Posts Tagged ‘Anand’

Anand-Gelfand 2012: Anand Wins

May 31, 2012

Indian Grand Master Viswanathan Anand has successfully defended his title in the 2012 FIDE World Chess Championship Match. Previously, Anand held the FIDE World Champion title from 2000 to 2002. He then became the undisputed World Champion in 2007 and defended this title against Kramnik in 2008. In 2010, he successfully defended his title against Topalov. The 2012 FIDE World Chess Championship match against Boris Gelfand may have been his most difficult title defense to date.  The classical time control 12 game match ended in a draw so Anand and Gelfand were required to play  four games of rapid chess to determine who would be the World Chess Champion. Anand bested Gelfand with a score of 2.5/4 and thus defended his World Tititle again. By winning the FIDE World Chess Championship for a fifth time, Viswanathan Anand should be considered the greatest chess player of his era.

Anand-Gelfand 2012: Round 1

May 11, 2012

Round 1 of the 2012 World Chess Championship between Viswanathan Anand and Boris Gelfand was a spectacular contest. My only disappointment with the game is that it did not last longer.

Anand, as I had predicted, played 1. d4 to kick things off. It was Boris Gelfand’s choice of the Grunfeld Defense which surprised chess enthusiasts the world over. Gelfand, as far as I can tell, has never employed this opening in a serious game. The game quickly becomes complicated and the contestants rise to the occasion with very precise moves. I consider the draw to be a psychological win for Anand as he played very well against his opponent’s preparation. On the other side of the coin, Boris Gelfand must be pleased to get a half point with the black pieces as drawing with black and winning with white is a grand master recipe for success.

 

[Event “Anand-Gelfand World Chess Championship”]

[Site “Moscow RUS”]

[Date “2012.05.11”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Viswanathan Anand”]

[Black “Boris Gelfand”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[ECO “D85”]

[Opening “Grünfeld”]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Bb5+ {Rb1 is a favorite among players of the white pieces.} Nc6 9. d5 Qa5 {Black has scored better than white in this line. Its a good choice by Gelfand.} 10. Rb1 {White has only won 27% of the time from here. But as we see later, Anand is at home in this position.} a6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. O-O Qxa2 13. Rb2 {This move is an invention by Anand. Both should be in unchartered territory here. However, I get the feeling that Gelfand had even prepared for this.} Qa5 14. d6 Ra7 15. Bg5 exd6 16. Qxd6 Rd7 17. Qxc6 Qc7 18. Qxc7 Rxc7 19. Bf4 Rb7 20. Rc2 {Ra2 would have been a more aggressive choice.} O-O 21. Bd6 Re8 22. Nd2 f5 {I was surprised by this move. But why not? Anand has no pieces that use light diagonals left.} 23. f3 fxe4 24. Nxe4 Bf5 {I like black’s position better here. Too bad the game did not continue. It could have been a very interesting endgame study.} 1/2-1/2

Tal Memorial 2011: Round 3

November 19, 2011

Black Friday came early this year for fans of chess. Three games in round three of the 2011 Tal Memorial were won by black with the remaining two games being drawn. For the uninitiated, playing white in chess is akin to having the serve in Tennis. It is an extremely rare occasion to have black dominate on the majority of boards in a tournament of this caliber.

Below are the games from round 3 of the 2011 Tal Memorial in Moscow, Russia:

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2011.11.18”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “B Gelfand”]
[Black “Sergey Karjakin”]
[ECO “E06”]
[WhiteElo “2744”]
[BlackElo “2763”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. a4 Bd7 9. Qxc4 Bc6 10. Bf4 a5 11. Nc3 Na6 12. Ne5 Bxg2 13. Kxg2 Nd5 14. Rad1 Nxf4+ 15. gxf4 Bd6 16. Rd3 Qe8 17. Rf3 Nb4 18. Nb5 f6 19. Nd3 Nxd3 20. Qxd3 Rd8 21. Rh3 f5 22. e3 Qc6+ 23. Kg1 Bb4 24. Rg3 Qd7 25. Qb3 c6 26. Nc3 b5 27. Rc1 Rb8 28. axb5 cxb5 29. d5 Rfe8 30. dxe6 Qxe6 31. Nd5 Kh8 32. Rc7 Rbd8 33. e4 Bf8 34. Qc3 b4 35. Qd4 Rd7 36. Qa7 Rxc7 37. Nxc7 Qf7 38. Qxa5 Rc8 39. Nd5 fxe4 40. Ne3 Qxf4 41. Qd5 Bd6 42. Qb7 Qf8 43. Rh3 Re8 44. Rh5 Qf3 45. Rg5 Rg8 46. Qc6 Qf4 47. Rg2 Be5 48. Qc4 Rb8 49. b3 h6 50. Rg3 Rf8 51. Rg2 Ra8 52. Qc6 Ra1+ 53. Nf1 Qf5 54. Qb6 Rd1 55. Qa6 Bd4 56. Qe2 Rd3 57. Rg3 Rc3 58. Qd2 Be5 59. Ne3 Qe6 0-1

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2011.11.18”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Hi Nakamura”]
[Black “P Svidler”]
[ECO “D86”]
[WhiteElo “2758”]
[BlackElo “2755”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. f3 Bd7 12. Rb1 Qc7 13. Bd3 Rfd8 14. Qd2 a6 15. f4 e6 16. dxc5 Na5 17. Nd4 e5 18. fxe5 Qxe5 19. Qb2 Rac8 20. Qb4 Qxc5 21. Qxc5 Rxc5 22. Ne2 Rc6 23. Bb6 Rxb6 24. Rxb6 Bc6 25. Rf3 f5 26. Rb4 Bf8 27. Rd4 Bc5 28. Re3 Re8 29. e5 Bd5 30. Kf2 Bxa2 31. Ra4 Bxe3+ 32. Kxe3 Rxe5+ 33. Kf4 Bb3 34. Kxe5 Bxa4 35. Kd6 Bc6 36. g3 Kg7 37. Nd4 Be4 38. Bxe4 fxe4 39. Nc2 Nc4+ 40. Kd5 Nd2 41. Kc5 Kf6 42. Kb6 Ke5 43. Kxb7 Kd5 44. Ne3+ Kc5 45. Kxa6 Nb1 46. Kb7 Nxc3 47. Kc8 Kd4 48. Ng2 Ke5 0-1

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2011.11.18”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “V Ivanchuk”]
[Black “L Aronian”]
[ECO “C67”]
[WhiteElo “2775”]
[BlackElo “2802”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 Ke8 10. h3 h5 11. Bf4 Bd7 12. Rad1 Rd8 13. b3 Be7 14. Rfe1 Bb4 15. Bd2 Bc8 16. Ne2 Bxd2 17. Nxd2 Ne7 18. Nc4 Nd5 19. a3 Ke7 20. f3 h4 21. Kf2 Rh5 22. Rd2 Re8 23. Nd4 Kf8 24. a4 a6 25. a5 Nb4 26. Ne2 Nd5 27. Nd4 Ne7 28. Re4 Rh6 29. f4 Nd5 30. Kf3 Rg6 31. f5 Rh6 32. Re1 c5 33. Ne2 Ne7 34. Nf4 Nxf5 35. c3 Ne7 36. Red1 Ng6 37. Nd3 Be6 38. Re1 Rh5 39. Kf2 Rf5+ 40. Kg1 Bxc4 41. bxc4 Nxe5 42. Rde2 f6 43. Re4 b6 44. axb6 cxb6 45. Rxh4 Ng6 46. Rhe4 Rxe4 47. Rxe4 Kf7 48. Re2 Ne5 49. g4 Rf3 50. Nxe5+ fxe5 51. Kg2 Rxc3 52. Rf2+ Kg6 53. Rb2 a5 54. Rxb6+ Kg5 55. Rb5 a4 56. Rxc5 Kf4 57. Ra5 a3 0-1

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2011.11.18”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “V Anand”]
[Black “I Nepomniachtchi”]
[ECO “D97”]
[WhiteElo “2811”]
[BlackElo “2730”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 a6 8. Be2 b5 9. Qb3 Nc6 10. e5 Be6 11. Qd1 Nd5 12. O-O Nxc3 13. bxc3 Bd5 14. Be3 Na5 15. Nd2 c5 16. Bf3 cxd4 17. cxd4 Nc4 18. Nxc4 bxc4 19. Rc1 e6 20. Qa4 Bxf3 21. gxf3 Qd5 22. Rxc4 Qxf3 23. Rfc1 Qg4+ 24. Kh1 Qe4+ 25. Kg1 Qg4+ 26. Kh1 Qe4+ 27. Kg1 1/2-1/2

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “0:43:33-0:45:33”]
[Date “2011.11.18”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Carlsen”]
[ECO “A00”]

1.c4 e5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 h6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.e4 Nc6 6.Nge2 Bc5 7.d3 d6 8.h3 Nh7 9.a3 a6 10.O-O Ng5 11.Kh2 Ne6 12.f4 Bd7 13.b4 Ba7 14.Nd5 Ned4 15.Nec3 Be6 16.f5 Bd7 17.Rb1 Nb8 18.c5 dxc5 19.bxc5 Bc8 20.Qh5 Nd7 21.Na4 c6 22.Ndb6 Nxc5 23.f6 g5 24.Bxg5 Nxa4 25.Nxa8 b5 26.Be3 Bb8 27.g4 Rg8 28.Qxh6 Be6 29.Rbc1 Kd7 30.Bxd4 exd4+ 31.e5 Nc3 32.Rxc3 Bxe5+ 33.Kh1 dxc3 34.Qe3 Qb8 35.Qc5 Qd6 36.Qa7+ Kd8 37.Qxa6 Bd4 38.Qa5+ Kc8 39.Qa6+ Kd8 40.Qa5+ Kc8 41.Qa6+ 1/2-1/2

“Thought I was completely winning and Svidler defended correctly…oh well, at least it is Friday night and the girls are out in Moscow!”

Hikaru Nakamura on Twitter.

Tal Memorial 2011: Round 1

November 18, 2011

The first round of the 2011 Tal Memorial featured two decisive games and plenty of hard fought draws. Ian Nepomniachtchi, the lowest rated player in the tournament, used the black pieces to secure a win against the former World Champion Vladimir Kramnik. Vassily Ivanchuk started another tournament with a win by punishing Peter Svidler’s inaccuracies on moves 29 and 30 in their 61 move affair. World Champion Viswanathan Anand worried his fans by making several mistakes but was still able to obtain a draw against Sergei Karjakin. World number one Magnus Carlsen drew in a difficult battle against Levon Aronian. Finally, the American, Hikaru Nakamura looked uninspired in his draw against Boris Gelfland.

Below is Ian Nepomniachtchi’s impressive win over Vladimir Kramnik:

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2011.11.16”]
[EventDate “2011.11.16”]
[Round “1”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Ian Nepomniachtchi”]
[ECO “A37”]
[WhiteElo “2800”]
[BlackElo “2730”]
[PlyCount “106”]

1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. a3 d6 7. O-O Nge7 8. b4 e4 9. Ne1 f5 10. Bb2 O-O 11. d3 Be6 12. dxe4 fxe4 13. Bxe4 Bxc4 14. Nc2 d5 15. Bg2 d4 16. Ne4 Bxe2 17. Qxe2 d3 18. Qg4 Bxb2 19. Rad1 Qc8 20. Qxc8 Raxc8 21. Rxd3 cxb4 22. axb4 Rcd8 23. Rxd8 Rxd8 24. Rb1 Bg7 25. h4 b5 26. Bf1 a6 27. Nc5 Rd2 28. Ne3 Bd4 29. Ne4 Rb2 30. Rxb2 Bxb2 31. Nc2 Nd5 32. Nc5 Ndxb4 33. Nxb4 Nxb4 34. Nd3 Nxd3 35. Bxd3 Kf7 36. f4 Ke6 37. Kf2 Kd5 38. Ke2 Kc5 39. Kd2 a5 40. f5 a4 41. Bc2 a3 42. Bb1 gxf5 43. Kc2 Kb4 44. Ba2 Be5 45. Be6 a2 46. Bxa2 Bxg3 47. h5 h6 48. Kd3 Ka3 49. Bd5 b4 50. Kc2 Be5 51. Bb3 f4 52. Bd5 Bf6 53. Kb1 b3 0-1

Anand Is Still World Champion

May 14, 2010

Viswanathan Anand has secured his historic position among the greatest chess players who have ever lived by defeating Topalov and retaining his World Champion title.  It seemed at times as if the unfriendly venue and team Topalov’s psychological ploys  might be too much for Vishy to overcome. Anand uncharacteristically missed several opportunities to put Topalov behind him and ended up going into the final game all tied up with the black pieces. The stage was set for Anand to deliver an epic performance  and he did not disappoint. From now on, no one will underestimate Anand’s determination and fighting spirit.

The Games from the 2010 World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Vesilin Topalov:

[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.24”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D86”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5
8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Na5 11. Bd3 b6 12.

Qd2 e5 13. Bh6 cxd4 14.
Bxg7 Kxg7 15. cxd4 exd4 16. Rac1 Qd6 17. f4 f6 18. f5 Qe5 19. Nf4 g5 20.
Nh5+ Kg8 21. h4 h6 22. hxg5

hxg5 23. Rf3 Kf7 24. Nxf6 Kxf6 25. Rh3 Rg8 26.
Rh6+ Kf7 27. Rh7+ Ke8 28. Rcc7 Kd8 29. Bb5 Qxe4 30. Rxc8+ 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.25”]

[Round “2”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8.
Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bd2 Nd5 11. Rc1 Nd7 12.

Nd3 Ba7 13. Ba5 Qe7 14.
Qb3 Rb8 15. Qa3 Qxa3 16. bxa3 N7f6 17. Nce5 Re8 18. Rc2 b6 19. Bd2 Bb7 20.
Rfc1 Rbd8 21. f4 Bb8 22. a4

a5 23. Nc6 Bxc6 24. Rxc6 h5 25. R1c4 Ne3 26.
Bxe3 dxe3 27. Bf3 g6 28. Rxb6 Ba7 29. Rb3 Rd4 30. Rc7 Bb8 31. Rc5 Bd6 32.
Rxa5 Rc8

33. Kg2 Rc2 34. a3 Ra2 35. Nb4 Bxb4 36. axb4 Nd5 37. b5 Raxa4 38.
Rxa4 Rxa4 39. Bxd5 exd5 40. b6 Ra8 41. b7 Rb8 42. Kf3 d4 43.

Ke4 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.27”]

[Round “3”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14.
Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h6 16. Ke2 Bd6 17. h5 Bh7 18. a5 Ke7 19. Na4 f6 20. b4 Rgc8
21. Bc5 Bxc5 22. bxc5 Rc7

23. Nb6 Rd8 24. Nxd7 Rdxd7 25. Bd3 Bg8 26. c6 Rd6
27. cxb7 Rxb7 28. Rc3 Bf7 29. Ke3 Be8 30. g4 e5 31. Rhc1 Bd7 32. Rc5 Bb5
33.

Bxb5 axb5 34. Rb1 b4 35. Rb3 Ra6 36. Kd3 Rba7 37. Rxb4 Rxa5 38. Rxa5
Rxa5 39. Rb7+ Kf8 40. Ke2 Ra2+ 41. Ke3 Ra3+ 42. Kf2 Ra2+

43. Ke3 Ra3+ 44.
Kf2 Ra2+ 45. Ke3 Ra3+ 46. Kf2 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.28”]

[Round “4”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 a5 7. Qc2 Bxd2+
8. Qxd2 c6 9. a4 b5 10. Na3 Bd7 11. Ne5 Nd5 12. e4

Nb4 13. O-O O-O 14. Rfd1
Be8 15. d5 Qd6 16. Ng4 Qc5 17. Ne3 N8a6 18. dxc6 bxa4 19. Naxc4 Bxc6 20.
Rac1 h6 21. Nd6 Qa7 22. Ng4

Rad8 23. Nxh6+ gxh6 24. Qxh6 f6 25. e5 Bxg2 26.
exf6 Rxd6 27. Rxd6 Be4 28. Rxe6 Nd3 29. Rc2 Qh7 30. f7+ Qxf7 31. Rxe4 Qf5
32.

Re7 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.04.30”]

[Round “5”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14.
Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h5 16. Ne2 Bd6 17. Be3 Ne5 18. Nf4 Rc8 19. Bb3 Rxc1+ 20.
Bxc1 Ke7 21. Ke2 Rc8 22. Bd2

f6 23. Nxg6+ Nxg6 24. g3 Ne5 25. f4 Nc6 26.
Bc3 Bb4 27. Bxb4+ Nxb4 28. Rd1 Nc6 29. Rd2 g5 30. Kf2 g4 31. Rc2 Rd8 32.
Ke3 Rd6

33. Rc5 Nb4 34. Rc7+ Kd8 35. Rc3 Ke7 36. e5 Rd7 37. exf6+ Kxf6 38.
Ke2 Nc6 39. Ke1 Nd4 40. Bd1 a5 41. Rc5 Nf5 42. Rc3 Nd4 43.

Rc5 Nf5 44. Rc3
1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.01”]

[Round “6”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8.
Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12.

Nd3 Ba7 13. Qa4 Nc6 14.
Rac1 e5 15. Bxc6 b5 16. Qc2 Qxc6 17. Ncxe5 Qe4 18. Qc6 Bb7 19. Qxe4 Bxe4
20. Rc2 Rfe8 21. Rfc1 f6 22.

Nd7 Bf5 23. N7c5 Bb6 24. Nb7 Bd7 25. Nf4 Rab8
26. Nd6 Re5 27. Nc8 Ba5 28. Nd3 Re8 29. Na7 Bb6 30. Nc6 Rb7 31. Ncb4 a5 32.
Nd5

a4 33. Nxb6 Rxb6 34. Nc5 Bf5 35. Rd2 Rc6 36. b4 axb3 37. axb3 b4 38.
Rxd4 Rxe2 39. Rxb4 Bh3 40. Rbc4 Rd6 41. Re4 Rb2 42. Ree1

Rdd2 43. Ne4 Rd4
44. Nc5 Rdd2 45. Ne4 Rd3 46. Rb1 Rdxb3 47. Nd2 Rb4 48. f3 g5 49. Rxb2 Rxb2
50. Rd1 Kf7 51. Kf2 h5 52. Ke3 Rc2

53. Ra1 Kg6 54. Ra6 Bf5 55. Rd6 Rc3+ 56.
Kf2 Rc2 57. Ke3 Rc3+ 58. Kf2 Rc2 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.03”]

[Round “7”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E10”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8.
Bf4 dxc4 9. Ne5 b5 10. Nxc6 Nxc6 11. Bxc6 Bd7 12.

Bxa8 Qxa8 13. f3 Nd5 14.
Bd2 e5 15. e4 Bh3 16. exd5 Bxf1 17. Qxf1 exd4 18. a4 Qxd5 19. axb5 Qxb5 20.
Rxa7 Re8 21. Kh1 Bf8 22.

Rc7 d3 23. Bc3 Bd6 24. Ra7 h6 25. Nd2 Bb4 26. Ra1
Bxc3 27. bxc3 Re2 28. Rd1 Qa4 29. Ne4 Qc2 30. Rc1 Rxh2+ 31. Kg1 Rg2+ 32.
Qxg2

Qxc1+ 33. Qf1 Qe3+ 34. Qf2 Qc1+ 35. Qf1 Qe3+ 36. Kg2 f5 37. Nf2 Kh7
38. Qb1 Qe6 39. Qb5 g5 40. g4 fxg4 41. fxg4 Kg6 42. Qb7 d2

43. Qb1+ Kg7 44.
Kf1 Qe7 45. Kg2 Qe6 46. Qd1 Qe3 47. Qf3 Qe6 48. Qb7+ Kg6 49. Qb1+ Kg7 50.
Qd1 Qe3 51. Qc2 Qe2 52. Qa4 Kg8 53.

Qd7 Kf8 54. Qd5 Kg7 55. Kg3 Qe3+ 56.
Qf3 Qe5+ 57. Kg2 Qe6 58. Qd1 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.04”]

[Round “8”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1-0”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D17”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4
Bg6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12.

Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 Rc8 14.
Bb5 a6 15. Bxd7+ Kxd7 16. Ke2 f6 17. Rhd1 Ke8 18. a5 Be7 19. Bb6 Rf8 20.
Rac1 f5 21. e5 Bg5 22. Be3

f4 23. Ne4 Rxc1 24. Nd6+ Kd7 25. Bxc1 Kc6 26.
Bd2 Be7 27. Rc1+ Kd7 28. Bc3 Bxd6 29. Rd1 Bf5 30. h4 g6 31. Rxd6+ Kc8 32.
Bd2 Rd8

33. Bxf4 Rxd6 34. exd6 Kd7 35. Ke3 Bc2 36. Kd4 Ke8 37. Ke5 Kf7 38.
Be3 Ba4 39. Kf4 Bb5 40. Bc5 Kf6 41. Bd4+ Kf7 42. Kg5 Bc6

43. Kh6 Kg8 44. h5
Be8 45. Kg5 Kf7 46. Kh6 Kg8 47. Bc5 gxh5 48. Kg5 Kg7 49. Bd4+ Kf7 50. Be5
h4 51. Kxh4 Kg6 52. Kg4 Bb5 53.

Kf4 Kf7 54. Kg5 Bc6 55. Kh6 Kg8 56. g4 1-0
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.06”]

[Round “9”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “E53”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O cxd4 8.
exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 b6 10. Bg5 Bb7 11. Re1 Nbd7 12.

Rc1 Rc8 13. Bd3 Re8 14.
Qe2 Bxc3 15. bxc3 Qc7 16. Bh4 Nh5 17. Ng5 g6 18. Nh3 e5 19. f3 Qd6 20. Bf2
exd4 21. Qxe8+ Rxe8 22.

Rxe8+ Nf8 23. cxd4 Nf6 24. Ree1 Ne6 25. Bc4 Bd5 26.
Bg3 Qb4 27. Be5 Nd7 28. a3 Qa4 29. Bxd5 Nxe5 30. Bxe6 Qxd4+ 31. Kh1 fxe6
32. Ng5 Qd6 33. Ne4 Qxa3 34. Rc3 Qb2 35. h4 b5 36. Rc8+ Kg7 37. Rc7+ Kf8
38. Ng5 Ke8 39. Rxh7 Qc3 40. Rh8+ Kd7 41. Rh7+ Kc6

42. Re4 b4 43. Nxe6 Kb6
44. Nf4 Qa1+ 45. Kh2 a5 46. h5 gxh5 47. Rxh5 Nc6 48. Nd5+ Kb7 49. Rh7+ Ka6
50. Re6 Kb5 51. Rh5 Nd4 52.

Nb6+ Ka6 53. Rd6 Kb7 54. Nc4 Nxf3+ 55. gxf3
Qa2+ 56. Nd2 Kc7 57. Rhd5 b3 58. Rd7+ Kc8 59. Rd8+ Kc7 60. R8d7+ Kc8 61.
Rg7 a4 62.

Rc5+ Kb8 63. Rd5 Kc8 64. Kg3 Qa1 65. Rg4 b2 66. Rc4+ Kb7 67. Kf2
b1=Q 68. Nxb1 Qxb1 69. Rdd4 Qa2+ 70. Kg3 a3 71. Rc3 Qa1 72.

Rb4+ Ka6 73.
Ra4+ Kb5 74. Rcxa3 Qg1+ 75. Kf4 Qc1+ 76. Kf5 Qc5+ 77. Ke4 Qc2+ 78. Ke3 Qc1+
79. Kf2 Qd2+ 80. Kg3 Qe1+ 81. Kf4 Qc1+

82. Kg3 Qg1+ 83. Kf4 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.07”]

[Round “10”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D86”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5
8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O b6 11. Qd2 Bb7 12.

Rac1 Rc8 13. Rfd1 cxd4 14.
cxd4 Qd6 15. d5 Na5 16. Bb5 Rxc1 17. Rxc1 Rc8 18. h3 Rxc1+ 19. Qxc1 e6 20.
Nf4 exd5 21. Nxd5 f5 22.

f3 fxe4 23. fxe4 Qe5 24. Bd3 Nc6 25. Ba6 Nd4 26.
Qc4 Bxd5 27. Qxd5+ Qxd5 28. exd5 Be5 29. Kf2 Kf7 30. Bg5 Nf5 31. g4 Nd6 32.
Kf3 Ne8 33. Bc1 Nc7 34. Bd3 Bd6 35. Ke4 b5 36. Kd4 a6 37. Be2 Ke7 38. Bg5+
Kd7 39. Bd2 Bg3 40. g5 Bf2+ 41. Ke5 Bg3+ 42. Ke4

Ne8 43. Bg4+ Ke7 44. Be6
Nd6+ 45. Kf3 Nc4 46. Bc1 Bd6 47. Ke4 a5 48. Bg4 Ba3 49. Bxa3+ Nxa3 50. Ke5
Nc4+ 51. Kd4 Kd6 52. Be2

Na3 53. h4 Nc2+ 54. Kc3 Nb4 55. Bxb5 Nxa2+ 56. Kb3
Nb4 57. Be2 Nxd5 58. h5 Nf4 59. hxg6 hxg6 60. Bc4 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.09”]

[Round “11”]

[White “Anand,V”]

[Black “Topalov,V”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[WhiteElo “2787”]

[BlackElo “2805”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “A29”]

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7
8. a3 O-O 9. b4 Be6 10. d3 f6 11. Ne4 Qe8 12. Nc5

Bxc5 13. bxc5 Nd5 14. Bb2
Rd8 15. Qc2 Nde7 16. Rab1 Ba2 17. Rbc1 Qf7 18. Bc3 Rd7 19. Qb2 Rb8 20. Rfd1
Be6 21. Rd2 h6 22. Qb1

Nd5 23. Rb2 b6 24. cxb6 cxb6 25. Bd2 Rd6 26. Rbc2
Qd7 27. h4 Rd8 28. Qb5 Nde7 29. Qb2 Bd5 30. Bb4 Nxb4 31. axb4 Rc6 32. b5
Rxc2

33. Rxc2 Be6 34. d4 e4 35. Nd2 Qxd4 36. Nxe4 Qxb2 37. Rxb2 Kf7 38. e3
g5 39. hxg5 hxg5 40. f4 gxf4 41. exf4 Rd4 42. Kf2 Nf5

43. Bf3 Bd5 44. Nd2
Bxf3 45. Nxf3 Ra4 46. g4 Nd6 47. Kg3 Ne4+ 48. Kh4 Nd6 49. Rd2 Nxb5 50. f5
Re4 51. Kh5 Re3 52. Nh4 Nc3 53.

Rd7+ Re7 54. Rd3 Ne4 55. Ng6 Nc5 56. Ra3
Rd7 57. Re3 Kg7 58. g5 b5 59. Nf4 b4 60. g6 b3 61. Rc3 Rd4 62. Rxc5 Rxf4
63. Rc7+ Kg8

64. Rb7 Rf3 65. Rb8+ Kg7 1/2-1/2
[Event “World Chess Championship 2010”]

[Site “Sofia BUL”]

[Date “2010.05.11”]

[Round “12”]

[White “Topalov,V”]

[Black “Anand,V”]

[Result “0-1”]

[WhiteElo “2805”]

[BlackElo “2787”]

[EventDate “2010.04.24”]

[ECO “D56”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 Ne4 8.
Bxe7 Qxe7 9. Rc1 c6 10. Be2 Nxc3 11. Rxc3 dxc4 12.

Bxc4 Nd7 13. O-O b6 14.
Bd3 c5 15. Be4 Rb8 16. Qc2 Nf6 17. dxc5 Nxe4 18. Qxe4 bxc5 19. Qc2 Bb7 20.
Nd2 Rfd8 21. f3 Ba6 22. Rf2

Rd7 23. g3 Rbd8 24. Kg2 Bd3 25. Qc1 Ba6 26. Ra3
Bb7 27. Nb3 Rc7 28. Na5 Ba8 29. Nc4 e5 30. e4 f5 31. exf5 e4 32. fxe4 Qxe4+
33.

Kh3 Rd4 34. Ne3 Qe8 35. g4 h5 36. Kh4 g5+ 37. fxg6 Qxg6 38. Qf1 Rxg4+
39. Kh3 Re7 40. Rf8+ Kg7 41. Nf5+ Kh7 42. Rg3 Rxg3+ 43.

hxg3 Qg4+ 44. Kh2
Re2+ 45. Kg1 Rg2+ 46. Qxg2 Bxg2 47. Kxg2 Qe2+ 48. Kh3 c4 49. a4 a5 50. Rf6
Kg8 51. Nh6+ Kg7 52. Rb6 Qe4 53.

Kh2 Kh7 54. Rd6 Qe5 55. Nf7 Qxb2+ 56. Kh3
Qg7 0-1

Report on the 2010 Corus Chess Tournament

January 25, 2010

In round 6 of the 2010 Corus Chess Tournament, Alexei Shirov was forced to settle for a draw against Nigel Short. Shirov’s remarkable win streak came to a soft ending. Short remarked to reporters, “I stopped the unstoppable machine!”

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.22”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Shirov”]
[Black “Short”]
[ECO “C96”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 O-O 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2 c5 11.d4 Nd7 12.Nbd2 exd4 13.cxd4 Re8 14.b3 Nc6 15.Bb2 cxd4 16.Nxd4 Nxd4 17.Bxd4 Bb7 18.a4 Bf6 19.Nf3 bxa4 20.Rxa4 Rc8 21.Bd3 Nc5 22.Bxc5 Rxc5 23.Bxa6 Bc6 24.Rc4 Rxc4 25.Bxc4 Rxe4 26.Rxe4 Bxe4 27.Bd5 Bxf3 28.Qxf3 Qe7 29.g3 g6 30.b4 Bd4 31.Kg2  1/2-1/2

In Round 7, Shirov was shocked by a loss at the hands of Nakamura. Nakamura raised hopes in his fans that an American could win the Corus Chess Tournament.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.23”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “7”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Nakamura”]
[Black “Shirov”]
[ECO “B33”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 9.Na3 f5 10.Nc4 Nd4 11.exf5 Bxf5 12.Ne3 Bg6 13.Ncd5 Bh6 14.c3 Ne6 15.Bd3 Bxe3 16.Nxe3 Qb6 17.O-O Nf4 18.Be2 Rg8 19.Bf3 Nh3+ 20.Kh1 Nxf2+ 21.Rxf2 Qxe3 22.Bxb7 Rb8 23.Re2 Qb6 24.Bd5 Rg7 25.Qd2 f5 26.Rf1 Kd7 27.b4 f4 28.a4 a5 29.b5 Rd8 30.g3 fxg3 31.hxg3 Kc8 32.c4 Kb8 33.Rf6 Re7 34.Kh2 e4 35.Qc3 Rc8 36.Re3 Ka7 37.Bc6 Rd8 38.c5 dxc5 39.Bxe4 Rd6 40.Rxd6 Qxd6 41.Qxa5+  1-0

In Round 8, Nakamura had a major set back. Loosing to Kramnik forced him to fall two places in the standings and caused many supporters to give up on the hope that he could actually win the Corus Chess Tournament. I should not have to remind all the fair weather fans that it is perfectly acceptable for Nakamura to take a loss with the black pieces against a player as strong as Kramnik. Nakamura’s day will come and it still could happen this January.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.24”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “8”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Nakamura”]
[ECO “A88”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.c4 Bg7 5.Nc3 O-O 6.Nf3 d6 7.O-O c6 8.Rb1 Ne4 9.Qc2 Nxc3 10.bxc3 e5 11.Rd1 e4 12.Ng5 h6 13.Nh3 g5 14.f3 d5 15.Nf2 Kh8 16.cxd5 cxd5 17.c4 e3 18.Nd3 Nc6 19.Bxe3 Nxd4 20.Bxd4 Bxd4+ 21.Kh1 f4 22.Rb5 Qf6 23.Rxd5 Be6 24.Nxf4 gxf4 25.R5xd4 fxg3 26.hxg3 Rg8 27.Rf4 Qg5 28.Rh4 Rg6 29.Qc3+ Kh7 30.f4 Qxg3 31.Qxg3 Rxg3 32.Bxb7 Rb8 33.Be4+ Kg7 34.Kh2 Re3 35.Rg1+ Kf7 36.Bg6+ Ke7 37.Bd3 Rb2 38.Rg2 Rxa2 39.Rxh6 Bf7 40.Rh7 Kf6 41.c5 Ra4 42.c6 Rxf4 43.c7 Re8 44.Rxf7+  1-0

Here are the current standings of the Corus 2010 Chess Tournament:

1.    A. Shirov    6
2.    M. Carlsen
V. Kramnik    5½
4.    H. Nakamura    5
5.    S. Karjakin
L. Dominguez
P. Leko
V. Ivanchuk    4½
9.    V. Anand    4
10.    F. Caruana    3½
11.    S. Tiviakov
N. Short    2½
13.    L. van Wely    2
14.    J. Smeets    1½

2009 Tal Memorial: Round 6

November 11, 2009

Today Kramnik  was able to win his game multiple times do to inaccurate play on both his and Ponomariov’s part.  I am in shock that the same Kramnik that missed 19.Qxh7+ played such a precise endgame.  Thanks to Ponomariov, Kramnik was able to pull ahead of Anand and is now in first place all by himself.

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “0:10:33-0:08:33”]
[Date “2009.11.11”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “V Kramnik”]
[Black “R Ponomariov”]
[ECO “D38”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]

1.d4 e6{Nots by Chris Torres} 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.e3 c5 8.dxc5{Kramnik elects not to develop his bishop to e2,d3 or b5 and instead plays a sharp variation that leaves his King in the middle of the board.} Qa5 9.Rc1 Ne4 10.Qxd5 Nxc3 11.bxc3 Bxc3+ 12.Kd1 O-O 13.Bc4 Nf6 14.Bxf6 Bxf6 15.Ke2 b5{I think this is a mistake. Perhaps Ponomariov could have played: 15…Be6 16.Qe4 Rae8 17.Rhd1 Bh3 18.Qxb7 Bxg2 19.Qd7 Rb8 20.Bb3 Rbd8 21.Qa4 Qc7 22.Rxd8 Rxd8 with equal chances} 16.c6 Ba6 17.Qf5 Qa3{This is a serious mistake. Ponomariov shpould have played:17…Bb2 18.Rc2 g6 19.Qc5 Ba3 20.Qg5 Be7 21.Qe5 Bd6 and the players are dead even.}  18.Bd3 Rfd8 19.c7{I can’t beleive Kramnik missed 19.Qxh7+ Kf8 20.c7Qxa2 21.Kf1. Its is always very interesting to see the mind of a chess genius play tricks on itself.} Qxa2+ 20.Nd2 Rxd3{Ponomariov is right back in the game thanks to Kramnik’s mistake on move 19.} 21.Qxd3 b4 22.Kf3 Bb7+{This is not accurate. Ponomariov should have played 22…Qa5 23.Qd6 Bb7 24.Ke2 Ba6 25.Ke1 Rc8 26.f3 Be5} 23.Kg3 h5 24.h3{f4 would be better. Play could continue 24…Rc8 25.Rhd1 Qe6 26.Rhd1 Bc6 27.Qc4 Rxc7 28.Qxb4 Qg4 with Kramnik clearly superior.} Qa5 25.f4 Rc8 26.Nc4 Qa6 27.Ne5 Qxd3 28.Nxd3 Bc3 29.Rhd1 a5 30.Nc5 Rxc7 31.Na4 Be4 32.Rd6{Kramnik makes a huge mistake. Luckily Ponomariov does not punish him with 32…Bc2! 33.Nxc3 Rxc3 34.Rb6 Rc4 35.Rb8 Kh7 36.Rb5 a4 37.Rxb4 Rxb4 38.Rxc2 a3 39.Ra2 Rb3 40.e5 Rxe3 41.Kf4 Rb3 42.Ke5 Kh6 43.h4 g6 44.fxg6 Kxg6 45.Kd4 Kf6 46.Kc4 Re3} Kh7{Missed the opportunity for 32…Bc2! see previous note} 33.Ra6 h4+ 34.Kh2 Rd7 35.Nc5 Re7 36.Rxa5 Bd2 37.Rc4 f5{This is a horrible mistake. It must be Kramnik’s lucky day! Play should have continued with 37…b3 38.Nxb3 Bxa5 39.Nxa5 Re6 40.Rd4 f5.} 38.Nxe4 fxe4 39.Rh5+ Kg6 40.Rg5+ Kf6 41.Rc6+ Kf7 42.Rf5+ Kg8 43.g4 Re8 44.Re5 Rb8 45.g5 Kh7 46.Re7 Bxe3 47.Rh6+ Kg8 48.Rg6 Bd4 49.Rge6 Kh7{It really is Kramnik’s lucky day. Ponomariov should have played 49…Bc5 and now Kramnik will punish him.} 50.f5 Bc5 51.Re8 Rxe8 52.Rxe8 b3 53.Kg2 Be3 54.Rxe4{The moves that follow are beautiful to watch. Even god using Deep Rybka would not have had a chance. I love the final position. Zugzwang anyone?}  Bxg5 55.Rb4 g6 56.Rb7+ Kh6 57.fxg6 Kxg6 58.Kf3 Bd2 59.Kg4 Be1 60.Rxb3 Bg3 61.Rf3 Be1 62.Re3 Bf2 63.Re6+ Kf7 64.Kf5 Bg3 65.Re4 Bf2 66.Kg5 Bg3 67.Re2 Kg7 68.Re7+ Kf8 69.Kf6 Bf2 70.Re6 Bg3 71.Kg6 Bh2 72.Re4 Bg3 73.Kf6 Bf2 74.Kg6 Bg3 75.Re2 Bd6 76.Kg5 Bg3 77.Kf6 Bf4 78.Re4 Bd6 79.Rd4 Bc7 80.Kg6 Bg3 81.Re4  1-0

(Table below aquired from http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/tal-memorial-2009)

Tal Memorial Moscow (RUS), 5-14 xi 2009 cat. XXI (2764)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
1. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2772 * ½ ½ . ½ . 1 1 . 1 2958
2. Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2788 ½ * . ½ ½ . ½ . 1 1 4 2884
3. Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2758 ½ . * . ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ . 2823
4. Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2739 . ½ . * ½ . ½ 1 ½ ½ 2821
5. Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2801 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ . ½ . . 3 2765
6. Aronian, Levon g ARM 2786 . . 0 . ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 3 2759
7. Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 2739 0 ½ ½ ½ . ½ * . . ½ 2709
8. Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2750 0 . ½ 0 ½ ½ . * ½ . 2 2643
9. Leko, Peter g HUN 2752 . 0 ½ ½ . 0 . ½ * ½ 2 2637
10. Svidler, Peter g RUS 2754 0 0 . ½ . ½ ½ . ½ * 2 2637

Anand-Kramnik: Game 6 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

October 22, 2008

The championship chess board in Bonn has become a form of torture for Vladimir Kramnik. After loosing game 6, Kramnik has just six games left and is down three full points. A loosing streak against a world champion is very hard to fix. In Kramnik’s case, achieving a win against Anand must seem like a desperate dream of freedom for a convict walking the “green mile.”

Below are my comments for game 6: 

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:52:33-0:51:33”]
[Date “2008.10.21”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Anand”]
[Black “Kramnik”]
[ECO “E34”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.cxd5 Qxd5 6.Nf3 Qf5 7.Qb3 Nc6 8.Bd2
O-O 9.h3 b6 10.g4 Qa5 11.Rc1 Bb7 12.a3 Bxc3 13.Bxc3 Qd5 14.Qxd5 Nxd5
15.Bd2 Nf6 16.Rg1 Rac8 17.Bg2 Ne7 18.Bb4 c5 19.dxc5 Rfd8 20.Ne5 Bxg2
21.Rxg2 bxc5 22.Rxc5 Ne4 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Nd3 Nd5 25.Bd2 Rc2 26.Bc1 f5
27.Kd1 Rc8 28.f3 Nd6 29.Ke1 a5 30.e3 e5 31.gxf5 e4 32.fxe4 Nxe4 33.Bd2 a4
34.Nf2 Nd6 35.Rg4 Nc4 36.e4 Nf6 37.Rg3 Nxb2 38.e5 Nd5 39.f6 Kf7 40.Ne4
Nc4 41.fxg7 Kg8 42.Rd3 Ndb6 43.Bh6 Nxe5 44.Nf6+ Kf7 45.Rc3 Rxc3
46.g8=Q+ Kxf6 47.Bg7+  1-0
3…Bb4 Kramnik employs the Nimzo-Indian again.

4. Qc2 Anand chooses the most popular reply.

9. h3 Here we go again. Another novelty from Anand. This seemingly innocent pawn move is the predecessor for a pawn thrust to g4.

10. g4 Anand takes the risky route by starting a kingside attack with the intention of  castling the long way.

11. Rc1 Anand plays the best move and threatens playing a3.

11…Bb7 Kramnik avoids Anand’s double discovered threats.

15…Nf6 A preventative move stopping Anand from playing e4. However, Kramnik should have  tried 15… Rfd8 16.Bg2 Na5 17.Bxa5 Nf4…

17…Ne7 Kramnik moves his knight so that it will not be pinned.

18. Bb4 Anand directs his bishop stop Kramnik from playing c5.

18…c5 Kramnik decides to play aggressively and push the pawn anyway.

20. Ne5 Anand is showing his world champion form.

21…bxc5 Kramnik not so much(see previous note.) This is an unfortunate mistake by the  Russian. Better was Nc6 22.Nxc6 Rxc6 23.Rg3 Rdc8 24.Rd3 Nd5.

22. Rxc5 Anand punishes inaccuracy by profiting a pawn.

24. Nd3 Obviously Anand is not going to play 24.Bxe7 Rc1 mate!

25…Rc2 A strong move but if Anand can activate his rook he will win.

26. Bc1 Anand plans on moving his king to d1.

29. Ke1. This move is very hard to understand. Possible improvements are the natural 29.Rg1  and 29.e3 Nc4 30.Re2 Rd8.

30…e5 Kramnik missed the strategic 30…a4. Unfortunately he spots this move at the wrong  time.

33…a4 This is a terrible mistake that Anand quickly punishes. Better would have been  33…Re8.

35. Rg4 Anand plays the second best move. The strongest continuation was 35.e4 Re8 36.Kf1  Nxe4 37.Bh6.

41. fxg7 Anand would have had an easier time if he had played 41.Rxg7+ Ke6 42.f7. However,  all roads lead to Rome for Anand.

 

Kramnik is Bewildered.

Kramnik is Bewildered.

Kramnik has, for all intensive purposes, lost this match. Perhaps, only now can he start playing  great chess as Spassky did against Fischer once the pressure had been lifted from the Russian’s shoulders.

Anand-Kramnik: Game 5 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

October 21, 2008
Aruna and Viswanathan Anand

Aruna and Viswanathan Anand

Kramnik must be feeling miserable. Anand has beaten him with the black pieces once again. Now down two full points with 7 games to go, Kramnik must take considerable risks if he is to have any chance at becoming world champion again. Taking these risks could easily backfire and have the effect of causing this match to become a total blow-out. Below is game 5 of the 2008 World Chess Championship with my analysis:

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:12:33-0:45:33”]
[Date “2008.10.20”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “5”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Anand”]
[ECO “D49”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6 13.O-O Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Rg8 16.Bf4 Bd6 17.Bg3 f5 18.Rfc1 f4 19.Bh4 Be7 20.a4 Bxh4 21.Nxh4 Ke7 22.Ra3 Rac8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Ra1 Qc5 25.Qg4 Qe5 26.Nf3 Qf6 27.Re1 Rc5 28.b4 Rc3 29.Nxd4 Qxd4 30.Rd1 Nf6 31.Rxd4 Nxg4 32.Rd7+ Kf6 33.Rxb7 Rc1+ 34.Bf1 Ne3 35.fxe3 fxe3  0-1

15…Rg8 This is where Anand deviates from game three. In game three Anand played 15…Bd6 and 16…Rg8. In game five he reverses the order.

17. Bg3 Had kramnik played 17.Bxd6 Qxd6 18.Rfd1 e5 19.Rxd4 Qxd4 20.Nxd4 Bxg2 and Anand would  have been able to repeat the position for a draw.

18. Rfc1 Kramnik had several interesting alternatives including my choice of 18.Nxd4 f4     19.Nxe6 fxe6 20.Qxe6+ Kf8 21.Qf5+. 

18…f4 This is the reason why Anand played f5.

22. Ra3 Kramnik misses the critical 22.Bxd7 Kxd7 23.b4.

27. Re1 Kramnik’s other choices of Rd1 and b4 deserve a second look. 27.Nxd4 Qxd4 28.Rd1 Nf6  29.Rxd4 Nxg4 30.Rd7+ Kf8 31.Rxb7 Rc1+ 32.Bf1 does not need explanation.

29…Nxd4 Kramnik blunders and looses the game. 29.Nd2 d3 30.a5 Rс2 31.Bxd7 would have been  preferable. Kramnik’s chances of winning the World Championship may have just evaporated.

Anand Kramnik 2008: A Special Report Looking Back at the World Chess Championship 1858

October 20, 2008

Paul Morphy in 1858“Morphy…I think everyone agrees…was probably the greatest of them all.” (Bobby Fischer)

This years chess match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik takes place 150 years after one of the greatest world championship matches in history. In 1858, the two best chess players in the world, Paul Morphy and Adolph Anderssen, battled in Paris to determine which player was the greatest. When Morphy arrived in Paris to play Anderssen, he was stricken with a severe flu. His medical treatment was typical for the time period and included being leeched and drained of four pints of blood. Paul Morphy was so weak that he played the match from his hotel bed. Despite the disadvantage of playing while ill, Morphy won the match with a 7-2 score. Many chess writers refuse to admit that Morphy was the world champion. The logic these writers use to deny the fact is rooted in their attitude of European supremacy and is easily refuted by  chess historians. Below are the games from the match. If you are an improving chess player who has not seen these chess treasures, you have your homework.

[Event “It Paris”]
[Site “It Paris”]
[Date “1858.??.??”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “?”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Paul Morphy”]
[Black “Adolf Anderssen”]
[ECO “C52”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “144”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.d4 exd4 7.O-O
Nf6 8.e5 d5 9.Bb5 Ne4 10.cxd4 O-O 11.Bxc6 bxc6 12.Qa4 Bb6
13.Qxc6 Bg4 14.Bb2 Bxf3 15.gxf3 Ng5 16.Nd2 Re8 17.Kh1 Nh3
18.f4 Qh4 19.Qxd5 Nxf2+ 20.Kg1 Nd3 21.Bc3 Nxf4 22.Qf3 Nh3+
23.Kh1 Ng5 24.Qg2 Rad8 25.Rg1 h6 26.Raf1 Qh3 27.Qc6 Qd7 28.Qg2
Bxd4 29.Bxd4 Qxd4 30.Nf3 Qd5 31.h4 Ne6 32.Qg4 Qc6 33.Rg2 Rd3
34.Qf5 Red8 35.Qf6 Qd5 36.Qf5 Rd1 37.Rxd1 Qxd1+ 38.Kh2 Rd3
39.Rf2 Re3 40.Nd2 Re2 41.Qxf7+ Kh8 42.Ne4 Rxf2+ 43.Nxf2 Qd5
44.Ng4 Qxa2+ 45.Kg3 Qb3+ 46.Kh2 Qc2+ 47.Kg3 Qc3+ 48.Kh2 Qc6
49.h5 a5 50.Nf6 gxf6 51.Qxf6+ Kg8 52.Qg6+ Kf8 53.Qxh6+ Ke8
54.Qg6+ Kd7 55.h6 Qd5 56.h7 Qxe5+ 57.Kg1 Ng5 58.h8=Q Qxh8
59.Qxg5 Qd4+ 60.Kf1 a4 61.Qf5+ Kc6 62.Qc8 Kb5 63.Ke1 c5
64.Qb7+ Kc4 65.Qf7+ Kc3 66.Qf3+ Qd3 67.Qf6+ Kb3 68.Qb6+ Kc2
69.Qa7 Qc3+ 70.Ke2 a3 71.Qa4+ Kb2 72.Qb5+ Qb3 0-1

[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "02"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "C77"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "88"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.d3 Bc5 6.c3 b5 7.Bc2 d5
8.exd5 Nxd5 9.h3 O-O 10.O-O h6 11.d4 exd4 12.cxd4 Bb6 13.Nc3
Ndb4 14.Bb1 Be6 15.a3 Nd5 16.Ne2 Nf6 17.Be3 Re8 18.Ng3 Bc4
19.Nf5 Bxf1 20.Qxf1 Ne7 21.N3h4 Nxf5 22.Nxf5 Qd7 23.Bxh6 gxh6
24.Qc1 Bxd4 25.Qxh6 Re1+ 26.Kh2 Ne4 27.Bxe4 Rxe4 28.Qg5+ Kf8
29.Qh6+ Ke8 30.Nxd4 Qd6+ 31.Qxd6 cxd6 32.Rd1 Kf8 33.Rd2 Rae8
34.g4 R8e5 35.f3 Re1 36.h4 Rd5 37.Kg3 a5 38.h5 Kg8 39.Kf2 Re8
40.Kg3 Kh7 41.Kf4 Re7 42.Kg3 f6 43.Kf4 Re8 44.Kg3 Re7 1/2-1/2

[Event "Paris"]
[Site "Paris"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "C65"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "41"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d4 Nxd4
5.Nxd4 exd4 6.e5 c6 {A weak move and the cause of all
subsequent embarrassment.} 7.O-O cxb5 8.Bg5 {Much stronger
play then taking the Knight at once.} Be7 {The only correct
reply. If ...h6 White can play either Re1 or exf6 and in each
case win with ease.} 9.exf6 Bxf6 {...gxf6 would have been
equally bad, for White's reply would have been Qxd4, with a
won game.} 10.Re1+ Kf8 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.c3 d5 13.cxd4 Be6
14.Nc3 a6 15.Re5 Rd8 16.Qb3 Qe7 17.Rae1 {Vigorously and ably
followed up.} g5 {Apprehensive of the advance of the f pawn.}
18.Qd1 Qf6 19.R1e3 Rg8 {Losing the game offhand; it was
previously, however, past all recovery.} 20.Rxe6 1-0

[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "04"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "C77"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "102"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.d3 Bc5 6.c3 b5 7.Bc2 d5
8.exd5 Nxd5 9.h3 O-O 10.O-O h6 11.d4 exd4 12.cxd4 Bb6 13.Nc3
Ndb4 14.Bb1 Be6 15.a3 Nd5 16.Be3 Nf6 17.Qd2 Re8 18.Rd1 Bd5
19.Ne5 Qd6 20.Qc2 Nxd4 21.Bxd4 Bxd4 22.Nxd5 Qxe5 23.Nxf6+ Qxf6
24.Qh7+ Kf8 25.Be4 Rad8 26.Kh1 Bxb2 27.Rab1 Rxd1+ 28.Rxd1 Qxf2
29.Qh8+ Ke7 30.Qh7 Be5 31.Bf3 Qg3 32.Kg1 Qg6 33.Qxg6 fxg6
34.Bb7 Rb8 35.Bxa6 c6 36.Kf2 Bd6 37.Rd3 Kd7 38.Ke2 Ra8 39.Bb7
Rxa3 40.Bc8+ Kc7 41.Rd1 Ra2+ 42.Kf3 Bc5 43.Be6 Rf2+ 44.Kg3 Rf6
45.Rd7+ Kb6 46.Bg4 Bd6+ 47.Kh4 c5 48.Bf3 c4 49.Rxg7 Rf4+
50.Bg4 c3 51.g3 Rxg4+ 0-1
[Event "Paris"]
[Site "05"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "107"]

1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.d4 Nxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bf5 6.Nf3 e6 7.Be3
Bb4 8.Qb3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 Be4 10.Nd2 Bc6 11.Bd3 Nbd7 12.Qc2 h6
13.O-O O-O 14.Rae1 b6 15.h3 Qc8 16.Kh2 Kh8 17.Rg1 Rg8 18.g4 g5
19.f4 Qf8 20.Rg3 Rd8 21.Nf3 Bxf3 22.Rxf3 Qd6 23.Kg2 Nh5
24.fxg5 hxg5 25.gxh5 g4 26.hxg4 Rxg4+ 27.Kf1 f5 28.Qf2 Ne5
29.dxe5 Qxd3+ 30.Qe2 Qe4 31.Bf2 Qc6 32.Rd1 Rxd1+ 33.Qxd1 Qxc4+
34.Qd3 Qxa2 35.Rg3 Qc4 36.Qxc4 Rxc4 37.Rg6 Rc6 38.c4 a5 39.Ke2
Rxc4 40.Rxe6 Rc2+ 41.Kf3 a4 42.Rg6 Rc4 43.Rg1 a3 44.e6 a2
45.Ra1 Re4 46.Rxa2 Rxe6 47.Kf4 Rd6 48.Kxf5 Rd5+ 49.Kg4 b5
50.Ra8+ Kh7 51.Ra7 Rd7 52.Bg3 Rg7+ 53.Kh4 Rf7 54.Rxc7 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "06"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "84"]

1.a3 e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2
O-O 8.d4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 e4 10.Nd2 f5 11.f4 g5 12.Bc4 Bxc4 13.Nxc4
gxf4 14.exf4 Qe8 15.O-O Qc6 16.Qb3 Qd5 17.Rb1 b6 18.Qa2 c6
19.Qe2 Nd7 20.Ne3 Qe6 21.c4 Nf6 22.Rb3 Kf7 23.Bb2 Rac8 24.Kh1
Rg8 25.d5 cxd5 26.cxd5 Qd7 27.Nc4 Ke7 28.Bxf6+ Kxf6 29.Qb2+
Kf7 30.Rh3 Rg7 31.Qd4 Kg8 32.Rh6 Bf8 33.d6 Rf7 34.Rh3 Qa4
35.Rc1 Rc5 36.Rg3+ Bg7 37.h3 Kh8 38.Rxg7 Rxg7 39.Rc3 e3
40.Rxe3 Rxc4 41.Qf6 Rc1+ 42.Kh2 Qxf4+ 0-1
[Event "Paris"]
[Site "07"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "49"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} d5 {We consider this mode of evading
an open game as decidedly inferior to either ...e6 or ...c5,
(the French and Sicilian openings) though but some short time
ago it was in high repute, and was even adopted by
Mr. Staunton at the Birmingham meeting.} 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qa5
{...Qd8 is frequently played, but the move in the text is
preferable.} 4.d4 e5 5.dxe5 Qxe5+ 6.Be2 Bb4 7.Nf3 {Sacrificing
a pawn to obtain a more speedy development of his pieces.}
Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Qxc3+ 9.Bd2 Qc5 10.Rb1 Nc6 11.O-O Nf6 12.Bf4 O-O
{Attempting to defend the c pawn would only have led him into
difficulty.} 13.Bxc7 Nd4 14.Qxd4 Qxc7 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Ng5 Rfd8
17.Qb4 Bc8 {There appears to be no other mode of saving the
pawn; for if ...b6, White would have taken the h pawn with the
knight, and won a pawn.} 18.Rfe1 a5 19.Qe7 Qxe7 20.Rxe7 Nd5
{This is an instructive position} 21.Bxh7+ Kh8 22.Rxf7 Nc3
23.Re1 Nxa2 24.Rf4 Ra6 25.Bd3 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "08"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "101"]

1.a3 {Notes by Lowenthal} e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5
5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2 O-O 8.d4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 e4 10.Nd2 f5
11.f4 {Taking means to stop the further advance of the f pawn,
which he evidently apprehended might prove objectionable. The
range of the adverse King's Bishop is also contracted by this
move.} Qh4+ 12.g3 Qh3 13.Bf1 Qh6 14.c4 c6 15.c5 Bc7 16.Bc4 Nd7
17.O-O b5 18.cxb6 axb6 19.Qb3 Rfe8 20.Bb2 b5 21.Bxe6+ Qxe6
22.Qc2 Qd5 23.Rfc1 Ra6 24.a4 Rea8 25.axb5 Qxb5 26.Qc4+ Qxc4
27.Nxc4 Rxa1 28.Bxa1 Nf6 29.Bc3 Ra2 30.Bd2 Nd5 31.Kf1 Bd8
32.Ke1 Be7 33.Rb1 h6 34.Ne5 c5 35.dxc5 Bxc5 36.Rb5 Nxe3 {Very
prettily played.} 37.Rxc5 Ng2+ 38.Ke2 {If Kd1, Black would
equally have pushed on the e Pawn.} e3 39.Nf3 g6 40.Rd5 Kf7
41.Rd6 Kg7 42.h4 exd2 43.Rxd2 Ra4 {This mode of securing the
draw is highly ingenious; his opponent cannot prevent it, play
as he may.} 44.Kf2 Nxf4 45.gxf4 Rxf4 46.Rd4 Rxd4 47.Nxd4 Kf6
48.Ke3 g5 49.h5 Ke5 50.Nf3+ Kf6 51.Nd4 1/2-1/2
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "Paris m"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B44"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "33"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.Nxd4 e6
5.Nb5 d6 {This is better than ...a6; but even now the King's
Bishop is shut in, and the Queen's Pawn rendered weak.} 6.Bf4
{Correctly played, compelling the advance of the e-Pawn, which
leaves the Queen's Pawn weak and unsupported.} e5 7.Be3 f5
{...a6 would have been sounder play, but even then the game
would have been in favor of the first player.} 8.N1c3 {A fine
conception.} f4 {Had Black played ...a6, White's reply would
still have been Nd5, with a winning game.} 9.Nd5 fxe3 10.Nbc7+
Kf7 11.Qf3+ Nf6 12.Bc4 {The attack is now irresistable.} Nd4
13.Nxf6+ d5 {If the Bishop had been interposed, White would
have taken it, checking; and on Knight retaking have played
Nd5 discovering check, and won without difficulty.} 14.Bxd5+
Kg6 {Had the Queen captured the Bishop, White would have taken
with Knight, discovering check, and have remained eventually
with a Pawn ahead and a winning position.} 15.Qh5+ Kxf6
16.fxe3 {Ne8+, seemingly a good move, is only in appearance,
as Black might have taken it when placed there; and on White
taking Queen, have answered with ...Bb4+, obtaining a winning
game.} Nxc2+ 17.Ke2 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "10"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "153"]

1.a3 e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2
O-O 8.O-O Nxc3 9.bxc3 f5 10.d4 e4 11.Nd2 Rf6 12.f4 Rh6 13.g3
Nd7 14.Nc4 Bxc4 15.Bxc4+ Kh8 16.Ra2 Qe7 17.a4 Nf6 18.Qb3 c6
19.Be6 Re8 20.Bc4 Ng4 21.Rg2 Rb8 22.Be2 Nf6 23.c4 b6 24.Bb2
Qf7 25.Qc2 Be7 26.Bc3 Rg8 27.a5 Bd6 28.axb6 axb6 29.Ra1 g5
30.fxg5 Rxg5 31.Ra8+ Rg8 32.Qa4 Rxa8 33.Qxa8+ Qe8 34.Qxe8+
Nxe8 35.c5 Bc7 36.Bc4 Kg7 37.cxb6 Bxb6 38.Rb2 Bc7 39.Rb7 Kf6
40.Bb4 Rg6 41.Bf8 h5 42.Kf2 h4 43.gxh4 Rg4 44.h5 Rh4 45.h6
Rxh2+ 46.Kg1 Rh3 47.Bf1 Rg3+ 48.Kf2 Rg4 49.Bc4 Rh4 50.Bg8 Bd6
51.Bxd6 Nxd6 52.Rd7 Ne8 53.h7 Kg5 54.Re7 Nd6 55.Re6 Nc4
56.Rxc6 Nd2 57.Ke2 Rh2+ 58.Kd1 Nf3 59.Rc7 Kg6 60.d5 f4 61.exf4
e3 62.Re7 e2+ 63.Rxe2 Rh1+ 64.Kc2 Nd4+ 65.Kd2 Nxe2 66.Kxe2 Kg7
67.Ke3 Re1+ 68.Kd4 Rf1 69.Ke5 Re1+ 70.Kf5 Rd1 71.Be6 Rd4
72.Ke5 Rd1 73.f5 Rh1 74.f6+ Kxh7 75.Kd6 Ra1 76.Ke7 Ra7+ 77.Bd7
1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "11"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "C00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "71"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} e6 2.d4 g6 3.Bd3 Bg7 4.Be3 {The
student cannot fail of observing that in almost every French
game Mr. Morphy plays his Bishops to e3 and d3, and they
appear well placed here, and come into efficient action when
called upon. It is a novelty, however, in Chess play, and
will, doubtless, meet with attention at the hands of authors
on the game.} c5 5.c3 cxd4 6.cxd4 Nc6 7.Ne2 Nge7 8.O-O O-O
9.Nbc3 d5 10.e5 f6 11.f4 fxe5 12.fxe5 a6 13.Qd2 Nb4 14.Bg5
Nxd3 15.Qxd3 Bd7 16.Qh3 Qe8 17.Ng3 Rc8 18.Rxf8+ Qxf8 19.Rf1
Qe8 20.Qh4 Nf5 21.Nxf5 gxf5 22.Rf3 {This Rook is now well
posted, and ready for effective co-operation with the rest of
the attacking pieces.} Bb5 23.Rg3 {Rh3 would have been weak,
while by the move in the text White gains an undeniable
advantage in position.} Rc7 24.Bf6 f4 {This, says Mr. Morphy,
appears the only move to ward off the attack, if 24...Kh8
25.Rxg7 Rxg7 26.Nxb5 Qxb5 27.Qh6 Qd7 28.h4 Qf7 29.h5 Qc7 30.a3
Qd7 31.Kf2 Qf7 32.Kf3 Qc7 33.g3 Qd7 34.Qxg7+ Qxg7 35.h6 Qxf6
36.exf6 Kg8 37.Kf4 Kf7 38.Ke5 and must win.}- 25.Qxf4 Qf8
26.Nxb5 axb5 27.Qh6 Kh8 28.Rxg7 Rxg7 29.Kf2 {Contemplating the
exchange of pieces, and the bringing of the King to attack the
isolated Pawns; the game, however, was an easy one to win.}
Kg8 30.Qxg7+ Qxg7 31.Bxg7 Kxg7 32.Kf3 b4 33.g4 b6 34.h4 b5
35.Ke3 b3 36.a3 1-0

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