Posts Tagged ‘FIDE’

Chris Torres’ Chess Résumé

January 24, 2018

Chris Torres teaching chess (summer 2017)

 

Chris Torres

(209) 323-0197

chesslessons@aol.com · chessmusings.wordpress.com

Chris Torres is a nationally renowned scholastic chess coach working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His classes have attracted players of strengths ranging from rank beginners to world champions. A chess professional since 1998, Chris is widely recognized as one of the main driving forces behind the explosion in popularity and sudden rise in quality of scholastic chess in California.

Experience

1998 – 2000

Chess Coach, Weibel Elementary School

During his first year as a chess coach, Chris Torres helped Weibel to win the state championship and also coached his first state champion student.

2000 – 2005

Director of Instruction/Vice President, Success Chess Schools

At Success Chess, Chris Torres designed curriculum for all levels of chess players, trained over 50 instructors, established programs at 60 Bay Area schools. Chris established a strong coaching reputation by training several individual state champions each year.

2005 – Present

President, Torres Chess and Music Academy

Through the Torres Chess and Music Academy, Chris Torres has brought world class instruction to California’s most talented young chess minds. Some of his accomplishments included running a “Chess Study” with the Kern County Superintendent of the Schools and U.C. Berkeley from 2006-2008. In addition to the study, Chris was able to educate the children in Kern County’s migrant farm worker community in chess and even coach them to prestigious Southern California regional chess titles. In the Bay Area, Chris was able to instruct several individual National Chess Champions as well as coach for the Mission San Jose Elementary School chess team, which in 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018 took first place at the USCF National Elementary Chess Championship. Before 2009, no school from California had ever won the Elementary Championship section at the USCF Nationals.  In 2015 and 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy organized the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Girls and Boys which awarded over $100,000 in scholarships and prizes to the top youth chess players in the United States. In 2016, the Torres Chess and Music Academy accomplishments were officially recognized by FIDE (the world chess organization) and the TCAMA was awarded the title of FIDE Academy.

Chess Titles

2015

Correspondence Chess Master, United States Chess Federation

2015

Arena International Master, FIDE

Skills

·         Event Planning

·         Individualized Curriculum Development

·         Program Management

·         Tournament Game Analysis

·         Tournament Selection and Preparation

·         Using Chess as a Confidence Building Tool

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More Commendations 

January 4, 2016

  

Dear Mr. Torres,
On behalf of the FIDE President Mr. Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, please, find attached the certificate for the title of Arena International Master.

Best Regards,
Michalis Kaloumenos 

Chariman of FIDE Online Commission

Huge Chess News for California

May 8, 2014

SPFLOGO12x1272dpi

It’s official. Talented chess players from around the United States will be coming to California next February in order to compete in the 10th annual Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Boys and Girls. Over $100,000 will be  awarded in prizes, which include trophies, computers, chess prizes and scholarships to Webster University.  In addition to these great prizes, winners of age appropriate sections will automatically qualify to play on Team USA at the 2015 FIDE World Youth Chess Championships in Porta Carras, Greece. To my knowledge, this is the first time in history that California has hosted a tournament which is an official qualifying event for the World Youth. Thanks to a partnership with the Torres Chess and Music Academy, this is also the first time that the Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Boys and Girls will be played on the West Coast.

Event Title:  Susan Polgar Foundation’s National Open for Boys and Girls

Event Date: February 28 through March 1, 2015

Location: Santa Clara Convention Center (Santa Clara, California)

Prizes: $100,000 will be  awarded in prizes, which include trophies, computers, chess prizes, scholarships to Webster University and opportunities to qualify for the FIDE World Youth Chess Championships.

Tournament Format: 6 Round Swiss G/45 d/5. 9 Sections

Registration/Info: www.ChessAndMusic.com

 

 

World Chess Championship 2012: Anand-Gelfand

May 9, 2012

In a few days, Boris Gelfand of Israel will  attempt to strip the crown off of reigning world chess champion Viswanathan Anand in a highly publicized match to determine the new king of chess. The Israeli challenger’s task of defeating Anand will be the most difficult of his long career and likely the last chance the ageing grand master will have to become a world chess champion. In addition to the title, Boris Gelfand will also be fighting for the lion’s share of the 2.55 million dollar prize fund and for the honor of being Israel’s first world champion chess player.
   Viswanathan Anand has, for decades, proven to be one of the most dominant chess players of our modern era. He has won numerous prestigious tournaments including Wijk aan Zee (1988, 1998, 2003, 2004, 2005 joint with Veselin Topalov), Reggio Emilia (1992), Alekhine Memorial (Moscow, 1992), the PCA Interzonal (Groningen, 1993), Biel (1997) and Linares (1998, 2007, 2008). Anand also holds the distinction of being the only world chess champion to have won his titles in many formats including Tournament, Match, Rapid, and Knockout chess. Currently ranked number four in the world, Anand is considered the heavy favorite to defend his title successfully in 2012.
   Boris Gelfand’s career may not be as grand as Anand’s but it still contains many highlights that would make any elite chess player proud. Boris Gelfand’s tournament victories include Wijk aan Zee (1992), Biel (1993), Dos Hermanas (1994), Belgrade (1995), Tilburg (1996), Malmö (1999), and Pamplona (2004). In 2007 Gelfand surprised chess enthusiasts by finishing joint second with reigning world champion Vladimir Kramnik at the FIDE World Championship tournament that Anand won. Currently, Boris Gelfand is ranked number twenty in the world by FIDE.
   The 2012 World Chess Championship begins on May 10, 2012 at the  Engineering Building of the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. I will attempt to provide meaningful coverage of the entire competition for anyone who should stumble upon my blog and wish to remain current on the Anand-Gelfand match.

Schedule

10 May Opening ceremony

11 May Game 1

12 May Game 2

13 May Rest day

image

14 May Game 3

15 May Game 4

16 May Rest day

17 May Game 5

18 May Game 6

19 May Rest day

20 May Game 7

21 May Game 8

22 May Rest day

23 May Game 9

24 May Game 10

25 May Rest day

26 May Game 11

27 May Rest day

28 May Game 12

29 May Rest day

30 May Tie break

The official event website

  

National K-12 Chess Championship 2011

November 18, 2011

Dallas, Texas is being bombarded by young chess players with dreams of national championships. Texans should not be alarmed by children armed with weighted chess pieces because November 18 – 20 is the 2011 United States Chess Federation’s National K-12 Chess Championships.
   The USCF National K-12 Chess Championship is the premier grade-level chess tournament in the United States. Chess players in grade 12 or below compete for three days in thirteen sections to determine the best school-aged chess players in America. Chess players in identical grades from the same school will also be competing for team standings.
   This year I have fewer students participating do to the fact that the World Youth Chess Championship in Brazil starts on the same day. Its unfortunate that the USCF and Fide would schedule championship tournaments that conflict with eachother. Even with the double scheduling, California will have several strong players representing the state.
   Two of my favorite six-year-olds will be in attendance. Milind Maiti of Cupertino went undefeated at the 2011 National Elementary Chess Championship and also finished first at the 2011 National Junior Chess Congress. Rishith Susarla of Fremont has worked as hard as any of my chess students for the last sixth months. Underrated at 1454, Rishith seems poised to win his first National Championship. Milind and Rishith are good friends and will likely rise to chess stardom aided by eachother’s successes.

World Youth Chess Championship 2011

November 17, 2011

This November the world’s most talented players who are eighteen years and younger will converge upon Caldas Novas, Brazil in order to compete in the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship. These extraordinary chess talents will do battle for nine rounds in hopes of placing in the top three for their age group. Those fortunate enough to accomplish this task will be rewarded with bronze, silver and gold medals in an olympic style ceremony. Round one of the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship will begin on Friday the eighteenth of November. The official website for this event is http://www.wycc2011.com/. Those interested in the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship should also keep visiting this blog for regular updates on California’s participants as well as the insider details from my student Ben Rood.

Anand Is Still World Champion

May 14, 2010

Viswanathan Anand has secured his historic position among the greatest chess players who have ever lived by defeating Topalov and retaining his World Champion title.  It seemed at times as if the unfriendly venue and team Topalov’s psychological ploys  might be too much for Vishy to overcome. Anand uncharacteristically missed several opportunities to put Topalov behind him and ended up going into the final game all tied up with the black pieces. The stage was set for Anand to deliver an epic performance  and he did not disappoint. From now on, no one will underestimate Anand’s determination and fighting spirit.

The Games from the 2010 World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Vesilin Topalov:

[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.24”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D86”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5
8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Na5 11. Bd3 b6 12.

Qd2 e5 13. Bh6 cxd4 14.
Bxg7 Kxg7 15. cxd4 exd4 16. Rac1 Qd6 17. f4 f6 18. f5 Qe5 19. Nf4 g5 20.
Nh5+ Kg8 21. h4 h6 22. hxg5

hxg5 23. Rf3 Kf7 24. Nxf6 Kxf6 25. Rh3 Rg8 26.
Rh6+ Kf7 27. Rh7+ Ke8 28. Rcc7 Kd8 29. Bb5 Qxe4 30. Rxc8+ 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.25”]

[Round “2”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8.
Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bd2 Nd5 11. Rc1 Nd7 12.

Nd3 Ba7 13. Ba5 Qe7 14.
Qb3 Rb8 15. Qa3 Qxa3 16. bxa3 N7f6 17. Nce5 Re8 18. Rc2 b6 19. Bd2 Bb7 20.
Rfc1 Rbd8 21. f4 Bb8 22. a4

a5 23. Nc6 Bxc6 24. Rxc6 h5 25. R1c4 Ne3 26.
Bxe3 dxe3 27. Bf3 g6 28. Rxb6 Ba7 29. Rb3 Rd4 30. Rc7 Bb8 31. Rc5 Bd6 32.
Rxa5 Rc8

33. Kg2 Rc2 34. a3 Ra2 35. Nb4 Bxb4 36. axb4 Nd5 37. b5 Raxa4 38.
Rxa4 Rxa4 39. Bxd5 exd5 40. b6 Ra8 41. b7 Rb8 42. Kf3 d4 43.

Ke4 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.27”]

[Round “3”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14.
Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h6 16. Ke2 Bd6 17. h5 Bh7 18. a5 Ke7 19. Na4 f6 20. b4 Rgc8
21. Bc5 Bxc5 22. bxc5 Rc7

23. Nb6 Rd8 24. Nxd7 Rdxd7 25. Bd3 Bg8 26. c6 Rd6
27. cxb7 Rxb7 28. Rc3 Bf7 29. Ke3 Be8 30. g4 e5 31. Rhc1 Bd7 32. Rc5 Bb5
33.

Bxb5 axb5 34. Rb1 b4 35. Rb3 Ra6 36. Kd3 Rba7 37. Rxb4 Rxa5 38. Rxa5
Rxa5 39. Rb7+ Kf8 40. Ke2 Ra2+ 41. Ke3 Ra3+ 42. Kf2 Ra2+

43. Ke3 Ra3+ 44.
Kf2 Ra2+ 45. Ke3 Ra3+ 46. Kf2 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.28”]

[Round “4”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 a5 7. Qc2 Bxd2+
8. Qxd2 c6 9. a4 b5 10. Na3 Bd7 11. Ne5 Nd5 12. e4

Nb4 13. O-O O-O 14. Rfd1
Be8 15. d5 Qd6 16. Ng4 Qc5 17. Ne3 N8a6 18. dxc6 bxa4 19. Naxc4 Bxc6 20.
Rac1 h6 21. Nd6 Qa7 22. Ng4

Rad8 23. Nxh6+ gxh6 24. Qxh6 f6 25. e5 Bxg2 26.
exf6 Rxd6 27. Rxd6 Be4 28. Rxe6 Nd3 29. Rc2 Qh7 30. f7+ Qxf7 31. Rxe4 Qf5
32.

Re7 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.30”]

[Round “5”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14.
Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h5 16. Ne2 Bd6 17. Be3 Ne5 18. Nf4 Rc8 19. Bb3 Rxc1+ 20.
Bxc1 Ke7 21. Ke2 Rc8 22. Bd2

f6 23. Nxg6+ Nxg6 24. g3 Ne5 25. f4 Nc6 26.
Bc3 Bb4 27. Bxb4+ Nxb4 28. Rd1 Nc6 29. Rd2 g5 30. Kf2 g4 31. Rc2 Rd8 32.
Ke3 Rd6

33. Rc5 Nb4 34. Rc7+ Kd8 35. Rc3 Ke7 36. e5 Rd7 37. exf6+ Kxf6 38.
Ke2 Nc6 39. Ke1 Nd4 40. Bd1 a5 41. Rc5 Nf5 42. Rc3 Nd4 43.

Rc5 Nf5 44. Rc3
1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.01”]

[Round “6”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8.
Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12.

Nd3 Ba7 13. Qa4 Nc6 14.
Rac1 e5 15. Bxc6 b5 16. Qc2 Qxc6 17. Ncxe5 Qe4 18. Qc6 Bb7 19. Qxe4 Bxe4
20. Rc2 Rfe8 21. Rfc1 f6 22.

Nd7 Bf5 23. N7c5 Bb6 24. Nb7 Bd7 25. Nf4 Rab8
26. Nd6 Re5 27. Nc8 Ba5 28. Nd3 Re8 29. Na7 Bb6 30. Nc6 Rb7 31. Ncb4 a5 32.
Nd5

a4 33. Nxb6 Rxb6 34. Nc5 Bf5 35. Rd2 Rc6 36. b4 axb3 37. axb3 b4 38.
Rxd4 Rxe2 39. Rxb4 Bh3 40. Rbc4 Rd6 41. Re4 Rb2 42. Ree1

Rdd2 43. Ne4 Rd4
44. Nc5 Rdd2 45. Ne4 Rd3 46. Rb1 Rdxb3 47. Nd2 Rb4 48. f3 g5 49. Rxb2 Rxb2
50. Rd1 Kf7 51. Kf2 h5 52. Ke3 Rc2

53. Ra1 Kg6 54. Ra6 Bf5 55. Rd6 Rc3+ 56.
Kf2 Rc2 57. Ke3 Rc3+ 58. Kf2 Rc2 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.03”]

[Round “7”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E10”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8.
Bf4 dxc4 9. Ne5 b5 10. Nxc6 Nxc6 11. Bxc6 Bd7 12.

Bxa8 Qxa8 13. f3 Nd5 14.
Bd2 e5 15. e4 Bh3 16. exd5 Bxf1 17. Qxf1 exd4 18. a4 Qxd5 19. axb5 Qxb5 20.
Rxa7 Re8 21. Kh1 Bf8 22.

Rc7 d3 23. Bc3 Bd6 24. Ra7 h6 25. Nd2 Bb4 26. Ra1
Bxc3 27. bxc3 Re2 28. Rd1 Qa4 29. Ne4 Qc2 30. Rc1 Rxh2+ 31. Kg1 Rg2+ 32.
Qxg2

Qxc1+ 33. Qf1 Qe3+ 34. Qf2 Qc1+ 35. Qf1 Qe3+ 36. Kg2 f5 37. Nf2 Kh7
38. Qb1 Qe6 39. Qb5 g5 40. g4 fxg4 41. fxg4 Kg6 42. Qb7 d2

43. Qb1+ Kg7 44.
Kf1 Qe7 45. Kg2 Qe6 46. Qd1 Qe3 47. Qf3 Qe6 48. Qb7+ Kg6 49. Qb1+ Kg7 50.
Qd1 Qe3 51. Qc2 Qe2 52. Qa4 Kg8 53.

Qd7 Kf8 54. Qd5 Kg7 55. Kg3 Qe3+ 56.
Qf3 Qe5+ 57. Kg2 Qe6 58. Qd1 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.04”]

[Round “8”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 Rc8 14.
Bb5 a6 15. Bxd7+ Kxd7 16. Ke2 f6 17. Rhd1 Ke8 18. a5 Be7 19. Bb6 Rf8 20.
Rac1 f5 21. e5 Bg5 22. Be3

f4 23. Ne4 Rxc1 24. Nd6+ Kd7 25. Bxc1 Kc6 26.
Bd2 Be7 27. Rc1+ Kd7 28. Bc3 Bxd6 29. Rd1 Bf5 30. h4 g6 31. Rxd6+ Kc8 32.
Bd2 Rd8

33. Bxf4 Rxd6 34. exd6 Kd7 35. Ke3 Bc2 36. Kd4 Ke8 37. Ke5 Kf7 38.
Be3 Ba4 39. Kf4 Bb5 40. Bc5 Kf6 41. Bd4+ Kf7 42. Kg5 Bc6

43. Kh6 Kg8 44. h5
Be8 45. Kg5 Kf7 46. Kh6 Kg8 47. Bc5 gxh5 48. Kg5 Kg7 49. Bd4+ Kf7 50. Be5
h4 51. Kxh4 Kg6 52. Kg4 Bb5 53.

Kf4 Kf7 54. Kg5 Bc6 55. Kh6 Kg8 56. g4 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.06”]

[Round “9”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E53”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O cxd4 8.
exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 b6 10. Bg5 Bb7 11. Re1 Nbd7 12.

Rc1 Rc8 13. Bd3 Re8 14.
Qe2 Bxc3 15. bxc3 Qc7 16. Bh4 Nh5 17. Ng5 g6 18. Nh3 e5 19. f3 Qd6 20. Bf2
exd4 21. Qxe8+ Rxe8 22.

Rxe8+ Nf8 23. cxd4 Nf6 24. Ree1 Ne6 25. Bc4 Bd5 26.
Bg3 Qb4 27. Be5 Nd7 28. a3 Qa4 29. Bxd5 Nxe5 30. Bxe6 Qxd4+ 31. Kh1 fxe6
32. Ng5 Qd6 33. Ne4 Qxa3 34. Rc3 Qb2 35. h4 b5 36. Rc8+ Kg7 37. Rc7+ Kf8
38. Ng5 Ke8 39. Rxh7 Qc3 40. Rh8+ Kd7 41. Rh7+ Kc6

42. Re4 b4 43. Nxe6 Kb6
44. Nf4 Qa1+ 45. Kh2 a5 46. h5 gxh5 47. Rxh5 Nc6 48. Nd5+ Kb7 49. Rh7+ Ka6
50. Re6 Kb5 51. Rh5 Nd4 52.

Nb6+ Ka6 53. Rd6 Kb7 54. Nc4 Nxf3+ 55. gxf3
Qa2+ 56. Nd2 Kc7 57. Rhd5 b3 58. Rd7+ Kc8 59. Rd8+ Kc7 60. R8d7+ Kc8 61.
Rg7 a4 62.

Rc5+ Kb8 63. Rd5 Kc8 64. Kg3 Qa1 65. Rg4 b2 66. Rc4+ Kb7 67. Kf2
b1=Q 68. Nxb1 Qxb1 69. Rdd4 Qa2+ 70. Kg3 a3 71. Rc3 Qa1 72.

Rb4+ Ka6 73.
Ra4+ Kb5 74. Rcxa3 Qg1+ 75. Kf4 Qc1+ 76. Kf5 Qc5+ 77. Ke4 Qc2+ 78. Ke3 Qc1+
79. Kf2 Qd2+ 80. Kg3 Qe1+ 81. Kf4 Qc1+

82. Kg3 Qg1+ 83. Kf4 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.07”]

[Round “10”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D86”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5
8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O b6 11. Qd2 Bb7 12.

Rac1 Rc8 13. Rfd1 cxd4 14.
cxd4 Qd6 15. d5 Na5 16. Bb5 Rxc1 17. Rxc1 Rc8 18. h3 Rxc1+ 19. Qxc1 e6 20.
Nf4 exd5 21. Nxd5 f5 22.

f3 fxe4 23. fxe4 Qe5 24. Bd3 Nc6 25. Ba6 Nd4 26.
Qc4 Bxd5 27. Qxd5+ Qxd5 28. exd5 Be5 29. Kf2 Kf7 30. Bg5 Nf5 31. g4 Nd6 32.
Kf3 Ne8 33. Bc1 Nc7 34. Bd3 Bd6 35. Ke4 b5 36. Kd4 a6 37. Be2 Ke7 38. Bg5+
Kd7 39. Bd2 Bg3 40. g5 Bf2+ 41. Ke5 Bg3+ 42. Ke4

Ne8 43. Bg4+ Ke7 44. Be6
Nd6+ 45. Kf3 Nc4 46. Bc1 Bd6 47. Ke4 a5 48. Bg4 Ba3 49. Bxa3+ Nxa3 50. Ke5
Nc4+ 51. Kd4 Kd6 52. Be2

Na3 53. h4 Nc2+ 54. Kc3 Nb4 55. Bxb5 Nxa2+ 56. Kb3
Nb4 57. Be2 Nxd5 58. h5 Nf4 59. hxg6 hxg6 60. Bc4 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.09”]

[Round “11”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “A29”]

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7
8. a3 O-O 9. b4 Be6 10. d3 f6 11. Ne4 Qe8 12. Nc5

Bxc5 13. bxc5 Nd5 14. Bb2
Rd8 15. Qc2 Nde7 16. Rab1 Ba2 17. Rbc1 Qf7 18. Bc3 Rd7 19. Qb2 Rb8 20. Rfd1
Be6 21. Rd2 h6 22. Qb1

Nd5 23. Rb2 b6 24. cxb6 cxb6 25. Bd2 Rd6 26. Rbc2
Qd7 27. h4 Rd8 28. Qb5 Nde7 29. Qb2 Bd5 30. Bb4 Nxb4 31. axb4 Rc6 32. b5
Rxc2

33. Rxc2 Be6 34. d4 e4 35. Nd2 Qxd4 36. Nxe4 Qxb2 37. Rxb2 Kf7 38. e3
g5 39. hxg5 hxg5 40. f4 gxf4 41. exf4 Rd4 42. Kf2 Nf5

43. Bf3 Bd5 44. Nd2
Bxf3 45. Nxf3 Ra4 46. g4 Nd6 47. Kg3 Ne4+ 48. Kh4 Nd6 49. Rd2 Nxb5 50. f5
Re4 51. Kh5 Re3 52. Nh4 Nc3 53.

Rd7+ Re7 54. Rd3 Ne4 55. Ng6 Nc5 56. Ra3
Rd7 57. Re3 Kg7 58. g5 b5 59. Nf4 b4 60. g6 b3 61. Rc3 Rd4 62. Rxc5 Rxf4
63. Rc7+ Kg8

64. Rb7 Rf3 65. Rb8+ Kg7 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.11”]

[Round “12”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “0-1”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D56”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 Ne4 8.
Bxe7 Qxe7 9. Rc1 c6 10. Be2 Nxc3 11. Rxc3 dxc4 12.

Bxc4 Nd7 13. O-O b6 14.
Bd3 c5 15. Be4 Rb8 16. Qc2 Nf6 17. dxc5 Nxe4 18. Qxe4 bxc5 19. Qc2 Bb7 20.
Nd2 Rfd8 21. f3 Ba6 22. Rf2

Rd7 23. g3 Rbd8 24. Kg2 Bd3 25. Qc1 Ba6 26. Ra3
Bb7 27. Nb3 Rc7 28. Na5 Ba8 29. Nc4 e5 30. e4 f5 31. exf5 e4 32. fxe4 Qxe4+
33.

Kh3 Rd4 34. Ne3 Qe8 35. g4 h5 36. Kh4 g5+ 37. fxg6 Qxg6 38. Qf1 Rxg4+
39. Kh3 Re7 40. Rf8+ Kg7 41. Nf5+ Kh7 42. Rg3 Rxg3+ 43.

hxg3 Qg4+ 44. Kh2
Re2+ 45. Kg1 Rg2+ 46. Qxg2 Bxg2 47. Kxg2 Qe2+ 48. Kh3 c4 49. a4 a5 50. Rf6
Kg8 51. Nh6+ Kg7 52. Rb6 Qe4 53.

Kh2 Kh7 54. Rd6 Qe5 55. Nf7 Qxb2+ 56. Kh3
Qg7 0-1

FIDE Top 100

November 9, 2009

Below is the FIDE top 100 list for November(source http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/).  Vugar Gashimov broke into the top 10 for the first time in his career. Born in 1986,  Mr. Gashimov  hails from Azerbaijan and is known for his extreme skill in one minute chess. Below is a recent example of his Brilliant play against American grandmaster Gata Kamsky:

[Event "Baku Grand Prix"]
[Site "Baku AZE"]
[Date "2008.04.28"]
[EventDate "2008.04.21"]
[Round "7"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Vugar Gashimov"]
[Black "Gata Kamsky"]
[ECO "C84"]
[WhiteElo "2679"]
[BlackElo "2726"]
[PlyCount "103"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5
7. Bb3 O-O 8. h3 Bb7 9. d3 d6 10. a3 Qd7 11. Nbd2 Rfe8 12. Nf1
Nd8 13. Ng3 Ne6 14. Ba2 c5 15. Bd2 Bf8 16. b4 h6 17. c4 Nf4
18. Re3 bxc4 19. dxc4 Ne6 20. Bb1 g6 21. Re1 Qc7 22. Bd3 Bg7
23. Rb1 Nd7 24. Ne2 Nd4 25. Nc3 Rec8 26. Rc1 Qd8 27. Nd5 Bc6
28. Bf1 Nf8 29. Nxd4 exd4 30. f4 Nd7 31. Qf3 Rcb8 32. Qg3 cxb4
33. axb4 a5 34. b5 Bxd5 35. cxd5 Nc5 36. e5 a4 37. Bb4 a3
38. Bxa3 d3 39. Bxc5 d2 40. Bxd6 Rb7 41. Red1 dxc1=Q 42. Rxc1
Rba7 43. Qb3 Ra1 44. Bc7 Qh4 45. Rxa1 Rxa1 46. Qf3 Qe1 47. b6
Qb4 48. d6 Qd4+ 49. Kh2 Rb1 50. b7 Rxb7 51. Qxb7 Qxf4+ 52. g3
1-0
FIDE Rating List November 2009 Top 100
Rk Se09 Name Title NAT YroB ap08 ju08 oc08 ja09 ap09 ju09 se09 Rating Gms
1 1 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 1975 2767 2777 2791 2796 2812 2813 2813 2810 10
2 4 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 1990 2765 2775 2786 2776 2770 2772 2772 2801 10
3 2 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 1969 2803 2798 2783 2791 2783 2788 2788 2788 0
4 3 Aronian, Levon g ARM 1982 2763 2737 2757 2750 2754 2768 2773 2786 13
5 5 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 1975 2788 2788 2772 2759 2759 2759 2772 2772 0
6 14 Gashimov, Vugar g AZE 1986 2679 2717 2703 2723 2730 2740 2740 2758 11
7 9 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 1968 2723 2720 2719 2733 2733 2755 2756 2758 11
8 12 Svidler, Peter g RUS 1976 2746 2738 2727 2723 2726 2739 2741 2754 17
9 6 Leko, Peter g HUN 1979 2741 2741 2747 2751 2751 2756 2762 2752 10
10 10 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 1977 2774 2788 2787 2771 2751 2751 2750 2750 0
11 7 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 1987 2751 2744 2751 2761 2756 2756 2757 2748 10
12 8 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 1969 2740 2781 2786 2779 2746 2703 2756 2739 13
13 13 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 1983 2719 2718 2719 2726 2726 2727 2741 2739 5
14 17 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 1983 2716 2728 2719 2733 2748 2733 2733 2736 13
15 11 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 1983 2711 2709 2737 2760 2753 2760 2742 2736 10
16 15 Wang, Yue g CHN 1987 2689 2704 2736 2739 2738 2736 2736 2734 27
17 24 Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 1983 2687 2716 2720 2693 2693 2716 2717 2729 15
18 20 Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 1990 2732 2727 2730 2706 2721 2717 2722 2723 12
19 21 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 1985 2752 2742 2731 2724 2725 2717 2721 2719 25
20 18 Shirov, Alexei g ESP 1972 2740 2741 2726 2745 2745 2732 2730 2719 18
21 22 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 1983 2695 2708 2719 2717 2721 2716 2719 2719 0
22 26 Movsesian, Sergei g SVK 1978 2695 2723 2732 2751 2747 2716 2711 2718 16
23 23 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 1990 2632 2681 2716 2696 2684 2703 2718 2718 0
24 16 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 1987 2686 2697 2704 2699 2701 2710 2735 2715 17
25 19 Alekseev, Evgeny g RUS 1985 2711 2708 2715 2718 2716 2714 2725 2715 7
26 36 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 1982 2684 2650 2664 2702 2688 2693 2696 2711 20
27 44 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 1987 2658 2646 2646 2664 2684 2689 2688 2708 21
28 42 Wang, Hao g CHN 1989 2689 2704 2736 2739 2696 2690 2690 2708 13
29 29 Short, Nigel D g ENG 1965 2660 2655 2642 2663 2674 2684 2706 2707 16
30 39 Navara, David g CZE 1985 2672 2646 2633 2638 2654 2687 2692 2707 9
31 25 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 1980 2689 2689 2675 2692 2709 2707 2715 2706 26
32 31 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam g UZB 1979 2681 2679 2672 2687 2695 2672 2702 2705 5
33 48 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 1976 2674 2668 2663 2680 2685 2684 2685 2704 15
34 28 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 1983 2705 2691 2705 2722 2728 2721 2709 2700 27
35 34 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 1971 2673 2673 2679 2700 2696 2712 2698 2700 7
36 50 Adams, Michael g ENG 1971 2729 2735 2734 2712 2703 2699 2682 2698 12
37 30 Rublevsky, Sergei g RUS 1974 2695 2699 2702 2702 2702 2703 2703 2697 17
38 45 Nielsen, Peter Heine g DEN 1973 2629 2652 2662 2660 2668 2680 2687 2697 10
39 35 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 1983 2658 2665 2664 2669 2687 2684 2696 2696 0
40 27 Motylev, Alexander g RUS 1979 2666 2674 2672 2676 2677 2710 2710 2695 23
41 38 Kamsky, Gata g USA 1974 2726 2723 2729 2725 2720 2717 2692 2695 16
42 53 Vitiugov, Nikita g RUS 1987 2617 2616 2638 2687 2688 2681 2681 2694 24
43 43 Bologan, Viktor g MDA 1971 2665 2686 2682 2687 2690 2689 2688 2692 24
44 52 Volokitin, Andrei g UKR 1986 2684 2672 2659 2671 2671 2678 2681 2691 16
45 47 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 1985 2623 2665 2678 2693 2700 2697 2685 2689 26
46 41 Miroshnichenko, Evgenij g UKR 1978 2642 2593 2632 2667 2680 2696 2690 2686 26
47 32 Bu, Xiangzhi g CHN 1985 2708 2710 2714 2702 2704 2702 2702 2682 22
48 46 Polgar, Judit g HUN 1976 2709 2711 2711 2693 2693 2687 2687 2680 6
49 37 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 1980 2650 2632 2678 2676 2690 2682 2694 2677 17
50 67 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 1976 2684 2692 2684 2675 2675 2675 2664 2677 14
51 54 Sargissian, Gabriel g ARM 1983 2643 2660 2642 2678 2660 2667 2678 2676 16
52 33 Onischuk, Alexander g USA 1975 2664 2670 2644 2659 2684 2699 2699 2672 18
53 56 Harikrishna, P. g IND 1986 2679 2668 2659 2673 2686 2679 2673 2672 16
54 68 Georgiev, Kiril g BUL 1965 2665 2671 2645 2634 2637 2645 2663 2672 13
55 62 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 1986 2695 2687 2696 2679 2678 2678 2667 2671 5
56 83 Efimenko, Zahar g UKR 1985 2660 2670 2680 2688 2682 2654 2654 2668 24
57 55 Sutovsky, Emil g ISR 1977 2630 2654 2651 2660 2660 2675 2676 2666 26
58 59 Kurnosov, Igor g RUS 1985 2593 2617 2606 2602 2658 2669 2669 2666 20
59 51 Najer, Evgeniy g RUS 1977 2627 2670 2682 2669 2669 2663 2681 2666 17
60 40 Ni, Hua g CHN 1983 2703 2705 2710 2709 2724 2701 2692 2665 35
61 57 Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 1973 2634 2645 2686 2684 2697 2674 2670 2664 34
62 63 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 1986 2650 2664 2664 2673 2657 2651 2667 2664 16
63 81 Landa, Konstantin g RUS 1972 2633 2615 2613 2626 2627 2655 2655 2664 16
64 74 Sasikiran, Krishnan g IND 1981 2679 2684 2694 2711 2682 2669 2661 2664 9
65 88 Smirin, Ilia g ISR 1968 2630 2637 2649 2647 2641 2650 2648 2662 16
66 69 Berkes, Ferenc g HUN 1985 2618 2645 2645 2651 2638 2647 2663 2661 21
67 93 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 1985 2638 2617 2656 2634 2635 2647 2646 2661 16
68 78 Roiz, Michael g ISR 1983 2659 2680 2677 2647 2635 2658 2658 2659 3
69 85 Krasenkow, Michal g POL 1963 2624 2639 2624 2620 2622 2631 2651 2656 19
70 90 Lastin, Alexander g RUS 1976 2622 2639 2651 2643 2650 2648 2648 2656 11
71 70 Pashikian, Arman g ARM 1987 2537 2564 2611 2621 2655 2650 2663 2656 11
72 71 Dreev, Alexey g RUS 1969 2657 2657 2670 2688 2668 2660 2662 2655 44
73 92 Baklan, Vladimir g UKR 1978 2647 2631 2625 2627 2618 2639 2646 2655 32
74 60 Avrukh, Boris g ISR 1978 2632 2656 2657 2645 2647 2641 2668 2655 7
75 Ganguly, Surya Shekhar g IND 1983 2614 2631 2603 2614 2625 2637 2634 2654 25
76 95 Fier, Alexandr g BRA 1988 2527 2558 2581 2590 2595 2604 2644 2653 28
77 100 Kazhgaleyev, Murtas g KAZ 1973 2617 2641 2640 2630 2626 2639 2643 2653 15
78 77 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 1981 2656 2673 2676 2666 2664 2667 2658 2653 14
79 65 Meier, Georg g GER 1987 2560 2556 2558 2608 2641 2658 2664 2653 10
80 49 Grachev, Boris g RUS 1986 2610 2640 2653 2655 2652 2669 2684 2652 23
81 72 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 1992 2620 2630 2640 2646 2649 2670 2662 2652 21
82 82 Predojevic, Borki g BIH 1987 2651 2634 2615 2650 2652 2644 2654 2652 17
83 86 Van Wely, Loek g NED 1972 2676 2644 2618 2625 2622 2655 2650 2652 15
84 79 Sokolov, Ivan g BIH 1968 2690 2658 2650 2657 2669 2655 2657 2652 11
85 76 Milov, Vadim g SUI 1972 2690 2705 2681 2669 2659 2659 2659 2652 5
86 61 Timofeev, Artyom g RUS 1985 2664 2650 2670 2671 2677 2681 2668 2651 22
87 84 Postny, Evgeny g ISR 1981 2649 2661 2674 2652 2648 2647 2651 2650 26
88 Smeets, Jan g NED 1985 2578 2593 2604 2601 2626 2632 2642 2650 17
89 73 Fridman, Daniel g GER 1976 2640 2637 2630 2650 2646 2665 2661 2649 15
90 94 Seirawan, Yasser g USA 1960 2630 2634 2634 2634 2634 2646 2646 2649 1
91 Vescovi, Giovanni g BRA 1978 2617 2631 2635 2635 2631 2631 2636 2648 19
92 80 Beliavsky, Alexander G g SLO 1953 2641 2606 2619 2646 2640 2662 2656 2648 17
93 91 Zhigalko, Sergei g BLR 1989 2568 2583 2592 2587 2622 2621 2646 2646 0
94 66 Inarkiev, Ernesto g RUS 1985 2684 2675 2669 2656 2676 2675 2664 2645 21
95 Savchenko, Boris g RUS 1986 2569 2578 2648 2654 2655 2650 2638 2644 29
96 Khismatullin, Denis g RUS 1984 2584 2613 2606 2601 2601 2604 2614 2643 16
97 Socko, Bartosz g POL 1978 2644 2627 2631 2631 2637 2656 2637 2643 15
98 89 Kobalia, Mikhail g RUS 1978 2627 2618 2630 2634 2645 2645 2648 2643 9
99 Korobov, Anton g UKR 1985 2590 2590 2605 2613 2616 2623 2633 2642 14
100 58 Tkachiev, Vladislav g FRA 1973 2657 2664 2664 2657 2657 2650 2669 2642 14

Kramnik vs. Anand

October 4, 2008

Just ten days until the Anand vs. Kramnik World Chess Championship match of 2008!

Tonight I present another preview game for the upcoming World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik. The game I chose is a recent example of the two contenders going head to head in a major event.  My analysis is above the game that was played at the Corus tournament in 2007.  Enjoy!

chessbase.com)

Kramnik vs. Anand (source:chessbase.com)

10…Ra7 Anand starts to mix it up early. 10… Be4 is a lot more natural and common in the Catalan.

16. a3 Kramnik’s invention. This move serves to limit Anand’s bishop on the queen-side.

22…Nc4 Perhaps Anand should have tried 22… Bc4 23. Nxc4 Nxc4 and Anand has a knight to harass Kramnik with.

25…c6 Anand’s pawn had been under attack at c7. However, moving forward allows Kramnik to control the d8 square with his Bishop.

26. Rd1 is real trouble for Anand due to the fact that Kramnik’s Bishop forces Anand to place a rook on d7 rather than d8.

28. Rd1 Now Kramnik controls the d file.

30. f4 Is a very interesting move by Kramnik. 30. Qd4 forms a nice battery on the d file and is what most strong players would play. However, Kramnik must feel he wants his queen leading the charge on the d file.

30… Re6 Anand attempts to punish Kramnik’s last move by forcing his rook to retreat. Even with the retreat, Kramnik will still control the open file.  

32. Qd4 Kramnik reveals his intentions of having the queen lead down the d file.

36. e5 Kramnik unleashes his bishop on g2. Another way of activating the bishop would have been moving it to h3.

43. a4 Kramnik delivers a knock-out blow to Anand with his a pawn.  

 

[Event “Corus A”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
[Date “2007.??.??”]
[White “Kramnik,V”]
[Black “Anand,V”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2766”]
[BlackElo “2779”]
[ECO “E06”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3
O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. Qxc4 b5 9. Qc2
Bb7 10. Bd2 Ra7 11. Rc1 Be4 12. Qb3 Nc6 13. e3
Qa8 14. Qd1 Nb8 15. Ba5 Rc8 16. a3 Bd6 17. Nbd2
Bd5 18. Qf1 Nbd7 19. b4 e5 20. dxe5 Bxe5 21. Nxe5
Nxe5 22. f3 Nc4 23. Nxc4 Bxc4 24. Qf2 Re8 25. e4
c6 26. Rd1 Rd7 27. Rxd7 Nxd7 28. Rd1 Qb7 29. Rd6
f6 30. f4 Re6 31. Rd2 Re7 32. Qd4 Nf8 33. Qd8
Rd7 34. Rxd7 Qxd7 35. Qxd7 Nxd7 36. e5 fxe5 37. Bxc6
Nf6 38. Bb7 exf4 39. gxf4 Nd5 40. Kf2 Nxf4 41. Ke3
g5 42. Bxa6 Kf7 43. a4 Ke7 44. Bxb5 Bxb5 45. axb5
Kd7 46. Ke4 Ne2 47. Bb6 g4 48. Bf2 Nc3+ 49. Kf5
Nxb5 50. Kxg4 Ke6 51. Kg5 Kf7 52. Kf5 Ke7 53. Bc5+
 1-0

The 2700 Club Is Becoming Crowded!

September 30, 2008

The October 2008 FIDE Rating List now has 32 players with ratings above 2700. Here they are in order of ranking:

2005 WCC Press

Topalov wins 2005 World Chess Championships. source: 2005 WCC Press

Rank Name Country Rating

1Topalov, VeselinBUL 2791
2Morozevich, AlexanderRUS 2787
3Ivanchuk, VassilyUKR 2786
4Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2786
5Anand, Viswanathan IND 2783
6Kramnik, VladimirRUS 2772
7Aronian, Levon ARM 2757
8Radjabov, TeimourAZE 2751
9Leko, Peter HUN 2747
10Jakovenko, DmitryRUS 2737
11Wang, YueCHN 2736
12 Adams, Michael ENG 2734
13Movsesian, SergeiSVK 2732
14Mamedyarov, ShakhriyarAZE 2731
15Karjakin, SergeyUKR 2730
16Kamsky, Gata USA 2729
17Svidler, PeterRUS 2727
18Shirov, Alexei ESP 2726
19Eljanov, PavelUKR 2720
20Gelfand, BorisISR 2719
21Dominguez Perez, Leinier CUB 2719
22Ponomariov, RuslanUKR 2719
23Grischuk, AlexanderRUS 2719
24Vachier-Lagrave, MaximeFRA 2716
25Alekseev, EvgenyRUS 2715
26Bu, XiangzhiCHN 2714
27Polgar, Judit HUN 2711
28Ni, HuaCHN 2710
29Bacrot, EtienneFRA 2705
30Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2704
31Gashimov, VugarAZE 2703
32Rublevsky, SergeiRUS 2702


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