportunities.

 

For those interested in learning more about this incredible chess battle, the entire game is pasted below. Enjoy…

[Event “Bad Kissingen”]
[Site “Bad Kissingen GER”]
[Date “1928.08.17”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[Black “Rudolf Spielmann”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[Result “0-1”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.e3 b5 6.a4 b4 7.Na2 e6 8.Bxc4 Be7 9.O-O
O-O 10.b3 c5 11.Bb2 Bb7 12.Nc1 Nc6 13.dxc5 Na5 14.Ne5 Nxc4 15.Nxc4 Bxc5 16.Nd3
Qd5 17.Nf4 Qg5 18.Bxf6 Qxf6 19.Rc1 Rfd8 20.Qh5 Rac8 21.Rfd1 g6 22.Rxd8+ Qxd8
23.Qe5 Be7 24.h3 Rc5 25.Qa1 Bf6 26.Rd1 Rd5 27.Rxd5 exd5 28.Ne5 Qd6 29.Nfd3 Ba6
30.Qe1 Bxe5 31.Nxe5 Qxe5 32.Qxb4 Bd3 33.Qc5 Qb8 34.b4 Qb7 35.b5 h5 36.Qc3 Bc4
37.e4 Qe7 38.exd5 Bxd5 39.a5 Qe4 0-1

 

If you have a question about chess, feel free to email me at chesslessons@aol.com

Kasparov’s Scotch too Strong for So

April 28, 2016
Garry Kasparov (photo: www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov (photo: http://www.kasparov.com)

Garry Kasparov triumphantly returned to top level chess by crushing Wesley So in round one of the Ultimate Blitz Challenge today in Saint Louis. In vintage form, Kasparov played his beloved Scotch in a remarkable victory against the new generation of elite chess players.

[Event “Ultimate Blitz Challenge”]
[Site “Saint Louis (USA)”]
[Date “2016.4.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Kasparov, Garry”]
[Black “So, Wesley”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C45”]
[Annotator “Torres, Chris”]

{[ SCOTCH GAME,C45]}

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.d4 {Garry Kasparov wastes no time in testing his beloved Scotch against the new generation of elite chess players.}

Position after 3. d4.

Position after 3. d4.

3… exd4

4.Nxd4 Nf6

5.Nxc6 bxc6

6.e5 Qe7

7.Qe2 Nd5

8.c4 Ba6

9.b3 g6

( 9…O-O-O 10.g3 g5 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.Nd2 Nb4 13.Nf3 Rhe8 14.a3
g4 15.Nh4 Bxe5 16.O-O-O Na2+ 17.Kc2 Qf6 18.Bxe5 Rxe5 19.Qd2 Rde8
20.Bd3 d5 21.Rhe1 d4 22.Rxe5 Rxe5 23.f3 Nc3 24.Rf1 Qd6 25.Kb2
c5 26.fxg4 Bb7 27.Rxf7 Be4 28.Nf5 Qb6 29.Re7 {…1/2-1/2, Rublevsky Sergei (RUS) 2683 – Karjakin Sergey (RUS) 2747 , Poikovsky 6/12/2010 It (cat.18)})

Position after 9... g6.

Position after 9… g6.

 

10.Ba3

( 10.f4 Qb4+ 11.Bd2 Qb6 12.Qe4 f5 13.Qf3
Qd4 14.Nc3 Nxc3 15.Bxc3 Bb4 16.Rc1 Bxc3+ 17.Rxc3 O-O-O 18.c5
Bb7 19.Qe3 Qxe3+ 20.Rxe3 d6 21.Bc4 Kd7 22.h4 d5 23.Bd3 h5 24.Rg3
Rh6 25.b4 Ke6 26.Kd2 Ra8 27.Rb1 a6 28.Rb3 Kf7 29.Ra3 Rhh8 {…1-0, Kasparov Garry (RUS) 2849 – Bacrot Etienne (FRA) 2613 , Sarajevo 2000 It (cat.19)})

10… c5

( 10…Qg5 11.Bxf8 Kxf8 12.Nd2 Re8 13.Nf3 Qf5 14.g3 Nb4
15.O-O-O Nxa2+ 16.Kb2 Nb4 17.h4 d6 18.Bh3 Qf6 19.exf6 Rxe2+ 20.Kc3
Na2+ 21.Kd3 Rxf2 22.Rhf1 Nb4+ 23.Ke3 Rb2 24.Nd2 c5 25.Kf2 Bb7
26.Kg1 Nc2 27.Rf2 Nd4 28.Re1 h6 29.Bg2 Bxg2 30.Kxg2 {…0-1, Khader Sami (JOR) 2413 – Amin Bassem (EGY) 2505 , Abudhabi 8/15/2006 It (open)})

( 10…Qxa3 11.Nxa3 Bb4+ 12.Qd2 Bxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Ne7 14.Re1 Rf8
15.c5 Bxf1 16.Rhxf1 Rb8 17.Re4 Nd5 18.Ra4 Rb7 19.Re1 Ke7 20.Ree4
f6 21.exf6+ Kxf6 22.Nc4 Rd8 23.Ne5 Rb5 24.Ng4+ Kf7 25.Rxa7 Rxc5
26.a4 Nc3 27.Rf4+ Ke6 28.Ne3 Nb1+ 29.Ke2 Nc3+ 30.Kd3 {…1/2-1/2, Savchenko Boris (RUS) 2627 – Nabaty Tamir (ISR) 2526 , Bansko 12/16/2010 It (open)})

11.g3

( 11.Bb2 Bg7 12.f4 O-O 13.g3 Nb6 14.Bg2 Rad8 15.Nc3 Rfe8
16.Rb1 d5 17.Bf3 f6 18.Nb5 c6 19.Nd6 Rxd6 20.exd6 Qd7 21.Be5
fxe5 22.Bg4 Qxd6 23.O-O e4 24.Rfd1 d4 25.Bf3 d3 26.Qe1 Qe6 27.Bg2
Bd4+ 28.Kh1 Qe7 29.a4 Bc8 30.a5 Nd7 {…0-1, Murariu Andrei (ROM) 2503 – Smeets Jan (NED) 2619 , Verdun 1995 Ch Europe (juniors) (under 10)})

11… Bg7 ( 11…Nb6 12.Bg2 Rd8 13.Nd2 Bg7 14.Bb2 O-O 15.O-O Rfe8
16.Rfe1 d6 17.Bc6 Nd7 18.Nf3 dxe5 19.Rad1 f6 20.Ba3 Bf8 21.Qe3
Qe6 22.Bd5 {1-0, Knotkova Martina (CZE) – Koubkova Alena (CZE) 2038, Chrudim (Czech Republic) 1993})

12.f4

Position after 12. f4.

Position after 12. f4.

 

12… Nb4

13.Bg2 Rd8

14.Nc3 O-O

15.Bb2 d5

16.a3 d4

17.axb4 dxc3

18.Bxc3 cxb4

19.Bb2 Bc8

20.O-O

Position after 20. 0-0.

Position after 20. 0-0.

20… f6 {?} {This is just not a good move. It would have been much better for Wesley So to
simply redeploy his bishop to f5 then expose his king to Bd5+.}

21.Bd5+ {!} {Garry Kasparov takes advantage of his opponent’s self-inflicted weakness.}

21… Rxd5 {?} {Did Wesley So panic and miss his best chance for avoiding a loss? Perhaps Kasparov’s Scotch is too strong for So.}
( 21…Kh8 22.exf6 ( 22.Rxa7 fxe5 23.Bxe5 Bg4 24.Qb2
( 24.Qxg4 {?} Qc5+ 25.Kh1 Qxa7 ) ) Qc5+ 23.Qf2 Qxf2+ 24.Rxf2
Bxf6 )

Position after 21... Rxd5.

Position after 21… Rxd5.

22.cxd5

22… Qc5+

23.Rf2 fxe5

24.Bxe5 Bxe5

25.Qxe5 Rd8

26.Rd1 Bg4

27.Qd4 Qa5

28.Rdd2 Re8

29.Kg2 Qb5

30.h3 {Unsurprisingly, Garry Kasparov’s technique is still first-rate.}

Position after 30. h3.

Position after 30. h3.

 

30… Bf5

31.g4 Be4+

32.Kh2 c5

33.Qf6 ( 33.dxc6 Bxc6 34.Qxa7 {Is fine but Kasparov’s plan seems to win in a simpler fashion.})

33… c4

34.d6 ( 34.bxc4 Qd7 35.Qd4 b3 36.Rde2 {Is an alternative path to victory.})

34… Bc6

35.f5 {!} {Kasparov pushes So against the ropes!}

35… Rf8 {Kasparov has mate in 12.}

36.Qe6+ ( 36.Qe6+ Kg7 37.fxg6 Bf3 38.Qe7+ Kxg6 39.d7 Qb8+ 40.Rd6+
Qxd6+ 41.Qxd6+ Rf6 42.d8=Q Rxd6 43.Qxd6+ Kg7 44.Rxf3 h5 45.gxh5
a6 46.Qf8+ Kh7 47.Rf7#)

36… Kg7

37.d7 {Not the most accurate but perhaps the easiest continuation in a blitz game.}

37… Qc5

38.Qd6 ( 38…Qxd6+ 39.Rxd6 {and So has to choose between saving his bishop or allowing Kasparov to regain a queen.}) 1-0

Final Position.

Final Position.

 

 

Puzzle Worthy Position 17

April 28, 2016

Easy one tonight! White to move and win.

White to move and win.

Puzzle Worthy Position 16

April 27, 2016

Black can blow-up white’s position with the correct combination.

Black to move and win.


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