Posts Tagged ‘fide chess’

An American in Tromso

August 12, 2014

Sam Shankland is sensational in his Chess Olympiad debut.

 

After eight rounds against a difficult international field, Grandmaster Sam Shankland of the United States remains undefeated in Tromso, Norway. Those of us from the United States and especially California couldn’t be prouder of our representative at the 41st Chess Olympiad. Below is my personal favorite from Sam’s play and I invite you to enjoy the game while raising a glass to the United States of America’s newest international chess star.

 

Sam Shankland has a lot to smile about. (photo from: www.fpawn.blogspot.com)

Sam Shankland has a lot to smile about these days. (photo from: http://www.fpawn.blogspot.com)

 

[Event “41’st Chess Olympiad”]

[Site “Tromso, Norway”]

[Date “2014.8.8”]

[Round “6”]

[White “Guillermo Vazquez”]

[Black “Samuel Shankland”]

[Result “0-1”]

[Eco “B12”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

 

{[ CARO-KANN,B12]} 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.h4 {Guillermo Vazquez chooses a very aggressive line as white. The idea is to add to his control on the kingside while creating threats against Shankland’s Bishop on f5. Many amateur players have allowed white to trap their bishop with pawn advances to g4, h5, and f3.}

The position after 4. h4

The position after 4. h4

 

h5 {Of course, there is nothing amateur about GM Sam Shankland’s chess and he chooses the best line to avoid white’s plans.}

5.Bg5 {This early bishop move gives black a nice target on “b7.” Nc3 is a fine alternative here and can be seen in the game below:}

( 5.Nc3 e6 6.Bd3 Bxd3 7.Qxd3 Qb6 8.Bg5 Qa6 9.Qd2 c5 10.Nf3 cxd4

11.Ne2 Nd7 12.O-O Ne7 13.Nexd4 Nc6 14.a4 Nxd4 15.Nxd4 Qb6 16.a5

Qa6 17.c4 Qxc4 18.Rfc1 Qb4 19.Qc2 Nc5 20.a6 Nxa6 21.Rxa6 Qxd4

22.Qc7 Bb4 23.Rxe6+ fxe6 24.Qxg7 Rf8 {…1-0, Zelcic Robert (CRO) 2564  – Bartels Hans A (NED) 2297 , Caorle 1993 It (open)})

Qb6 {Sam Shankland develops with a threat and grabs the initiative. So much for trying to play a peaceful Caro-Kann.}

6.Bd3 {!?} {Guillermo Vazquez is willing to pay the price of a pawn on “b2” or “d4” in order to gain a strong attack. In a sense, he is allowing Sam Shankland to pick his own poison.}

The position after 6. Bd3

The position after 6. Bd3

 

Qxd4 {Sam chooses the pesto rather than the hemlock.}

( 6…Bxd3 {was Alexei Shirov’s choice in a nice victory over Anand.}

7.Qxd3 Qa6 8.Qf3 e6 9.Ne2 c5 10.c3 Nc6 11.Nd2 Nge7 12.Nb3 cxd4

13.cxd4 Nf5 14.O-O Be7 15.Bxe7 Ncxe7 16.g3 b6 17.Nf4 g6 18.Nh3

O-O 19.Qf4 Qe2 20.Rfd1 Rac8 21.Rd2 Qg4 22.Qxg4 hxg4 23.Ng5 a5

24.f3 Rc4 25.Kf2 Rfc8 26.fxg4 {…0-1, Shirov Alexei (ESP) 2713  – Anand Viswanathan (IND) 2817 , Leon  6/ 5/2011 Match “Leon Masters”}) ( 6…Qxb2 7.Bxf5 Qxa1 8.e6 {Is probably what Guillermo Vazquez was hoping for.})

7.Nf3 {Vazquez develops with a threat and is still hoping Shankland plays Qxb2.}

Qg4 {Sam Shankland avoids his opponent’s plans while simultaneously placing the queen in a very dangerous position for white.}

( 7…Qxb2 8.Bxf5 Qxa1 9.e6 Nh6 10.exf7+ Kxf7 11.Bc8 Na6 12.Bh3

e5 13.O-O Bd6 14.Nfd2 Ng4 15.Bxg4 hxg4 16.Qxg4 Nc5 17.Nb3 Qxa2

18.Qf5+ Kg8 19.Nc3 Qa6 20.Nxc5 Bxc5 21.Qe6+ Kh7 22.h5 Qc4 23.h6

Rhg8 24.Qf5+ Kh8 25.Qh3 g6 26.Bf6+ Kh7 27.Qd7+ {…1-0, Kislinsky Alexey (UKR) 2495  – Krutul Piotr (POL) 1854 , Warsaw 12/16/2006 Ch Europe (active)})

The position after 7... Qg4

The position after 7… Qg4

 

 

8.O-O {White’s best move is to castle into danger. Below is fine example of strong play for black had white chosen to play Nc3 instead.}

( 8.Nc3 e6 9.O-O Nd7 10.Bxf5 Qxf5 11.Re1 Be7 12.Nd4 Qg4 13.Qd2

Bc5 14.Nb3 Be7 15.Nd4 Bxg5 16.hxg5 h4 17.f3 Qh5 18.Rad1 Ne7 19.Ne4

O-O 20.Nf2 a6 21.b4 Qh7 22.Ng4 Nf5 23.c4 Rfd8 24.c5 a5 25.bxa5

Nxd4 26.Qxd4 Rxa5 27.Re2 Rxc5 {…0-1, Malykh Yuriy A (RUS) 2140  – Airapetian Gor (RUS) 2451 , Lipetsk  3/28/2010 Ch Region})

Bxd3 {Sam decides to exchange the bishop which lacks scope for his opponent’s most active piece.}

( 8…e6 9.Be2 Qb4 10.c4 Ne7 11.Nc3 dxc4 12.Nd2 b5 13.a4 Nd7 14.axb5 cxb5 15.Nxb5 Nd5 16.Nxc4 Be7 17.Nbd6+ {1-0, Robson Ray (USA) 2466 – Rowley Robert (USA) 2234, Tulsa (USA) 2008.03.30})

9.Qxd3 {Vazquez recaptures while developing rather than attempting to restablish a pawn on “d4” by playing cxd3.}

e6 {Sam Shankland creates a standard Caro-Kann pawn structure in route to playing Be7.}

10.Nbd2 {The knight is better placed here rather than on “c3” because white will want to have the ability to move his c-pawn soon.}

Be7 {Shankland is a solid pawn up but will have to defend accurately in order to achieve victory against Vazquez’s dynamic style.}

11.c4 {Guillermo Vazquez is a very bold chess player.}

The position after 11. c4

The position after 11. c4

 

11… Bxg5

12.Nxg5 Ne7

13.Qb3 {The real reason behind “11. c4.”}

b6 {Shankland is playing very accurately when it counts the most.}

The position after 13... b6

The position after 13… b6

 

14.cxd5 cxd5

15.Rac1 Nbc6 {Sam’s defensive skills are exceptional.}

16.f4 {Vazquez is striking furiously on all sides of the board.}

The position after 16. f4

The position after 16. f4

 

Rc8 {Shankland is performing perfectly under heavy fire.}

17.Qd3 Nf5

18.Ndf3 O-O {Sam Shankland has survived unscathed! Unfortunately for Guillermo Vazquez, his brute-force attacking style has left plenty of holes in his position.}

The position after 18... 0-0

The position after 18… 0-0

 

19.Nh2 Qg3 {At this point, trading queens is no longer an option for white.}

20.Qd1

 

The position after 20. Qd1

The position after 20. Qd1

 

20… Nxe5 {!} {Now it is Shankland’s turn to attack.}

21.Rxc8 {if} ( 21.fxe5 {then} Qe3+ 22.Rf2 Rxc1 {!} )

Rxc8 22.fxe5 {There are alternatives for white but they would just elongate the misery.}

Qe3+ {!} {Now Vazquez can either drop a queen, get checkmated or resign. He chooses the latter.}

0-1

0-1

 

 

 

 

 

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World Chess Championship 2013: Preview 3 of the Anand-Carlsen Match

November 4, 2013

In our third preview game of the 2013 World Chess Championship Match between Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen, we are going to examine a stunning defeat of Anand at the hands of the cunning Russian chess player, Alexander Morozevich. In my humble opinion, this game clearly illustrates what is perhaps the best strategy for Magnus Carlsen in his upcoming match with Anand. Put simply, Magnus Carlsen needs to control his nerves and play dynamic attacking chess as much as possible. Below, Alexander Morozevich shows us how this is done:

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand's king safety.

Move 24: How did Morozevich(white) destroy Anand’s king safety?

 

[Event “It ‘Kremlin Stars'”]

[Site “Moscow (Russia)”]

[Date “1995”]

[Round “2”]

[White “Morozevich, Alexander (RUS)”]

[Black “Anand, Viswanathan (IND)”]

[Result “1-0”]

[Eco “C33”]

[Annotator “Chris Torres”]

 

1.e4 e5

2.f4 exf4

3.Bc4 Nf6 ( 3…Qh4+ 4.Kf1 d6 5.Nf3 Qh5 6.d4

g5 7.h4 Bg4 8.Nc3 Nc6 {Is how a more aggressive player might handle the black pieces.}

)

4.Nc3 c6 {This move takes a lot of the key squares away from white’s developed pieces and prepares a pawn thrust to “d5.”}

5.Bb3 d5

6.exd5 cxd5

7.d4 Bb4 {

At this point, objectively, black looks a little better. Both sides have one

center pawn and two developed pieces. Black does have an extra pawn and is

ready to castle. However, things can change very quickly in the King’s Gambit.}

8.Nf3 O-O

9.O-O Bxc3 {

A smart maneuver for Anand. His bishop was pinning white’s knight to just “air”

while exchanging creates a pawn weakness which can easily be attacked.}

10.bxc3 Qc7 {

Anand is still a little better than Morozevich. Both sides have two pieces

developed and a pawn in the center. Black momentarily has an extra pawn.}

11.Qe1 {I believe this is game represents the first time this idea has been tried.}

( 11.Qd3 b6 12.Ne5 Ba6 13.c4 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Bxc4 15.Nxc4 Nd5 16.Ne5

Nc6 17.Nxc6 Qxc6 18.Bxf4 Rac8 19.Qa3 Rfe8 20.Qf3 Nb4 21.Qxc6

Rxc6 22.Rae1 Rxe1 23.Rxe1 f6 24.Re8+ Kf7 25.Ra8 a5 26.Ra7+ Kg6

27.Rc7 Rxc2 28.Rxc2 Nxc2 29.Bc7 b5 30.d5 Kf7 {…0-1, Eberth Zoltan (HUN) 2198  – Vujosevic Vladimir (MNE) 2430 , Gyor 1997 It (open) “Nyar”}

) Nc6

12.Qh4 {Morozevich just wants to get Anand’s king. But isn’t that the real objective in chess?}

( 12.Ne5 Nxe5 13.Bxf4 Qc6 14.Bxe5 Ne4 15.Rf4 Be6 16.c4 dxc4 17.Qxe4

Qxe4 18.Rxe4 cxb3 19.axb3 Bf5 20.Re2 Rfe8 21.Rf2 Bg6 22.c4 a6

23.Bc7 Re3 24.d5 Rae8 25.Raf1 f6 26.Rf3 Kf7 27.Bb6 Rxf3 28.Rxf3

Ke7 29.Kf2 Kd7 30.Rg3 Rg8 31.Ke3 Re8+ {…1-0, Charbonneau Pascal (CAN) 2490  – Roussel-Roozmon Thomas (CAN) 2425 , Montreal  8/??/2004 It (cat.12)}

) Ne7

13.Bxf4 {Morozevich takes “f4” but will give Anand “c3.” Now who do you think is better? I would rather play with the white pieces.}

Qxc3

14.Bd2 {!?} {

Is this move brilliant or a mistake? Morozevich could have also played the more

natural looking “Bg5” or the “Qe1” retreat. However, Morozevich is not in the

mood to retreat and has a reputation for playing slightly outlandish moves.}

Qc7 {Anand retreats his queen to the most useful square he can find.}

15.Ne5 {Morozevich’s knight wastes no time finding its outpost.}

Nf5

16.Qf4 {The best choice for Morozevich but now his knight is pinned to an unattractive exchange of the queens.}

Be6 {Anand places his bishop on a bad square in order to unify his rooks.}

17.Bb4 {Forcing the rook from “f8” becomes important much later in the game.}

Rfc8

18.g4 {!} {It is now or never for Morozevich.}

Nd6

19.Rae1

{Morozevich has, more or less, all his pieces involved in the attack.}

Nfe4

20.c4 {!} {This move will eliminate the outpost for the black knight on “e4” as well as create more action for Morozevich’s light bishop.}

dxc4

21.Bc2 Nf6

22.g5 {!} {

When all your pieces are involved in the attack, sometimes it is up to the

pawns to create the final weaknesses in your enemy’s camp.}

Nh5{?} {Morozevich again proves that the best way to deal with Anand is to attack.

Viswanathan Anand should have played something like this:}

( 22…Nd5 23.Bxh7+ Kxh7 24.Qh4+ Kg8 25.Bxd6 Qxd6 26.g6 fxg6

27.Nxg6 Bf5 28.Qh8+ Kf7 29.Rxf5+ Nf6 30.Qh5 Qxd4+ )

23.Qf3 {!}

{Severe punishment is in store for Anand’s crime.}

g6

24.Nxg6{!} hxg6

25.Bxg6 {!} fxg6

26.Rxe6 Qf7

27.Qd5 {!} Nf5

28.Rxf5{!} {There is no defense for Anand now and he appropriately resigns.} 1-0

World Chess Championship 2013: Why I think Anand will win.

October 26, 2013

The majority of chess commentators seem to be figuring that Magnus Carlsen will defeat Viswanathan Anand and win the World Championship in his first attempt. This is likely do to the fact that, lately, Carlsen has been playing better chess than the current World Champion.  Certainly, the challenger has proven that he is capable of playing chess at the level of a world chess champion and Magnus is the current “number one.” However, the smart money will be placed on Viswanathan Anand to retain his title. Here’s why:

Viswanathan Anand will likely celebrate another World Championship with his beautiful wife Aruna.

Viswanathan Anand will likely celebrate another World Championship with his beautiful wife Aruna.

Home Field Advantage

The match will take place in Chennai, India. When FIDE announced that the match would be in Anand’s home country, I felt this gave the current World Champion a decisive advantage. In fact, FIDE could not have selected a more advantageous location for Anand than his home town.  The young Norwegian will be more distracted in India and his team will need to work hard to keep him comfortable in such an exotic location. Magnus Carlsen is used to performing under pressure but being completely surrounded by Anand’s fans will certainly make even the toughest competitor feel uneasy.

Ratings

Too much is being made of Magnus Carlsen being rated number one in the world. Magnus’ rating proves that he is the future of chess but he has acquired his number one ranking through tournament play. Anand has played very poorly in tounaments since becoming World Champion for reasons that are easy to explain. Tournaments to Anand are a necessary distraction from competing in world championship matches. Anand’s priority number one is retaining his world title.  Viswanathan rarely plays any of his critical innovations when it does not help him win a World Championship. Because he employs a weaker version of himself during the vast majority of his rated games, Anand’s rating does not accurately reflect his true strength

Youthfulness

Many see this match as the chance for chess to move completely into the twenty-first century. Indeed, if the “Mozart of Chess” manages to dethrone the old champion he will be the king of chess.  While no one will dispute that being young is incredibly advantageous in chess, it is also common knowledge that young chess players also perform more inconsistently. If Magnus plays his best chess, he has a reasonable chance of winning the match. However, we can be sure that Viswanathan Anand will be in top form and will bring the consistency of a seasoned pro to every game. I believe Anand’s experience and wisdom will more than make up for Magnus Carlsen’s youthful energy.

Match Play

As stated above, Anand is unbelievably good at match play. Magnus Carlsen has limited experience in matches and has never felt the pressure of playing for a world championship. Coupled with the aforementioned home field advantage, this should be enough for Anand to take an early lead in the match and then close it out before Magnus ever gets comfortable.

Anand’s Legacy

This represents the first time that Anand has had a chance to play a World Championship for “his people.” Anand is a national hero in India and I believe nothing is more important to the future of Indian chess than Anand retaining the World Championship title in Chennai.  A failure on his part will be a seen as a failure for Indian chess. FIDE’s gift to India is the chance for their greatest player to establish his name as one of the greatest chess champions ever while playing in his hometown. I believe Anand is acutely aware of what is at stake and will rise to the occasion.

As for Magnus, perhaps failing in his first attempt at winning the World Championship will be the best thing for his chess future. A defeat on chess highest stage will make the “Mozart of Chess” work even harder to ensure it doesn’t happen the second time around. The next time Magnus plays for the World Championship, one can only hope that FIDE chooses a site that is fair for both competitors.

Magnus Carlsen will likely benefit from defeat in his first attempt at the world chess championship.

Magnus Carlsen will likely benefit from defeat in his first attempt at the world chess championship.

The official site for the 2013 FIDE World Chess Championship.

World Youth Chess Championship 2011

November 17, 2011

This November the world’s most talented players who are eighteen years and younger will converge upon Caldas Novas, Brazil in order to compete in the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship. These extraordinary chess talents will do battle for nine rounds in hopes of placing in the top three for their age group. Those fortunate enough to accomplish this task will be rewarded with bronze, silver and gold medals in an olympic style ceremony. Round one of the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship will begin on Friday the eighteenth of November. The official website for this event is http://www.wycc2011.com/. Those interested in the 2011 World Youth Chess Championship should also keep visiting this blog for regular updates on California’s participants as well as the insider details from my student Ben Rood.

FIDE Top 100

November 9, 2009

Below is the FIDE top 100 list for November(source http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/).  Vugar Gashimov broke into the top 10 for the first time in his career. Born in 1986,  Mr. Gashimov  hails from Azerbaijan and is known for his extreme skill in one minute chess. Below is a recent example of his Brilliant play against American grandmaster Gata Kamsky:

[Event "Baku Grand Prix"]
[Site "Baku AZE"]
[Date "2008.04.28"]
[EventDate "2008.04.21"]
[Round "7"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Vugar Gashimov"]
[Black "Gata Kamsky"]
[ECO "C84"]
[WhiteElo "2679"]
[BlackElo "2726"]
[PlyCount "103"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5
7. Bb3 O-O 8. h3 Bb7 9. d3 d6 10. a3 Qd7 11. Nbd2 Rfe8 12. Nf1
Nd8 13. Ng3 Ne6 14. Ba2 c5 15. Bd2 Bf8 16. b4 h6 17. c4 Nf4
18. Re3 bxc4 19. dxc4 Ne6 20. Bb1 g6 21. Re1 Qc7 22. Bd3 Bg7
23. Rb1 Nd7 24. Ne2 Nd4 25. Nc3 Rec8 26. Rc1 Qd8 27. Nd5 Bc6
28. Bf1 Nf8 29. Nxd4 exd4 30. f4 Nd7 31. Qf3 Rcb8 32. Qg3 cxb4
33. axb4 a5 34. b5 Bxd5 35. cxd5 Nc5 36. e5 a4 37. Bb4 a3
38. Bxa3 d3 39. Bxc5 d2 40. Bxd6 Rb7 41. Red1 dxc1=Q 42. Rxc1
Rba7 43. Qb3 Ra1 44. Bc7 Qh4 45. Rxa1 Rxa1 46. Qf3 Qe1 47. b6
Qb4 48. d6 Qd4+ 49. Kh2 Rb1 50. b7 Rxb7 51. Qxb7 Qxf4+ 52. g3
1-0
FIDE Rating List November 2009 Top 100
Rk Se09 Name Title NAT YroB ap08 ju08 oc08 ja09 ap09 ju09 se09 Rating Gms
1 1 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 1975 2767 2777 2791 2796 2812 2813 2813 2810 10
2 4 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 1990 2765 2775 2786 2776 2770 2772 2772 2801 10
3 2 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 1969 2803 2798 2783 2791 2783 2788 2788 2788 0
4 3 Aronian, Levon g ARM 1982 2763 2737 2757 2750 2754 2768 2773 2786 13
5 5 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 1975 2788 2788 2772 2759 2759 2759 2772 2772 0
6 14 Gashimov, Vugar g AZE 1986 2679 2717 2703 2723 2730 2740 2740 2758 11
7 9 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 1968 2723 2720 2719 2733 2733 2755 2756 2758 11
8 12 Svidler, Peter g RUS 1976 2746 2738 2727 2723 2726 2739 2741 2754 17
9 6 Leko, Peter g HUN 1979 2741 2741 2747 2751 2751 2756 2762 2752 10
10 10 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 1977 2774 2788 2787 2771 2751 2751 2750 2750 0
11 7 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 1987 2751 2744 2751 2761 2756 2756 2757 2748 10
12 8 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 1969 2740 2781 2786 2779 2746 2703 2756 2739 13
13 13 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 1983 2719 2718 2719 2726 2726 2727 2741 2739 5
14 17 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 1983 2716 2728 2719 2733 2748 2733 2733 2736 13
15 11 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 1983 2711 2709 2737 2760 2753 2760 2742 2736 10
16 15 Wang, Yue g CHN 1987 2689 2704 2736 2739 2738 2736 2736 2734 27
17 24 Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 1983 2687 2716 2720 2693 2693 2716 2717 2729 15
18 20 Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 1990 2732 2727 2730 2706 2721 2717 2722 2723 12
19 21 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 1985 2752 2742 2731 2724 2725 2717 2721 2719 25
20 18 Shirov, Alexei g ESP 1972 2740 2741 2726 2745 2745 2732 2730 2719 18
21 22 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 1983 2695 2708 2719 2717 2721 2716 2719 2719 0
22 26 Movsesian, Sergei g SVK 1978 2695 2723 2732 2751 2747 2716 2711 2718 16
23 23 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 1990 2632 2681 2716 2696 2684 2703 2718 2718 0
24 16 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 1987 2686 2697 2704 2699 2701 2710 2735 2715 17
25 19 Alekseev, Evgeny g RUS 1985 2711 2708 2715 2718 2716 2714 2725 2715 7
26 36 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 1982 2684 2650 2664 2702 2688 2693 2696 2711 20
27 44 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 1987 2658 2646 2646 2664 2684 2689 2688 2708 21
28 42 Wang, Hao g CHN 1989 2689 2704 2736 2739 2696 2690 2690 2708 13
29 29 Short, Nigel D g ENG 1965 2660 2655 2642 2663 2674 2684 2706 2707 16
30 39 Navara, David g CZE 1985 2672 2646 2633 2638 2654 2687 2692 2707 9
31 25 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 1980 2689 2689 2675 2692 2709 2707 2715 2706 26
32 31 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam g UZB 1979 2681 2679 2672 2687 2695 2672 2702 2705 5
33 48 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 1976 2674 2668 2663 2680 2685 2684 2685 2704 15
34 28 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 1983 2705 2691 2705 2722 2728 2721 2709 2700 27
35 34 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 1971 2673 2673 2679 2700 2696 2712 2698 2700 7
36 50 Adams, Michael g ENG 1971 2729 2735 2734 2712 2703 2699 2682 2698 12
37 30 Rublevsky, Sergei g RUS 1974 2695 2699 2702 2702 2702 2703 2703 2697 17
38 45 Nielsen, Peter Heine g DEN 1973 2629 2652 2662 2660 2668 2680 2687 2697 10
39 35 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 1983 2658 2665 2664 2669 2687 2684 2696 2696 0
40 27 Motylev, Alexander g RUS 1979 2666 2674 2672 2676 2677 2710 2710 2695 23
41 38 Kamsky, Gata g USA 1974 2726 2723 2729 2725 2720 2717 2692 2695 16
42 53 Vitiugov, Nikita g RUS 1987 2617 2616 2638 2687 2688 2681 2681 2694 24
43 43 Bologan, Viktor g MDA 1971 2665 2686 2682 2687 2690 2689 2688 2692 24
44 52 Volokitin, Andrei g UKR 1986 2684 2672 2659 2671 2671 2678 2681 2691 16
45 47 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 1985 2623 2665 2678 2693 2700 2697 2685 2689 26
46 41 Miroshnichenko, Evgenij g UKR 1978 2642 2593 2632 2667 2680 2696 2690 2686 26
47 32 Bu, Xiangzhi g CHN 1985 2708 2710 2714 2702 2704 2702 2702 2682 22
48 46 Polgar, Judit g HUN 1976 2709 2711 2711 2693 2693 2687 2687 2680 6
49 37 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 1980 2650 2632 2678 2676 2690 2682 2694 2677 17
50 67 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 1976 2684 2692 2684 2675 2675 2675 2664 2677 14
51 54 Sargissian, Gabriel g ARM 1983 2643 2660 2642 2678 2660 2667 2678 2676 16
52 33 Onischuk, Alexander g USA 1975 2664 2670 2644 2659 2684 2699 2699 2672 18
53 56 Harikrishna, P. g IND 1986 2679 2668 2659 2673 2686 2679 2673 2672 16
54 68 Georgiev, Kiril g BUL 1965 2665 2671 2645 2634 2637 2645 2663 2672 13
55 62 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 1986 2695 2687 2696 2679 2678 2678 2667 2671 5
56 83 Efimenko, Zahar g UKR 1985 2660 2670 2680 2688 2682 2654 2654 2668 24
57 55 Sutovsky, Emil g ISR 1977 2630 2654 2651 2660 2660 2675 2676 2666 26
58 59 Kurnosov, Igor g RUS 1985 2593 2617 2606 2602 2658 2669 2669 2666 20
59 51 Najer, Evgeniy g RUS 1977 2627 2670 2682 2669 2669 2663 2681 2666 17
60 40 Ni, Hua g CHN 1983 2703 2705 2710 2709 2724 2701 2692 2665 35
61 57 Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 1973 2634 2645 2686 2684 2697 2674 2670 2664 34
62 63 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 1986 2650 2664 2664 2673 2657 2651 2667 2664 16
63 81 Landa, Konstantin g RUS 1972 2633 2615 2613 2626 2627 2655 2655 2664 16
64 74 Sasikiran, Krishnan g IND 1981 2679 2684 2694 2711 2682 2669 2661 2664 9
65 88 Smirin, Ilia g ISR 1968 2630 2637 2649 2647 2641 2650 2648 2662 16
66 69 Berkes, Ferenc g HUN 1985 2618 2645 2645 2651 2638 2647 2663 2661 21
67 93 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 1985 2638 2617 2656 2634 2635 2647 2646 2661 16
68 78 Roiz, Michael g ISR 1983 2659 2680 2677 2647 2635 2658 2658 2659 3
69 85 Krasenkow, Michal g POL 1963 2624 2639 2624 2620 2622 2631 2651 2656 19
70 90 Lastin, Alexander g RUS 1976 2622 2639 2651 2643 2650 2648 2648 2656 11
71 70 Pashikian, Arman g ARM 1987 2537 2564 2611 2621 2655 2650 2663 2656 11
72 71 Dreev, Alexey g RUS 1969 2657 2657 2670 2688 2668 2660 2662 2655 44
73 92 Baklan, Vladimir g UKR 1978 2647 2631 2625 2627 2618 2639 2646 2655 32
74 60 Avrukh, Boris g ISR 1978 2632 2656 2657 2645 2647 2641 2668 2655 7
75 Ganguly, Surya Shekhar g IND 1983 2614 2631 2603 2614 2625 2637 2634 2654 25
76 95 Fier, Alexandr g BRA 1988 2527 2558 2581 2590 2595 2604 2644 2653 28
77 100 Kazhgaleyev, Murtas g KAZ 1973 2617 2641 2640 2630 2626 2639 2643 2653 15
78 77 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 1981 2656 2673 2676 2666 2664 2667 2658 2653 14
79 65 Meier, Georg g GER 1987 2560 2556 2558 2608 2641 2658 2664 2653 10
80 49 Grachev, Boris g RUS 1986 2610 2640 2653 2655 2652 2669 2684 2652 23
81 72 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 1992 2620 2630 2640 2646 2649 2670 2662 2652 21
82 82 Predojevic, Borki g BIH 1987 2651 2634 2615 2650 2652 2644 2654 2652 17
83 86 Van Wely, Loek g NED 1972 2676 2644 2618 2625 2622 2655 2650 2652 15
84 79 Sokolov, Ivan g BIH 1968 2690 2658 2650 2657 2669 2655 2657 2652 11
85 76 Milov, Vadim g SUI 1972 2690 2705 2681 2669 2659 2659 2659 2652 5
86 61 Timofeev, Artyom g RUS 1985 2664 2650 2670 2671 2677 2681 2668 2651 22
87 84 Postny, Evgeny g ISR 1981 2649 2661 2674 2652 2648 2647 2651 2650 26
88 Smeets, Jan g NED 1985 2578 2593 2604 2601 2626 2632 2642 2650 17
89 73 Fridman, Daniel g GER 1976 2640 2637 2630 2650 2646 2665 2661 2649 15
90 94 Seirawan, Yasser g USA 1960 2630 2634 2634 2634 2634 2646 2646 2649 1
91 Vescovi, Giovanni g BRA 1978 2617 2631 2635 2635 2631 2631 2636 2648 19
92 80 Beliavsky, Alexander G g SLO 1953 2641 2606 2619 2646 2640 2662 2656 2648 17
93 91 Zhigalko, Sergei g BLR 1989 2568 2583 2592 2587 2622 2621 2646 2646 0
94 66 Inarkiev, Ernesto g RUS 1985 2684 2675 2669 2656 2676 2675 2664 2645 21
95 Savchenko, Boris g RUS 1986 2569 2578 2648 2654 2655 2650 2638 2644 29
96 Khismatullin, Denis g RUS 1984 2584 2613 2606 2601 2601 2604 2614 2643 16
97 Socko, Bartosz g POL 1978 2644 2627 2631 2631 2637 2656 2637 2643 15
98 89 Kobalia, Mikhail g RUS 1978 2627 2618 2630 2634 2645 2645 2648 2643 9
99 Korobov, Anton g UKR 1985 2590 2590 2605 2613 2616 2623 2633 2642 14
100 58 Tkachiev, Vladislav g FRA 1973 2657 2664 2664 2657 2657 2650 2669 2642 14

Kramnik vs. Anand

October 4, 2008

Just ten days until the Anand vs. Kramnik World Chess Championship match of 2008!

Tonight I present another preview game for the upcoming World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik. The game I chose is a recent example of the two contenders going head to head in a major event.  My analysis is above the game that was played at the Corus tournament in 2007.  Enjoy!

chessbase.com)

Kramnik vs. Anand (source:chessbase.com)

10…Ra7 Anand starts to mix it up early. 10… Be4 is a lot more natural and common in the Catalan.

16. a3 Kramnik’s invention. This move serves to limit Anand’s bishop on the queen-side.

22…Nc4 Perhaps Anand should have tried 22… Bc4 23. Nxc4 Nxc4 and Anand has a knight to harass Kramnik with.

25…c6 Anand’s pawn had been under attack at c7. However, moving forward allows Kramnik to control the d8 square with his Bishop.

26. Rd1 is real trouble for Anand due to the fact that Kramnik’s Bishop forces Anand to place a rook on d7 rather than d8.

28. Rd1 Now Kramnik controls the d file.

30. f4 Is a very interesting move by Kramnik. 30. Qd4 forms a nice battery on the d file and is what most strong players would play. However, Kramnik must feel he wants his queen leading the charge on the d file.

30… Re6 Anand attempts to punish Kramnik’s last move by forcing his rook to retreat. Even with the retreat, Kramnik will still control the open file.  

32. Qd4 Kramnik reveals his intentions of having the queen lead down the d file.

36. e5 Kramnik unleashes his bishop on g2. Another way of activating the bishop would have been moving it to h3.

43. a4 Kramnik delivers a knock-out blow to Anand with his a pawn.  

 

[Event “Corus A”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
[Date “2007.??.??”]
[White “Kramnik,V”]
[Black “Anand,V”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2766”]
[BlackElo “2779”]
[ECO “E06”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3
O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. Qxc4 b5 9. Qc2
Bb7 10. Bd2 Ra7 11. Rc1 Be4 12. Qb3 Nc6 13. e3
Qa8 14. Qd1 Nb8 15. Ba5 Rc8 16. a3 Bd6 17. Nbd2
Bd5 18. Qf1 Nbd7 19. b4 e5 20. dxe5 Bxe5 21. Nxe5
Nxe5 22. f3 Nc4 23. Nxc4 Bxc4 24. Qf2 Re8 25. e4
c6 26. Rd1 Rd7 27. Rxd7 Nxd7 28. Rd1 Qb7 29. Rd6
f6 30. f4 Re6 31. Rd2 Re7 32. Qd4 Nf8 33. Qd8
Rd7 34. Rxd7 Qxd7 35. Qxd7 Nxd7 36. e5 fxe5 37. Bxc6
Nf6 38. Bb7 exf4 39. gxf4 Nd5 40. Kf2 Nxf4 41. Ke3
g5 42. Bxa6 Kf7 43. a4 Ke7 44. Bxb5 Bxb5 45. axb5
Kd7 46. Ke4 Ne2 47. Bb6 g4 48. Bf2 Nc3+ 49. Kf5
Nxb5 50. Kxg4 Ke6 51. Kg5 Kf7 52. Kf5 Ke7 53. Bc5+
 1-0


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