Posts Tagged ‘Emory Tate chess’

Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior (Special Offer)

August 10, 2017


This is a limited time offer to own or gift a hardbound copy of “Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior.” Dr. Daaim Shabazz and I know Emory had many friends in California who have not yet had an opportunity to add Triple Exclam into their library. Daaim has entrusted me to distribute some of the last remaining copies of this historic work out west. Help us keep Emory’s memory alive and well in California by ordering a copy of his book. In most cases, I will deliver your copy to you personally with a handshake. Additionally, you will be invited to an exclusive book talk the next time Dr. Daaim Shabazz is in California. The price is just $40. Please send questions and orders to Chris Torres, chesslessons@aol.com

Click here to read my review of “Triple Exclam!!! The Life And Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior”

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Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior (review)

August 1, 2017

Triple Exclam!!! The Life and Games of Emory Tate, Chess Warrior

Emory Tate was more than an International Master at chess. He was an icon of African American chess, a poet, a fighter, a father, a wordsmith and an oftentimes misunderstood genius. To many in the chess world, Emory was a boastful stranger and, to a lucky few, a good friend. Emory acquired legions of fans through his brilliant chess moves. Many became fascinated by his enigmatic personality and mysterious past only to discover that it was nearly impossible to separate the myth from the man. This is where the book Triple Exclam!!! shines.

In Triple Exclam!!!, Daaim Shabazz aptly exposes the real Emory Tate by focusing not just on the light and dark, but also everything in between. Through sheer determination, Shabazz does what so many other chess players failed to, he captures the genius that was Emory Tate. In doing so, Triple Exclam!!! makes a solid case that: Emory Tate was a chess player of the highest caliber, and despite the odds being against him, became a legendary American chess figure.

Fans of Tate will love this book. As a close friend of Emory’s, I cherish it. Most importantly, I know Emory Tate would find his portrayal in Triple Exclam!!! to be “most professional.”

For more information on this book please visit:

thechessdrum

En Passant

October 20, 2015

International Master Emory Tate’s funeral is this Saturday the 24th of October at 864 county road 17, banks, Alabama, 36005. The wake is at 11am and funeral at 12pm.
Flowers can be donated at scottchapelhillmortuary.com by clicking on his picture and cards may be mailed at 814 headland Ave Dothan, AL 36303
  

Emory Andrew Tate Jr. (December 27, 1958 – October 17, 2015)

October 18, 2015

Si monumentum requiris, circumspice!

Mate in 4 Challenge from Emory Tate’s Simultaneous Exhibition at MSJE

July 26, 2015

Below is a game from IM Emory Tate’s chess simul at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp. The simul consisted of 30 boards occupied by many of the top scholastic chess players in Northern California. Emory Tate won on every board and completed the task in under 2 and 1/2 hours. I am purposefully leaving the game incomplete to see if my readers can spot the mate in 4 that Emory produced to conclude his game with Luke Zhao.

Emory Tate giving a simul at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

Emory Tate giving a simul at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

 

[Event “Simul at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp”]
[Site “Fremont (California)”]
[Date “2015.2.21”]
[Round “”]
[White “Tate Emory (USA)”]
[Black “Zhao, Luke (USA)”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Eco “C44”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “www.chessmusings.wordpress.com”]
1. e4 e5

2.d4 {It’s a rare and unique pleasure to watch IM Emory Tate play the Danish Gambit!}

2… exd4 3.c3 d5

( 3…dxc3 4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2 Bb4+ 6.Nc3 Nf6 7.Nge2Nxe4 8.O-O Nxc3 9.Nxc3 Bxc3 10.Bxc3 Qg5 11.Re1+ Kd8 12.f4 Qxf4 13.Bxg7 Rg8 14.Qg4 Qd6 15.Bf6+ {1-0, Linden F (GER) – Machussky, Paris 1863})

Position after 3... d5

Position after 3… d5

4.exd5 Qxd5

5.cxd4 Nc6

( 5…Bb4+ 6.Nc3 Nc6 7.Nf3 Nf6 8.Be2 O-O 9.O-O Bxc3 10.bxc3 b6 11.c4 Qd8 12.d5 Ne7 13.Nd4 Bb7 14.Bb2 c6 15.Bf3 cxd5 16.Re1 Re8 17.Qc1 Rb8 18.Qg5 Ng6 19.Nf5 Rxe1+ 20.Rxe1 dxc4 21.Bxb7 Rxb7 22.Bxf6 Qxf6 23.Re8+ Nf8 24.Nh6+ Qxh6 25.Rxf8+ Kxf8 26.Qd8# {1-0, Alekhine Alexander A (RUS) – Freeman, New York 1924})

Position after 5... Nc6.

Position after 5… Nc6

6.Nf3 Bg4

( 6…Nf6 7.Be2 Bb4+ 8.Nc3 Ne4 9.Bd2 ( 9.Qd3 Bf5 )
Bxc3 10.bxc3 O-O 11.O-O Na5 12.Re1 b5 13.Bd3 f5 14.a4 {?!} Nb3
{!} 15.Ra3 bxa4 16.Rxa4 Nbxd2 17.Nxd2 Nxc3 18.Qc2 {!} Qd7 {!}
19.Ra5 {!} Qxd4 {!} ( 19…Nd5 {?} 20.Rxd5 ) ( 19…Ne4 {?} 20.Nxe4
fxe4 21.Bxe4 Rb8 22.Bxh7+ Kh8 23.Rh5 $18 ) 20.Rc1 Rd8 21.Qb3+
Be6 {!!} ( 21…Kh8 {?} 22.Rxc3 $18 ) ( 21…Nd5 {?} 22.Nf3 Qf4
23.Rxd5 {!} Qxc1+ 24.Bf1 Be6 25.Rxd8+ Rxd8 26.Qxe6+ Kh8 27.Ne5
$18 ) 22.Qxe6+ Kh8 23.Re5 Qxd3 24.Rce1 h6 25.Qg6 {?} Qxd2 {0-1, Nyholm Gustaf (SWE) – Alekhine Alexander A (RUS), Stockholm 1912 It})

Position after 6... Bg4

Position after 6… Bg4

 

7.Be2 O-O-O

( 7…Bb4+ 8.Nc3 Bxf3 9.Bxf3 Qc4 10.Bxc6+ Qxc6 11.O-O Ne7 12.Qb3 Bxc3 13.bxc3 O-O 14.c4 Nf5 15.d5 Qg6 16.Bf4 Nd4 17.Qd1 c5 18.Be3 Nf5 19.Qd3 b6 20.Bf4 Rfe8 21.Rfe1 Nd4 22.Qxg6
hxg6 23.Kf1 f6 24.Rxe8+ Rxe8 25.Re1 Kf7 {1/2-1/2, Neumeier Klaus (AUT) 2293 – Svidler Peter (RUS) 2740 , Dortmund 1991 It (open)})

Position after 7... 0-0-0

Position after 7… 0-0-0

8.Nc3 Bb4

9.O-O Bxc3

( 9…Qa5 10.Be3 Nf6 11.Qb3 Rhe8 12.a3 Bxc3 13.bxc3 Nd5 14.Rab1 b6 15.Bb5 Bxf3 16.gxf3 Re6 17.Rbc1 a6 18.Bxc6 Nxe3 19.fxe3 Qg5+ 20.Kh1 Rxc6 21.c4 Re6 22.Rce1 Rde8 23.e4 Qf4 24.Qe3 Qh4 25.Qf2 Qe7 26.c5 bxc5 27.d5 Rb6 28.Rc1 f5 29.Qxc5 Qxc5 30.Rxc5 fxe4 31.fxe4 Rxe4 32.Rf8+ Kd7 33.Rf7+ Re7
34.Rxc7+ Kxc7 35.Rxe7+ Kd6 36.Rxg7 Kxd5 37.Rxh7 Rb3 38.a4 Rb4 39.a5 Rb5 40.Rh6 Ke4 41.Rxa6 Kf3 42.Rf6+ Kg4 43.a6 Ra5 44.Kg1 {1/2-1/2, Lipinski Georg – Matthai Heinz, Kiel 5/22/1965 It (open)})

Position after 9... Bxc3.

Position after 9… Bxc3

10.bxc3 h6 {?} {Luke is spending a tempo he does not have to obstruct white’s progress on the wrong side of the board.}

( 10…Nf6 11.Rb1 Rhe8 12.c4 Qe4 13.Be3 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 Bxe2 15.Qxe2
Rxd4 16.Qb2 Rxc4 17.Bxa7 Re6 18.f3 Qc6 19.Bf2 b6 20.Rbc1 Kb7
21.Bg3 Re2 22.Qa3 Rxa2 23.Qxa2 Rxc1 24.Qxf7 Qc4 25.Qxc4 Rxc4
26.Re1 Nd5 27.h4 b5 28.Re5 Nc3 29.Be1 b4 30.h5 {…0-1, Uzman Cavit 2200 – Shaw Terrey I (AUS) 2390 , Skopje 1972 Olympiad})

( 10…Qd7 11.Rb1 f6 12.Qa4 Qe8 13.d5 Bxf3 14.Ba6 Na5 15.Qxa5
Bxd5 16.Bf4 Rd7 17.Qb5 Qe4 18.f3 Qxf4 19.Bxb7+ Kd8 20.Bxd5 {1-0, Forster Richard (SUI) 2456 – Lehner Oliver (AUT) 2453 , Parana 1991 Ch World (juniors)})

Position after 10... h6

Position after 10… h6

 

11.Rb1 {Emory’s rook is like a cannon pointed at Luke’s king from an adjacent room!}
11… Nf6

12.Be3 Nd7 {?} {Luke reacts to the danger improperly. If his best plan is to defend for dear
life, he might as well do that after Qxa2. At least then, if Luke survives, he has good prospects in the endgame.}

Position after 12... Nd7

Position after 12… Nd7

13.c4 {Emory regains the initiative while maximizing his space and force.}
13… Qh5

14.Rb5 {A more natural choice is Qb3 but Emory Tate is attacking with the creativity he is famous for.}

Position after 14. Rb5

Position after 14. Rb5

14… Qg6 {Luke sets up threats by placing his queen in the same file as Emory’s king. However, the best way to respond to Emory’s creative play would have been to return the favor with:}
( 14…Nde5 {!} 15.Nxe5 Bxe2 )

15.d5 {Now Emory’s pawn center is disrupting Luke’s king safety}
15… Ncb8 {??} {Luke has resigned himself to being target practice for Emory’s tactics. The only way to continue after d5 was Nce5 and even that isn’t pretty for black..}

Position after 15... Ncb8

Position after 15… Ncb8

16.Qb3 {!} {And now the punishment for Luke’s crime.}

16… b6

17.c5 {Emory attacks the only pawn that stands between him and victory.}

Position after 17. c5

Position after 17. c5

17… f5 {Too little too late. When it comes to the Danish Gambit, white doesn’t require
many inaccuracies in order to put black’s back against the ropes.}

18.c6 {Placing the nail into the coffin.}

Position after 18. c6

Position after 18. c6

 

18… Nxc6

19.dxc6 Qxc6

Position after 19... Qxc6

Position after 19… Qxc6

20.Rc1 Qa8

21.Ra5 {!} {Emory offers a rook that black can’t take.}

21… Nb8 ( 21…bxa5 22.Ba6+ Qb7 23.Qxb7# )

Position after 21... Nb8

Position after 21… Nb8

 

22.Bf4 {If you think Bxb6 also works, you are correct.}

22… Rd7

23.Re5 Rhd8

24.Qe6 g5 {And now, Emory spots a fantastic mate in 4 that blew the minds of everyone watching his simul.}

White to move: Mate in 4!

White to move: Mate in 4!

I will post the solution/conclusion of the game in the near future.

 

 

Fremont Summer Chess Camp 2015: Day 14

July 22, 2015

On our fourteenth day of the Fremont Summer Chess Camp, International Master Emory Tate put on a show by winning with ease against 30 of the top young players in California. Every player who participated received Emory’s autograph on their game score and a souvenir photo from the simul. Later in the week, I will post Emory’s remarkable winning combination against Luke Zhao from MSJE. For now, please enjoy some of the images I collected of the legend at work!

simul1simul2

simul3

simul4

For more information on our chess programs, please visit www.ChessAndMusic.com

Memorial Weekend Sales Event for the Fremont Summer Chess Camp

May 18, 2015
Fremont Summer Chess Camp

Fremont Summer Chess Camp

Summer is rapidly approaching and that means it’s almost time for the annual Fremont Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont, California. Our summer chess camp features coaches with decades of chess teaching experience who annually create a summer camp that is fun, competitive and educational.  All camp attendees will receive the best chess training available and take part in USCF rated tournament with awards given at the end of each week. So why not kick your summer off by saving 10% off of tuition and receiving one of several “thank you” gifts just for signing your child up for the chess camp hosted by the school that just won the 2015 USCF National Elementary Chess Championships?

memorial_day_sale

The TCAMA’s Memorial Weekend Sales Event is the best time to register your child for the Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

  • Sign up for one week by May 25th and your child will receive a free private lesson with a TCAMA chess coach prior to the start of the chess camp.
  • Sign up for two weeks of camp and you will also get a copy of Chess Tactics for Champions by our friend Grandmaster Susan Polgar at your child’s free private lesson.
  • Finally, if you sign your child up for three or more weeks of the Fremont Summer Chess Camp, he/she will receive the free lesson, book and a deluxe triple weighted set of tournament chess pieces!

week3six

Of course, it’s really about giving your child the best chess education possible this summer. That is why the TCAMA only uses the best and most proven local chess coaches at our Fremont Summer Chess Camp. This summer, we proudly are offering classes with:

*IM Emory Tate – Weibel Coach

*NM Eric Schiller PhD. – famous chess author

*Francisco Anchondo – Weibel Coach

*Joe LonsdaleHead Coach of the National Champions at MSJE!

*James Paquette – Director of Instruction for the TCAMA

*Tans Hylkema – TCAMA’s early childhood specialist

*Chris Torres – President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

Even better, because all of these chess coaches work full time in the Bay Area, your child can continue to seek guidance from our highly accomplished staff at all of the big scholastic tournaments held in Northern California.

week4one

Join us at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp located at Mission San Jose Elementary School  in Fremont from June 29th through July 23rd. Remember to sign up by May 25th in order to receive a 10% discount and claim a special “thank you gift” for your child. For more details and to register online, please visit www.ChessAndMusic.com and I’ll see you at chess camp.

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy

Coach for the 2015 National Elementary Chess Champions at Mission San Jose Elementary School

 

P.S. Don’t forget to be sociable and share this incredible offer with your friends.

Why is Fabiano Caruana Dominating the Strongest Chess Tournament Ever?

September 4, 2014
Fabiano Caruana dominating performance in the 2014 Sinquefield Cup is made possible by a combination of his rare talent, passion for the game, hard work and experience.

Fabiano Caruana’s dominating performance in the 2014 Sinquefield Cup is made possible by a combination of his rare talent, passion for the game, hard work and experience.

 

Yesterday in chess class, one of my students asked me, “How is it possible for Fabiano Caruana to play chess so well?” I answered her by saying that it is a,”Combination of talent, passion for chess, hard work and experience.” When another child asked me about his experience, I explained that, “It takes learning from thousands of losses to become any good at chess.” I then set up the position below in which Torres Chess and Music Academy coach Emory Tate provides a valuable learning moment to the young Fabiano Caruana.

 

Position from Fabiano Caruana vs Emory Tate. Black to move and win!

Position from Fabiano Caruana vs Emory Tate. Black to move and win!

 

Here is the game in its entirety:

 

[Event “Tournament ‘New York Masters'”]
[Site “New York (USA)”]
[Date “2003”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Caruana Fabiano (ITA)”]
[Black “Tate Emory (USA)”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Eco “B22”]
[Annotator “Chris Torres”]
[Source “Chris’ Portable Treasury of Chess Games”]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c3 d5 4.exd5 exd5 5.d4 c4 {Emory Tate chose a different path in his fine victory over Mechem.}
( 5…Nc6 6.Nbd2 Be6 7.Bd3 c4 8.Bc2 b5 9.Nf1 Bd6 10.Ng3 Nf6 11.Nf5
Bxf5 12.Bxf5 Qe7+ 13.Qe2 Ne4 14.Ng5 Nxg5 15.Bxg5 f6 16.Be3 g6
17.Bc2 O-O 18.Qf3 Qf7 19.O-O b4 20.Bf4 Bxf4 21.Qxf4 bxc3 22.bxc3
Rab8 23.Rab1 Rxb1 24.Rxb1 Qe6 25.Kf1 {…0-1, Mechem P – Tate Emory (USA) 2370 , Illinois 1996 It (open)}
) 6.Be2 ( 6.b3 cxb3 7.axb3 Bd6 8.Bd3 Ne7 9.Nbd2 Bf5 10.Nf1 O-O
11.Ne3 Bxd3 12.Qxd3 Qd7 13.O-O Nbc6 14.Ba3 f5 15.Bxd6 Qxd6 16.c4
f4 17.Ng4 Ng6 18.Rfe1 Rae8 19.h4 Qd7 20.Rxe8 Rxe8 21.h5 Nge7
22.Nge5 dxc4 23.bxc4 Nxe5 24.Nxe5 Qf5 25.Rxa7 Qxh5 {…1-0, Rublevsky Sergei (RUS) 2683 – Simonian Hrair (ARM) 2473 , Warsaw 12/18/2010 Ch Europe (active)}
) Bd6 7.O-O a6 ( 7…Ne7 8.b3 cxb3 9.axb3 Nbc6 10.c4 O-O 11.Nc3
Be6 12.Bg5 Qd7 13.Bh4 Rfe8 14.c5 Bc7 15.Nb5 Bg4 16.Nxc7 Qxc7
17.Bg3 Qd7 18.Ne5 Bxe2 19.Qxe2 Nxe5 20.dxe5 Nc6 21.f4 d4 22.Qc4
Qe6 23.Qxe6 fxe6 24.Rfd1 Red8 25.Ra4 a6 26.Rd3 Rd5 27.b4 {…0-1, Chakurira S (ZIM) 2171 – Lautier Joel (FRA) 2365 , Adelaide 1988 Ch World (juniors) (under 20)}
) 8.Ne5 {+0.07 CAP} ( 8.b3 cxb3 9.axb3 Ne7 ( 9…Nf6 10.Bb5+
{+0.48 CAP} ) 10.Re1 O-O 11.Ba3 Nbc6 12.Bd3 Ng6 13.Bxd6 Qxd6
14.Bxg6 hxg6 15.Ra2 Bf5 16.Rae2 Rac8 17.Re3 a5 18.Nbd2 b5 19.Ne5
b4 20.Nxc6 Rxc6 21.c4 a4 22.c5 Qf6 23.bxa4 Qxd4 24.Nb3 Qxd1 25.Rxd1
Ra8 26.a5 Bc2 27.Rxd5 Re6 {…1/2-1/2, Timmermans Ivo (NED) 2247 – Pavlovic Milos (SRB) 2531 , Vlissingen 8/ 6/2011 It (open)}
) ( 8.Re1 Ne7 9.b3 cxb3 10.axb3 Nbc6 11.Bd3 O-O 12.Ng5 g6 13.h4
h5 14.Nd2 Bg4 15.Qc2 Rc8 16.Qb2 Qd7 17.Ngf3 Nf5 18.c4 Rfe8 19.Ne5
Bxe5 20.dxe5 Nxh4 21.cxd5 Qxd5 22.Ne4 Qxd3 23.Nf6+ Kh8 24.Nxe8
Be6 25.Nd6 Nd4 26.Be3 Ndf3+ 27.Kh1 Nxe1 {…0-1, Flaquer Luis (DOM) 2274 – Stanojoski Zvonko (MKD) 2485 , Khanty Mansyisk 9/23/2010 Olympiad}
) Ne7 {This move deserves more attention and is yet another invention by Emory Tate.}
9.Bf3 Nbc6 10.Re1 O-O 11.b3 cxb3 12.axb3 Be6 13.Bg5 Qc7 14.Bxe7
Nxe7 15.Qd2 Rac8 16.h3 {This move unnecessarily creates weakness around white’s king.}
Ng6 {The only thing Emopry doesn’t like about his position is Fabiano’s knight on e5, so he is fixing that.}
17.Nxg6 hxg6 {Black’s position is now better.} 18.Qg5 {?} {
Fabiano makes a strategic and tactical error. The strategic mistake is
attacking when he is not in a superior position. Emory will show us how to
punish the tactical mistake of placing the queen on g5.} Bf4
{!} {The queen is a dead woman walking.} 19.Qh4 g5 {!} 20.Qh5
g6 21.Qh6 g4 {!} {And that my friends is how it’s done! Once again, Emory Tate uses creativity and precise tactics to bust his opponent.}
0-1

 

Solution: After Emory plays 18...Bf4, Fabiano's queen is a, Dead Woman Walking!"

Solution: After Emory plays 18…Bf4, Fabiano’s queen is a, “Dead Woman Walking!”

Fremont Summer Chess Camp: Week 3

July 18, 2014

The Torres Chess and Music Academy is constantly at work making sure the events we offer your children are the very best in California. Below are some images from week 3 of the 2014 Fremont Summer Chess Camp. There is still one more week left in our chess camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School which will feature instruction from International Master Emory Tate and Grandmaster Susan Polgar.

 

Click here to register for week 4!

 

Our camp is filled with a diverse group of students who all love chess.

Our camp is filled with a diverse group of students who all love chess.

 

 

Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

Joe Lonsdale is a legendary chess coach who brings decades of teaching experience to our camp daily.

 

 

International Master Emory Tate enjoys teaching as much as his students enjoy learning.

International Master Emory Tate enjoys teaching as much as his students enjoy learning.

 

 

The Fremont Summer Chess Camp features a USCF rated chess tournament with prizes so that our star students have an opportunity to shine.

The Fremont Summer Chess Camp features a USCF rated chess tournament with prizes so that our star students have an opportunity to shine.

 

 

When the kids finish their rated games they are treated to personalized analysis from the best minds in the business.

When the kids finish their rated games they are treated to personalized analysis from the best minds in the business.

 

 

Famed chess author Eric Schiller stopped by on Thursday and presented seven of his best chess games to our students.

Famed chess author Eric Schiller stopped by on Thursday and presented seven of his best chess games to our students.

 

 

After his brilliant performance, Eric graciously handed out our weekly awards and signed autographs.

After his brilliant performance, Eric graciously handed out our weekly awards and signed autographs.

 

 

Our Fremont Summer Chess camp even had its own book fair.

Our Fremont Summer Chess camp even had its own book fair.

 

Take a moment to check out my report on weeks 1 and 2.

Fremont Summer Chess Camp: Week 1

 

Fremont Summer Chess Camp: Week 2

Emory Tate Delivers a Legendary Performance at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp

July 13, 2014

International Master Emory Tate stunned the Bay Area’s best young chess players by achieving a perfect score in a massive simultaneous chess exhibition at the Torres Chess and Music Academy’s Fremont Summer Chess Camp.

 

Fremont, California (PRWEB) July 13, 2014

For all those unaware of what a great chess player International Master Emory Tate truly is, the Torres Chess and Music Academy recommends playing through his recent win over Grandmaster Maurice Ashley in just 22 moves! For the children who participated in his simultaneous exhibition chess event on July 10th, Emory has achieved a legendary status.

 

For the children who participated in his simultaneous exhibition chess event on July 10th, Emory Tate has achieved a legendary status.

For the children who participated in his simultaneous exhibition chess event on July 10th, Emory Tate has achieved a legendary status.

 

Nearly 50 opponents, many of whom are some of the top ranked young chess players in the United States, took on the famed International Chess Master simultaneously. Emory Tate, who only had the white pieces in a few of the games, played for 5 hours and a walked nearly 2 miles while completing his simultaneous chess exhibition! During the course of this momentous task, Emory Tate emerged victorious on every single board.

“In sixteen years of running events like these, I have never witnessed this level of chess mastery in one of our simuls. Beyond making it look easy, Emory managed to make every child feel important.” -Chris Torres

 

Beyond making it look easy, Emory Tate managed to make every child feel important.

Beyond making it look easy, Emory Tate managed to make every child feel important.

 

The gentleman behind organizing this event was the very famous chess instructor Chris Torres. Mr. Torres is the founder of the Torres Chess and Music Academy which is very popular with the top scholastic chess players in Northern California. Every child who took part in the main event received one-on-one instruction following their game, an autograph from Emory Tate, a souvenir photograph of Emory at their board and the opportunity to learn from one of the strongest chess masters in the United States.

The Fremont Summer Chess Camp has two more weeks of classes and special events including a lecture from famed chess author Eric Schiller and a visit from Grandmaster Susan Polgar. For more information please visithttp://www.ChessAndMusic.com.

 

original press release: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12014019.htm


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