#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 72

September 14, 2017

White to move and mate in 5.

White to move and mate in 5. (Ernesto Inarkiev – Mikhael Mchedlishvili, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

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#Chess Lesson Worth Sharing: Carlsen vs. Xiangzhi 2017 FIDE World Cup

September 14, 2017

One of my favorite jazz artists, Charles Mingus once said, “Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity.” In chess, it is quite common for the more confident player to add complications to the position in order to allow him/her more opportunities to prove superior skill. In general, this is a good strategy and oftentimes the resulting victories are praised by chess aficionados. Of course, another result is also quite possible.

In the 2017 FIDE World Cup match between Bu Xiangzhi and World Champion Magnus Carlsen, Magnus’ over complicated style with the white pieces was dealt a devastating blow by Bu’s straight forward approach as black. Magnus chose a slow developing line of the Giuoco Piano which included several slow pawn moves and piece redeployments. Bu Xiangzhi on the other hand played a fairly straight forward opening with only one cryptic move (9… Rab8.) The result of the game clearly demonstrated the dangers of being too fancy as Magnus’ 11. h3 was severely punished by a common bishop sacrifice and a very creative early advancement of the h-pawn.

As a fan of Magnus Carlsen this game was painful to watch. As a chess educator, this game is a golden opportunity to demonstrate important lessons. For this reason I am sharing my lesson plans on this game. Try pairing the moves with Charles Mingus’ “Music Written for Monterey.”

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 1

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 2

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 3

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 4

 

Carlsen – Xiangzhi page 5

 

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 71

September 13, 2017

How should white continue in order to promote his pawn?

How should white continue in order to promote his pawn? (Richard Rapport – Li Chao, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 70

September 12, 2017

What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move? (Wesley So – Matthias Bluebaum, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 69

September 12, 2017

What is black’s best move?

What is black’s best move? (Magnus Carlsen – Bu Xiangzhi, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 68

September 9, 2017

What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move? (Magnus Carlsen – Alexey Dreev, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 67

September 7, 2017

Black to move and mate in 4.

Black to move and mate in 4.

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 66

September 7, 2017

What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move? (Francisco Vallejo Pons – Murali Karthikeyan, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 65

September 7, 2017

What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move? (Anton Demchenko – Alexander Areshchenko, 2017 FIDE World Cup)

#Chess Puzzle Worth Sharing 64

September 5, 2017

What is white’s best move?

What is white’s best move? (Hou Yifan – Kacper Piorun, FIDE World Cup 2017)


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